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Topographical Map of the Road from Missouri to Oregon, Commencing at the Mouth of the Kansas in the Missouri River and Ending at the Mouth of the Wallah Wallah in the Columbia, In VII Sections.... From the field notes and journal of Capt. J.C. Frémont, an
Charles Preuss (1804-1854)Topographical Map of the Road from Missouri to Oregon, Commencing at the Mouth of the Kansas in the Missouri River and Ending at the Mouth of the Wallah Wallah in the Columbia, In VII Sections.... From the field notes and journal of Capt. J.C. Frémont, and from sketches and notes made on the ground by his assistant Charles Preuss E. Weber, Baltimore,1846Lithographed map on 7 sheets20 1/2? x 30 1/2? framed (each)The U.S. Senate ordered ten thousand copies of this topographical road map of the Oregon Trail, which followed the Kansas and Platte rivers across the Great Plains. A German cartographer, Preuss had compiled John C. Fremont?s earlier maps based on his surveys and the explorer?s journal and field notes. The map was lithographed by E. Weber and Company, a Baltimore firm that later, under the name of August Hoen and Company, became one of the principal publishers of government reports and maps. Weber had studied lithography in Munich under the watchful eye of Aloys Senefelder, who had developed the process.Preuss?s map was issued in seven sections so that it could easily be read by wagonmasters under the most adverse conditions. Each section was drawn at a scale of one inch to 10 miles and covered approximately 250 miles. A table of meteorologic observations and notes extracted from Fremont?s report provided information about the region. The section on display shows that portion of the Oregon Trail from its junction with the Platte River at Grand Island to beyond the confluence of the north and south forks. A note, marking the point of Fremont?s ?First view of Buffalo,? captures the nineteenth-century romanticism of the plains: ?We had heard from a distance a dull and confused murmuring and when we came in view of their dark masses, there was not one among us who did not feel his heart beat quicker.... Indians and buffalo make the poetry and life of the prairie and our camp was full of their exhiliration.?Like later road maps, Preuss?s map contains helpful travelers? aids. Distances in miles from Westport Landing (Kansas City are marked along the trail. The map also provides comments on the availability of wild game for food, fuel, ?Some drift wood and buffalo excrements makes the fuel, as that of the camels does in the deserts of Arabia?, and safety, ?Good guard ought to be kept. Pawnees, if they do not kill, will at least take what they can from the travellers by force if they are strong, and by stealth if too weak to act openly.??This map was a road guide for Oregon emigrants such as had never previously existed. Owing to its rarity and to its having long stood in the shadow of the much more widely known and distributed Frémont map of 1845, Preuss?s sectional map of 1846 has been insufficiently appreciated by students of Western history. There were two issues of the map, the original 1846 issue, and that contained in the 1849 Rockwell report. This is the original 1846 separate issue, with the lithographer?s imprint.
      [Bookseller: Arader Galleries]
Last Found On: 2013-07-20           Check availability:      Biblio    

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