viaLibri Requires Cookies CLICK HERE TO HIDE THIS NOTICE

Recently found by viaLibri....

One of Benjamin Franklin's Best Letters: On American Independence, his View that Freedom of Commerce is More Crucial than Civil Liberty, and his Comforts on Returning Home
Philadelphia, PA 1787 - Autograph Letter Signed, to the abb Andr Morellet. Philadelphia, Pa., April 22, 1787. 4 pp., 8 1/4 x 13 1/4 in. "People are almost unanimous in being satisfied with the Revolution. the enthusiastic Joy with which the Day of the Declaration of Independence is everywhere annually celebrated, are indisputable Proofs of this Truth."Franklin responds to the abb Andr Morellet with a delightful and intimate letter that shares his thoughts on a wide range of subjects, from the comfort of being home (after 9 years as America's minister to France), to the best methods of collecting taxes in sparsely populated but growing nation, to the primacy of economic over political liberty, to pockets of unrest in America, and the sustained interest in the Revolution and Declaration of Independence. "I am of the same Opinion with you respecting the Freedom of Commerce, in Countries especially where direct Taxes are practicable. This will be our Case in time when our wide-extended Country fills up with Inhabitants. Nothing can be better express'd than your Sentiments are on this Point, where you prefer Liberty of Trading, Cultivating, Manufacturing, &c. even to political civil Liberty, this being affected but rarely, the others every Hour." These issues were certainly on Franklin's mind. A few weeks after he wrote this letter, delegates started to gather for the Constitutional Convention. Franklin joined the convention on May 28, right after a quorum was achieved, and brokered compromises at several crucial moments.An amazing Founders letter. Leonard W. Labaree, the inaugural editor of The Papers of Benjamin Franklin, considered this "one of Franklin's best, written in his most delightful vein of intimate conversation with a dear friend." Transcript Philada. April 22-87.My very dear Friend, I received, tho' long after they were written, your very agreable Favours of Oct. 30-85, and February 9.-86, with the Pieces enclos'd, Productions of the Auteuil Academy of Belles Lettres. Your kind and friendly Wishes and Congratulations are extremely obliging. It gives me infinite Pleasure to find that I still retain a favourable Place in the Remembrance of the worthy and the Good, whose delightful & instructive Society I had the Happiness of enjoying while I resided in France. But tho' I could not leave that dear Nation without Regret, I certainly did right in coming home. I am here in my Niche, in my own House, in the Bosom of my Family, my Daughter and Grandchildren, all about me, among my old Friends or the Sons of my Friends who equally respect me; and who all speak and understand the same Language with me; and you know that if a Man desires to be useful by the Exercise of his mental Faculties, he loses half their Force when in a foreign Country, where he can only express himself in a Language with which he is not well acquainted. In short I enjoy here Every Opportunity of doing Good, and every thing else I could wish for, except Repose; and that I may soon expect, either by the Cessation of my Office, which cannot last more than 3 Years, or by ceasing to live. I am of the same Opinion with you respecting the Freedom of Commerce, in Countries especially where direct Taxes are practicable. This will be our Case in time when our wide-extended Country fills up with Inhabitants. But at present they are so sparsely settled, often 5 or 6 Miles distant from one another in the back Counties, that the Collection of a direct Tax is almost impossible the Trouble of the Collector's going from House to House, amounting to more than the Value of the Tax.- Nothing can be better express'd than your Sentiments are on this Point, where you prefer Liberty of Trading, Cultivating, Manufacturing, &c. even to political civil Liberty, this being affected but rarely, the others every Hour. Our Debt occasion'd by the War, being heavy, we are under the Necessity of using Imposts, and every Method we can think of to assist in raising . (See website for full description)
      [Bookseller: Seth Kaller Inc.]
Last Found On: 2015-08-10           Check availability:      IberLibro    

LINK TO THIS PAGE: www.vialibri.net/years/items/956789/1787-benjamin-franklin-one-of-benjamin-franklins-best-letters

Browse more rare books from the year 1787


      Home     Wants Manager     Library Search     561 Years   Links     Contact      Search Help      Terms of Service     


Copyright © 2017 viaLibri™ Limited. All rights reserved.