viaLibri Requires Cookies CLICK HERE TO HIDE THIS NOTICE

Recently found by viaLibri....

WANTED, NOT UNTIL MARCH 4th, 1825, AN HONEST, INTELLIGENT AND FAITHFUL MAN SERVANT, TO SERVE THE PEOPLE OF THE UNITED STATES, AS THEIR PRESIDENT...[first line of text]
[N.p., 1824. Broadside, 11 x 9 inches. Old fold lines. A few small stains. Very good. A scarce and intriguing campaign broadside from the 1824 presidential election presented in the form of a "help wanted" ad, naming no specific candidate, but calling for an honest man to be a servant to the people, uncorrupted and incorruptible. The broadside repeatedly calls for representation of the common man over political cronies, support of American goods and interest over foreign concerns, and plain honest speech over flattery and rhetoric. In a cry that hearkens down through the years to the present day, it states: "Above all things he must be a Republican in deed and in truth: one who will acknowledge and found his practice upon the broad principles which are the foundation of the federal constitution, who will remember that Government was instituted for the common good, and not for the interest or agrandizement [sic] of a few at the expense of the many: who will keep an eye over the State Treasury and see that the expenses of the American family do not exceed their income; one, in short, who is not too proud to acknowledge that he is no more than the first servant of the people, and will neither be ashamed or afraid to do their will and attend to their interests in preference to those of all the Intriguers, Courtiers and Flatterers on earth." In the election of 1824, none of the four candidates running for office - Andrew Jackson, John Quincy Adams, William H. Crawford, and Henry Clay - secured a majority of electoral votes, and the decision was thrown into the House of Representatives. Henry Clay, who was one of the candidates, was compelled to cast the deciding ballot by virtue of being House Speaker. He chose John Quincy Adams over Andrew Jackson, and much controversy ensued over an alleged "corrupt bargain" between Clay and Adams, with Adams naming Clay as his Secretary of State. Jackson would win the 1828 election against the incumbent Adams, partially as a backlash from the election of 1824. Only three copies in OCLC, at Brown University, the Huntington, and the New-York Historical Society. OCLC 54042567, 58786287, 228709189.
      [Bookseller: William Reese Company - Americana]
Last Found On: 2017-06-22           Check availability:      Biblio    

LINK TO THIS PAGE: www.vialibri.net/years/items/10421030/1824-election-of-1824-wanted-not-until-march-4th-1825

Browse more rare books from the year 1824


      Home     Wants Manager     Library Search     561 Years   Links     Contact      Search Help      Terms of Service     


Copyright © 2017 viaLibri™ Limited. All rights reserved.