viaLibri Requires Cookies CLICK HERE TO HIDE THIS NOTICE

Recently found by viaLibri....

Collection of fourteen autograph letters, signed, and manuscript letters or circulars in a secretarial hand, from Commodore Edward Preble to Tobias Lear, the American consul to the Barbary States, discussing all the most important issues and actions of the Barbary wars]
1804 - [25]pp. of manuscript, written on folded folio sheets. Several pages have tears from wax seals or otherwise, with some paper loss, affecting a few words of text on two letters, but generally with no loss of text or readability. Overall very good. In a half morocco clamshell case. An outstanding archive relating to the United States' first major overseas conflict A truly outstanding group of letters from Commodore Edward Preble to Tobias Lear, addressing all the most important issues in the era of the Barbary Wars. Preble, commander of the United States Mediterranean Squadron, and Lear, the consul in Algiers, were the two most important Americans in the most sensitive region for the United States. Theirs is a correspondence of the highest level, and offers unparalleled insights into the diplomatic and military policies of the United States during the Barbary Wars. Edward Preble and Tobias Lear likely knew each other since the 1770s, as both were students at Dummer Academy in Massachusetts in the early years of the American Revolution. In 1803 Preble was made commander of the Mediterranean Squadron and Tobias Lear was the newly-appointed American consul general to the Barbary States. The Mediterranean was an important trading region for the United States, but the region was a mine field as well, as pirates sponsored by the leaders of the Barbary states routinely harassed and attacked American shipping in the area. Preble and Lear sailed to the Mediterranean together in the summer of 1803, aboard the USS Constitution; Lear charged with improving American relations with Algiers, Tripoli, Tunis, and Morocco, and Preble with projecting American military might into the region, to protect American trading interests. The letters in this collection address the capture of the USS Philadelphia and the subsequent destruction of that ship by American forces in the bay of Tripoli; Preble's capture of the ship that was used in the American attack on the Philadelphia; strategies for ransoming the crew of the Philadelphia; Preble's blockade of the port of Tripoli and his attacks on Morocco and Tripoli; and much more. The letters in this collection are dated September, 1803 to December, 1804. Four of the letters appear to be completely in Preble's hand, while the other ten are in secretarial hands. Commodore Edward Preble (1761-1807) was born at Falmouth (now Portland, Maine). He joined the Massachusetts state navy in 1780, and participated in battles against the Royal Navy and Loyalist privateers. For a brief time he was held prisoner by the British aboard the prison ship, Jersey. After the war he engaged as a master and supercargo of merchants vessels sailing to Europe, Africa, and the West Indies. By the time of the "Quasi War" in the 1790s he was eager to join the American navy, and was commissioned a lieutenant in 1798, and was promoted to captain the following year. In 1803-1804 Preble was commander of the U.S. Mediterranean Squadron, arguably the most important command in the navy at the time. The United States was at war with the Barbary states and Preble's activities in this period - the period covered by the present group of letters - are what made his reputation. He fought successfully against Morocco and Tripoli and engineered, with Stephen Decatur, the destruction of the captured American frigate, Philadelphia. After his return to the United States he supervised the construction of gunboats and served as an adviser to the Navy. Tobias Lear (1762-1816) is best known for his service as George Washington's personal secretary, and for his diplomatic work. He served as Washington's aid from 1786 to 1793, and again from 1798 until Washington's death the next year. He was very close to the Washington family - he married two of Washington's nieces, was at George Washington's bedside when he died, and was executor of his estate. Lear's activities in that capacity were clouded by controversy, as he was suspected of destroying several of Washi [Attributes: Signed Copy]
      [Bookseller: Donald A. Heald Rare Books (ABAA)]
Last Found On: 2015-09-27           Check availability:      AbeBooks    

LINK TO THIS PAGE: www.vialibri.net/years/items/980021/1804-preble-commodore-edward-collection-of-fourteen-autograph-letters-signed

Browse more rare books from the year 1804


      Home     Wants Manager     Library Search     561 Years   Links     Contact      Search Help      Terms of Service     


Copyright © 2017 viaLibri™ Limited. All rights reserved.