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THE ANTIQUITIES OF ENGLAND AND WALES. [bound uniformly with] THE ANTIQUITIES OF SCOTLAND. [and] THE ANTIQUITIES OF IRELAND. [and] MILITARY ANTIQUITIES RESPECTING A HISTORY OF THE ENGLISH ARMY. [and] A TREATISE ON ANCIENT ARMOUR AND WEAPONS. [and] SUPPLEMENT TO A TREATISE ON ANCIENT ARMOUR. [and] DARELL, W. THE HISTORY OF DOVER CASTLE
London: S. Hooper, 1786-95. FIRST EDITIONS of "Scotland," "Ireland," "Military Antiquities," "Supplement," and "Dover Castle.". This is a very attractively bound set of all of the major publications--in their fully expanded form--of English antiquary Francis Grose. First published in six volumes in 1772, "Antiquities of England and Wales" was Grose's breakthrough work, establishing his name and reputation. It was released in expanded new editions and supplemented over the next dozen years; our 1787 edition contains the most complete text, with all additions and supplements. Grose followed up on this success with his works on military antiquities and on armor. These well-illustrated and useful works combine a history of the English army with a treatise on weapons and armor, "illustrated by plates taken from the original armour in the Tower of London, and other arsenals, museums, and cabinets." "Military Antiquities" is not the history of battles, but the history of the development and organization of the army, examining such things as the requirements for military service, methods of mustering troops, rates of pay, and standard weapons and equipment for the various historical periods. "Ancient Armour" and its "Supplement" contain a discussion of English armor (with a small section on Asiatic armor) from the Norman conquest until it fell out of use after the general employment of gunpowder, along with a general history of the development of armor and weapons. Driven partly by insatiable curiosity and partly by the need for funds, Grose went on to publish surveys of the antiquities in Scotland and Ireland, and was working on the latter at the time of his death. Born and educated in England, Francis Grose (1731?-91) studied classics and art, then inherited a substantial fortune, which he squandered in short order. DNB describes Grose as Falstaffian, "immensely corpulent, full of humor and good nature." He died of apoplexy in Dublin, still hard at work ferreting out more fodder for his work. While his various "Antiquities" appear on the market with some regularity, it is uncommon to find such a complete set in such pleasant bindings. The final volume here is not by Grose, but fits in well with his antiquarian studies. Although author William Darell lived and wrote in the 16th century, producing a noted work on Kentish castles, the 1786 publication of the "Dover Castle" portion of that work was his first appearance in print. Darell was a prebendary at Canterbury Cathedral and announced the election of Matthew Parker as archbishop, but he had a sharp fall from grace in the late 1570s when he was caught smuggling a lady of dubious reputation into his quarters in a laundry basket.. 285 x 220 mm. (11 1/4 x 8 5/8"); ("Scotland" 10 mm. shorter). 16 volumes. FIRST EDITIONS of "Scotland," "Ireland," "Military Antiquities," "Supplement," and "Dover Castle." HANDSOME CONTEMPORARY RED STRAIGHT-GRAIN MOROCCO, GILT, covers with frame of plain and dotted rules and two decorative rolls, oblique fleuron cornerpieces, flat spines divided into compartments by decorative rolls, octagonal centerpiece containing a star tool, with lancets radiating toward corners, gilt titling, gilt-rolled turn-ins, marbled endapers, all edges gilt. With 56 vignette maps of the counties of England and Wales, hand-colored in outline, and 633 (of 635) plates, including a folding map; lacking the plates of Stanstead Place and Malmsbury Market Cross in "England." Front pastedowns with bookplates of Samuel Rodbard and Hugh and Frances Fattorini. A hint of darkening to some spines, extremities just slightly rubbed, a few minor spots or stains to boards, but the bindings entirely sound, with very little wear, and making an extremely pleasing appearance on the shelf. Occasional marginal smudges, mild offsetting or minor foxing from some of the plates (more pronounced in half a dozen instances), but A REALLY EXCELLENT SET, clean and fresh inside and out, and with few signs of use. This is a very attractively bound set of all of the major publications--in their fully expanded form--of English antiquary Francis Grose. First published in six volumes in 1772, "Antiquities of England and Wales" was Grose's breakthrough work, establishing his name and reputation. It was released in expanded new editions and supplemented over the next dozen years; our 1787 edition contains the most complete text, with all additions and supplements. Grose followed up on this success with his works on military antiquities and on armor. These well-illustrated and useful works combine a history of the English army with a treatise on weapons and armor, "illustrated by plates taken from the original armour in the Tower of London, and other arsenals, museums, and cabinets." "Military Antiquities" is not the history of battles, but the history of the development and organization of the army, examining such things as the requirements for military service, methods of mustering troops, rates of pay, and standard weapons and equipment for the various historical periods. "Ancient Armour" and its "Supplement" contain a discussion of English armor (with a small section on Asiatic armor) from the Norman conquest until it fell out of use after the general employment of gunpowder, along with a general history of the development of armor and weapons. Driven partly by insatiable curiosity and partly by the need for funds, Grose went on to publish surveys of the antiquities in Scotland and Ireland, and was working on the latter at the time of his death. Born and educated in England, Francis Grose (1731?-91) studied classics and art, then inherited a substantial fortune, which he squandered in short order. DNB describes Grose as Falstaffian, "immensely corpulent, full of humor and good nature." He died of apoplexy in Dublin, still hard at work ferreting out more fodder for his work. While his various "Antiquities" appear on the market with some regularity, it is uncommon to find such a complete set in such pleasant bindings. The final volume here is not by Grose, but fits in well with his antiquarian studies. Although author William Darell lived and wrote in the 16th century, producing a noted work on Kentish castles, the 1786 publication of the "Dover Castle" portion of that work was his first appearance in print. Darell was a prebendary at Canterbury Cathedral and announced the election of Matthew Parker as archbishop, but he had a sharp fall from grace in the late 1570s when he was caught smuggling a lady of dubious reputation into his quarters in a laundry basket.
      [Bookseller: Phillip J. Pirages Fine Books and Mediev]
Last Found On: 2017-06-22           Check availability:      IOBABooks    

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