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Displayed below are some selected recent viaLibri matches for books published in 1890

        Physiologie des exercices du corps

      Paris, Félix Alcan, 1890, in-8, VIII, 372 pages suivies de 32 pages de catalogue Alcan, percaline bordeaux de l'éditeur, titre doré en médaillon sur le premier plat, Quatrième édition de cet ouvrage paru pour la première fois en 1888 et par le biais duquel Fernand Lagrange souhaite "établir des règles et formuler des méthodes pour l'application rationnelle de l'exercice musculaire, selon les cas et les sujets". Pour ce faire, il divise son livre en six parties : le travail musculaire, la fatigue, l'accoutumance au travail, les différents exercices, les résultats de l'exercice, et le rôle du cerveau dans l'exercice. Cet ouvrage constitue le tome 60 de la "Bibliothèque scientifique internationale". Fernand Lagrange (1845-1909) étudia les exercices physiques en fonction de la physiologie organique, et non de la mécanique, ce qui était novateur pour l'époque. Intérieur portant des rousseurs

      [Bookseller: Librairie Alain Brieux]
 1.   Check availability:     maremagnum.com     Link/Print  


        Around the World with Nellie Bly

      Massachusetts: Milton Bradley Co. c 1890s. A rare board game based on the adventures of Nellie Bly. Bly (1867-1922) had taken up the challenge in 1890 to travel round the world faster than the men who had gone before her. After circling the globe in precisely seventy-two days, six hours, and eleven minutes she became a well known identity. This attractive game, produced by the Milton Bradley Company, celebrates her considerable achievements. Geographical game, original cloth box, colour-printed pictorial lid with rules printed on inside, 420mm x 400mm, original spinning-wheel die, 4 later counters, colour lithograph on board, 400mm x 415mm; box at some time neatly repaired and canvas sides strengthened, overall in very good condition.

      [Bookseller: Rare Illustrated Books]
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        Africa. No. 8A (1890). Translations of Protocols and General Act of the Slave Trade Conference held at Brussels, 1889-90; with annexed Declaration. Presented to both Houses of Parliament by command of Her Majesty. August 1890. [C.-6049-I].

      London, printed for Her Majesty's Stationery Office, by Harrison and Sons, 1890. - Folio. (2), 191, (1) pp. Sewn, with remains of former spine. English-language Protocols and General Act of the 1889/1890 Brussels Conference, at which the European colonial powers, Russia, Turkey, and Persia came together to counteract the slave trade in Africa. Note on the title-page: "The Annexes to the Protocols have not been translated: but the Originals will be found in 'Africa No. 8 (1890).'" - A good copy. Lorimer, Gazetteer of the Persian Gulf, Vol. I. Historical, Part II, Appendix R. Books of Reference. IV. Anonymous Official Works, 606 [p. 2733; under Slave Trade].

      [Bookseller: Antiquariat INLIBRIS Gilhofer Nfg. GmbH]
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        Zum Zeitvertreib fur brave Knaben & Madschen Ein Ziehbilderbuch

      Munich: Verlag Braun & Schneider, 1890. Boards. Orig. publisher's pictorial boards colored in red, black and blue with cloth backstrip renewed. Very good.. Unpaginaged. 33 x 25 cm. Cover title, a pop-up book with eight full-page chromolithographed plates, each with a movable tab to set the scene in motion. The poems describing each plate are captioned: Die Gouvernante, Der Billardspieler, Der Schmetterlingsfanger, Der Gratulant, Der vergessene Hausshlussel Der durstige Kasperl, Der genfangene Turko, and Der Apfeldieb. "There is little doubt that the most elaborate and ingenious movables ever produced were those of the German Lothar Meggendorfer (1847-1925) made during the 1880s and 1890s....the mechanisms and operations of Meggedorfer's books - not to mention the originality of the figures -- are far superior to any others published before or since. The devices that operated the various figures in his books consisted of a series of inter-connecting cardboard levers sandwiched between the coloured illustration on the front of the oblong leaf and the dummy pasted behind it. The animated limbs and heads were cut-out models on the front of the picture, and moving the tab set the whole scene in motion [see: HAINING, Movable Books, pp.65-73]. Overall a clean copy with all tabs functional.

      [Bookseller: Royoung bookseller, Inc.]
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        (Wien 1858 - 1933 München). Rast vor dem Wirtshaus. Öl auf Holz. Unten rechts signiert und bezeichnet \'München\'. 13 x 16,5 cm. Im breiten Holzrahmen.

       1890 Blick in die Dorfstraße eines bayerischen Dorfes unter bewölktem Himmel. Rechts vor dem Wirtshaus Pferde an der Heuraufe und Menschen bei der Rast und im Gespräch, auf der Straße ebenfalls eine Begegnung sowie Enten und Hühner.- Verso mit altem Stempel \'Galerie Herman (?), Frankfurt a.M.\'.- Dabei ein Inventarzettel des Auktionshauses Dorotheum von 2005.- Aus der Sammlung Häusler, Kiel. Versand D: 5,00 EUR

      [Bookseller: Antiquariat Schramm]
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        Album für Liebigbilder. 100 Serien à 6 Bilder.

      Leipzig, Ernst Heidtmann, Um 1890 - Ca. 27,5 x 27 cm. (2) S., (100) Seiten mit 600 eingelegten chromolithographierten Bildchen. Orig.-Leinenband. U.a. mit folgenden Serien: Joh. Strauss; Wintermärchen von Shakespeare; Lohengrin; Parsifal; Die Maske; Erzeugung des Feuers; Zur Geschichte der Goldschmiedekunst; Im Reiche der Nähnadel; Der Kautschuk; Zur Geschichte des Papiers; Parlamente; Hervorragende Brückenbauten; Bismarck; Nationalhymnen; Österr. Volkstrachten und Städte; Gebirgsvolk in Norwegen; Aus dem Lande der Pharaonen; Virtuosen der Tonkunst; Physikalische Spielereien; Weihnachten; Alpen-Blumen; Vogelnester; Sternbilder; Seefische; Carnevals-Serenaden; Drachenabenteuer; Reise um die Welt; Einband stärker bestoßen, etwas fleckig, mit größerem Eckabriss, Rücken durchgehend aufgeplatzt.Titelblatt mit Namenszug. Handschriftlicher Inhaltsverzeichnis der Bilder verso Titelblatt. Trägerpapier gebräunt und teils etwas angerändert, die lose in den vorgesehenen Halterungen eingelegten Bildchen teils etwas knitterfaltig oder bestoßen, jedoch überwiegend in gutem Zustand. [Attributes: Hard Cover]

      [Bookseller: Rainer Kurz - Antiquariat]
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        Philae.

      Cairo, J.P.Sebah, ca. 1890. Original photograph, albumen print, 26,3 x 34,5 cm, rubberstamp signed, titled and numbered (1114) on front. KEYWORDS:egypt/philae/photo.

      [Bookseller: Krul Antiquarian Books]
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        MIDNIGHT AND NOONDAY OR DARK DEEDS UNRAVELED. GIVING TWENTY YEARS EXPERIENCE ON THE FRONTIER; ALSO THE MURDER OF PAT HENNESEY, AND THE HANGING OF TOM SMITH, AT RYLAND'S FORD, AND FACTS CONCERNING THE TALBERT RAID ON CALDWELL. ALSO THE DEATH DEALING CAREER OF MCCARTY AND INCIDENTS HAPPENING IN AND AROUND CALDWELL, KANSAS, FROM 1871 UNTIL 1890

      Caldwell: Published By G. D. Freeman, 1890., 1890. First edition. First edition. First printing with the word "Talbert" misprinted in the title. 8vo. Rebound in maroon cloth with new endpapers, and titles stamped in gold gilt on the spine [1-405 pp., 20.2 x 14.5 cm. frontispiece. three illustrations, "Author's Preface," index to chapters. "Talbert" mis-spelled in the title. Six Score 39 says "An extremely rare history of Caldwell during this vital period, when it was an important cattle town, and a first hand account of one of the roughest of the shipping terminals." Herd 843 says "Exceedingly rare." Streeter Sale 2030 says ".... rare ... this important account of the Kansas frontier. The work is usually known by the second edition of 1892." Adams One Fifty 56 says "The book contains much material on the gunmen and their gun battles in Cadlwell [sic] and tells of the Medicine Lodge bank robbery by Henry Brown and Ben Wheeler. I was fortunate enough in my early 1940s to pick up a copy of the first edition in California, and it is the only one I have ever seen." Inked Christmas gift inscription and dated "Dec. 25, 1891," else near fine, tight copy of the first issue of the first edition, with contents in very nice condition.

      [Bookseller: BUCKINGHAM BOOKS]
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        Niagara Falls: Thirty-Six Fine Views from Negatives Made Especially For This Work

      Unpag. volume containing 36 leaves of collotype plates depicting views of the Falls, many in winter, including Prospect Point, Horseshoe Fall, Cave of the Winds, the American and Canadian Falls, whirlpools, Dufferin Islands, bridges, and the Falls under snow and ice. Ink stamp and pencil notation to front endpaper. 4to. Cloth, bumped corners, professionally repaired with cloth tape along spine and to endpapers. N.p. (Niagara Falls?) n.d. (circa 1890's). Together with two photographs on cardstock from H. F. Nielson, "Manufacturers of all kinds of paper & glass views of Niagara Falls" Tourism to Niagara Falls became popular in the 19th century, and by the middle of the century was the main industry in the area. The first suspension bridge over the Niagara River was built by Charles Ellet in 1848, and supplanted by another suspension bridge in 1855. After the Civil War, the New York Central Railroad advertised Niagara Falls as a vacation and honeymoon destination, and as a result, the first railway bridge was constructed in 1886. The first steel archway bridge, the Whirlpool Rapids Bridge, was completed in 1897. It still carries cars, trains, and pedestrians through Canadian Customs Border Control today. As of June 2017, WorldCat locates two holdings in North American institutions.

      [Bookseller: F.A. Bernett Books]
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        Zoo Puzzle

      - Germany, [ca 1890]. Cardboard full colour printed box with six compartments separated by a wooden frame, each containing three puzzles (colour printed paper on wood), for a total of 18 puzzles, each measuring 12 x 11 cm (4" x 3.5").l The word "Germany" is printed on the box in the lower right corner of the figure. No publisher or manufacturer is indicated. The images include typical zoo scenes, most animals illustrated behind bars, including a lion, a tiger, monkeys, bears, a camel, pelicans, an ostrich, a wolf, giraffes, baboons, etc. Box reinforced with transparent tape, top board with two cut-outs on one side (to remove it with more ease). Some dampstaining to the bottom. One piece with a repair, otherwise a fine, complete set.

      [Bookseller: Antiquariaat Schierenberg]
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        Twelve photographic views of Sydney, circa 1890

      Twelve albumen print photographs, each 140 x 200 mm, mounted recto and verso of three nineteenth century album pages, contemporary captions in French beneath most of the images, all are strong prints in fine condition, the pages free from foxing. Includes three superb views of Circular Quay; another of the harbour from Lavender Bay, and animated scenes of Central Railway Station and George Street.

      [Bookseller: Douglas Stewart Fine Books]
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        Ideals of Life in France or How the Great Painters Portray Women in French Art (2 volumes)

      D. APPLETON AND COMPANY, NEW YORK AND LONDON 1890 - ADDITIONAL POSTAGE REQUIRED shipped from atlantic city new jersey ADDITIONAL POSTAGE REQUIRED, leather spine and corners, leather rubbed, shelf worn, corners bumped, gilt on spine, exlibrary number on foot of spine, pages yellowing, numerous full page black and white plates GREAT BLACK AND WHITE ILLUSTRATIONS, no text in volume 2, 73 pages of text in volume 1 DATE PUBLISHED: 1890 EDITION: [Attributes: Hard Cover]

      [Bookseller: Princeton Antiques Bookshop]
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        How the Other Half Lives

      New York: Charles Scribner's Sons, 1890. First Edition. Hardcover. Very Good. First edition, first printing. Trow's printing and Bookbinding Company listed at base of copyright page. Very Good with toning to edges of covers, rubbing to edges of boards and heavy fraying to spine ends, spine cloth dulled. Tissue guard at frontis browned and causing offsetting to adjacent pages (title page and frontis illustration of Gotham Court). Pages toned. A pioneering work of photojournalism documenting New York City's poor lower class living in squalid conditions at the turn of the century.

      [Bookseller: Burnside Rare Books]
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        Hedda Gabler. [Skuespil i fire akter]

      København [Copenhagen]: Glydendalske Boghandels Forlag (F. Hegel & Son), 1890. First Edition. Decorative Cloth. Fine. First Printing of perhaps Ibsen's "most frequently performed play in the modern theatre." (PMM) In Danish (then the literary language of both Denmark and Norway). Small 8vo: [4],236pp. Publisher's green cloth (copies were also identically bound in red, brown, and grey, no known priority), front cover elaborately blocked in gilt and black, back board with blind-stamped borders and central publisher's logo, floral patterned endpapers, gilt edges. A brilliant copy, barely rubbed to spine ends. PMM 375. First trade edition, preceded by twelve copies printed in London, in Norwegian, "under a well-intentioned illusion that this was necessary for copyright protection." (PMM) Published on December 16, 1890, although the play only premiered on January 31, 1891, at the Königliches Residenz-Theater, in Munich. Together with The Lady from the Sea and Rosmersholm, Hedda Gabler forms the Munich trilogy (Ibsen lived in Munich when he wrote them.) The heroines, Ellida, Rebecca, and Hedda, are all determined women, but only Ellida is able to achieve freedom from the consequences of her past actions. Hedda, who, as the play opens, has just married the dull academic Tesman to avoid a spinster's life, realizes that she has trapped herself in a life of impossible tedium, with suicide as her only way out. N. B. With few exceptions (always identified), we only stock books in exceptional condition, carefully preserved in archival, removable polypropylene sleeves. All orders are packaged with care and posted promptly. Satisfaction guaranteed.

      [Bookseller: Fine Editions Ltd]
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        Hedda Gabler.

      Copenhagen: Gyldendalske Boghandels Forlag, 1890. FIRST EDITION. Octavo, pp.[4]; 236. In a contemporary binding of red half morocco over black textured boards, gilt titles and tooling to spine. Internally nice and clean with only very slight paper toning, binding slight rubbed to boards and extremities, a very good copy in a sound binding. PMM Book.

      [Bookseller: Adrian Harrington]
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        Flirt

      Boussod, Valadon & Cie 1890 - - Boussod, Valadon & Cie, Paris 1890, 24,5x33cm, en feuilles sous chemise étui. - Edition originale, un des 20 exemplaires numérotés sur Whatman, les seuls à contenir les illustrations en couleurs, tirage en grand papier le plus restreint. Ouvrage illustré de 19 grands compositions originales hors-texte ainsi que de 18 vignettes originales en bandeaux et culs-de-lampe de Madeleine Lemaire. Notre exemplaire est bien complet, sur la page de faux-titre, de l'aquarelle originale de Madeleine Lemaire qu'elle a signée. L'étui et la chemise comportent des accrocs, des petites taches et des déchirures, un lacet est manquant. Agréable état intérieur. [AUTOMATIC ENGLISH TRANSLATION FOLLOWS] first edition, one of the 20 numbered copies on Whatman, the only ones containing the color illustrations, the most restricted large print. Book illustrated with 19 great original compositions out of text as well as 18 original vignettes in bands and cul-de-lamp Madeleine Lemaire. Our copy is quite complete, on the page of false title, of the original watercolor of Madeleine Lemaire that she signed. The case and the shirt have snags, small spots and tears, a lace is missing. Pleasant interior condition. [Attributes: First Edition; Signed Copy; Soft Cover]

      [Bookseller: Librairie Le Feu Follet]
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        Eigenh. Albumblatt mit U. Baden bei Wien, Jänner 1890.

      1890. 1 S. Gr.-8vo. "In Oesterreichs grünen Landen | Ist froher Sang entstanden | Gar früh mit frischem Ton; | Herrn Walther's helle Klänge | Und Nidhart's Lustgesänge | Die trafen recht ihn schon. || Und sieh'! daß er nicht ende | Am grünen Rebgelände, | Hans Seidl kam, voll Klang; | Hans Vogl ließ erklingen | Sein Lied - mit Lerchenschwingen | Klang d'rein auch mein Gesang!" - Der Vormärz-Lyriker Hermann Rollett wurde wegen revolutionärer Gesinnung polizeilich verfolgt, floh 1845 nach Deutschland und später in die Schweiz. 1854 vorübergehend nach

      [Bookseller: Antiquariat Inlibris]
 17.   Check availability:     maremagnum.com     Link/Print  


        Dirty Jim

      [Hampstead, London]: , 1890. "Dirty Jim" A Fine Original Pen, Ink and Watercolor for Little Ann GREENAWAY, Kate, artist. "Dirty Jim". Original pen, ink and watercolor drawing for "Little Ann". Signed with initials at lower left. No date, no place [Hampstead, London, 1883]. Landscape (10 x 8 3/8 inches; 254 x 213 mm.). Image size: 4 3/8 x 3 1/2 inches; 111 x 89 mm. This fine watercolor appears on page 24 of Little Anne. London, 1883. "There was one little Jim, 'Tis reported of him, And must be to his lasting disgrace, That he never was seen With hands at all clean, Nor yet ever clean was his face. His friends were much hurt To see so much dirt, And often they made him quite clean; But all was in vain, He got dirty again, And not at all fit to be seen. It gave him no pain To hear them complain, Nor his own dirty clothes to survey: His indolent mind No pleasure could find In tidy and wholesome array. The idle and bad, Like this little lad, May love dirty ways, to be sure: But good boys are seen To be decent and clean, Although they are ever so poor." "From early 1883 onwards, Ruskin became the most important influence in Kate's life. He wrote to her "My dear Kate... when can you come and see Mountain Spring? Another year, you must come for the snow drops; but it must be a year of bright frost, not black rain... April would be best but I want to be sure of you, and I know you cannot command your time in the chances of book work - so I'll fit my plans to yours." ...Meanwhile she was bust preparing her next book, encouraged by her recent financial success. In late January Evans sent a cheque for £287.17.6d., marked 'half profit in 76,403 copies of those books in print' - which included recent German editions of the Birthday Book and Mother Goose. She accepted Evans's suggestion and planned to illustrate fifty favourite childhood verses by Jane and Ann Taylor, for a book she called Little Ann and Other Poems. Kate Greenaway arrived at Ruskin's home, Brantwood on April 10th, 1883. ...she left , not a fortnight, but nearly a month later, feeling she knew Ruskin the man - an enigmatic figure with piercing blue eyes, a caressing voice and the limitless charm that helped her to overcome her timidity and her desire to return to London. He made every possible effort to make her comfortable, and flattered her by listening to her ideas on art, nature and life... Kate wandered freely about the grounds, drawing flowers or the dancing children of Coniston Hall; her work only occasionally encouraged by Ruskin. Although he had 'all kinds of plans in my head for her', he sank back into a growing moodiness that Kate noticed but tried to ignore." Because of these strained silences, when her visit ended Ruskin was doubtful of its results. He wrote in his diary: 'May 8 Tuesday... Kate Greenaway went home yesterday - I fear not much wiser for her visit. But Kate could only recall her ecstatic happiness at Brantwood, as she wrote to Lily Evans how she regretted leaving... While waiting for news of Ruskin's lecture, Kate accepted further commissions. Austin Dobson, who was by this time a great admirer of her work, persuaded her to illustrate two poems he had written that had been inspired by her children. Their collaborations appeared twice, in the January and the May issues of the Magazine of Art, the latter being a full page verse description of Kate's inimitable world, with Greenaway children scattered in the margin... Kate also worked daily on Little Ann and the year's Almanack, all the while looking out for a letter from Ruskin... but it was Stacy Marks who gave her the assurances that Ruskin now failed to offer. He wrote to thank her for Little Ann, which he thought was 'on the whole, I might say entirely, your best book..." (Rodney Engen. Kate Greenaway. A Biography, pp. 86-104). One of the few artists to gain true celebrity from illustrating children's books, Kate Greenaway was one of the most influential illustrators of her age. Greenaway, along with Randolph Caldecott and Walter Crane, revolutionized illustration. Popular in both Europe and the United States, Greenaway has remained highly sought after, even among contemporary children's book collectors. (Vic Zoschak).

      [Bookseller: David Brass Rare Books, Inc.]
 18.   Check availability:     Biblio     Link/Print  


        Ein newes und nu¨tzlichs Ertzney, Kunst, und Wunderbuch, deszgleichen hiebevorn nicht gesehen, darinnen neben allerley Alchymistischen und andern Ku¨nsten, wunderbarlichen Sachen, und Historien, ...(colophon: Mühlhausen, printed by Andreas Hanksch for Henning Gross,) 1590. With: (2) BAPST, Michael . Gifftjagendes Kunst unnd Haussbuch, darinnen zu befinden, wie man allerley gifftige schedliche Würme vertreiben, auch mancherley wilde Thiere, Fische, und Vogel künstlich fangen, unnd tödten sol; ...Leipzig, (colophon: printed by Zacharias Bärwald for Henning Grosse), 1591. 2 works in 1 volume. 4to. Contemporary vellum.

      Schubert & Sudhoff, "Michael Bapst von Rochlitz" in: Neues Archiv für Sächsige Geschichte XI (1890), pp. 86-88; ad 1: Brüning 612; VD16, B300; ad 2: Dürling 462; VD16, B296. First edition of a medical and alchemical recipe book intended for use at home, combined with the first edition of its sequel, devoted to poisons. As a medical amateur, Bapst based his recipe book mostly on other authors and stated in a later publication that he had not time to test all his prescriptions, and therefore "it may well have happened that now and then there be some mistakes" (Schubert & Sudhoff). If thereupon the reader would discover any incorrect recipe, this would be entirely the original author's fault. Since the book could be consulted for such diverse matters as nose-bleeding, tooth-ache, the taming of leopards, fishing, invisible writing and giving copper the appearance of silver, this is entirely understandable. In his second volume Bapst followed up on the formula of the first book and gave advise on spider stings, driving out wolves, bites of lions, fishing bait, killing bats, diarrhoea in chickens, preserving fruit and meat, fishing frogs and a great deal about worms.Michael Bapst (1540-1603) was a Protestant preacher in Mohorn in Saxony, and published numerous books containing medical and alchemical recipes. He considered himself an authority on alchemistic matters but at the same time copied recipes prepared by other authors. In a posthumous publication from 1605 even he finds one of his recipes against cramp - eating lice on bread - too bizarre: "Let him who fancies it try it; I myself would rather be excused" (Schubert & Sudhoff). With the coloured bookplate of Johann Georg von Werdenstein (1542-1608) and an owner's inscription of Maria Catharina von Haslang (1611-1679). Binding slightly loose, with a small shelfnumber pasted on the front. Browned throughout with some spots, a woodworm hole in 7 leaves near the second title-page, the front endpaper loose; in good condition.

      [Bookseller: Antiquariaat FORUM BV]
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        Enim Pascha und die Meuterei in Aequatoria. Neunmonatlicher Aufenthalt und Gefangenschaft in den letzten der Sudan-Provinzen.

      F. A. Brockhaus, Leipzig 1890 - Mit 46 Abbildungen, einer Faksmiletafel (beschädigt) und einer Karte, Ecken leicht bestoßen In deutscher Sprache. 462 S. pages. 23,5 x 15,5 cm [Attributes: Hard Cover]

      [Bookseller: Antiquariat Hans Wäger]
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        Wooden Box with 81 mounted albumen photographs of Java (Dutch Indies) and one dedication leaf in javanese language dedicated to "Fürst Bismarck (e. g. german chancellor Otto von Bismarck).

      Woodbury & Page ca. 1890 - Heavy paper boards (460 x 360 mm) with mounted albumin photographs (image size around 250 x 200 mm) by different photographers but mostly Woodbury & Page (with blindstamp: W. & P. Photografien van Nederland. Indie Batavia). The images of the other photographers are not blindstamped. The handwritten dedication leaf in Javanese with gilt and colored ornaments, dedicated to Otto von Bismarck maybe by a representative of the javanese upper-class. All images titled by hand. Wooden box (500 x 395 x 140 mm) without cover. Fine condition of prints, a few faded, and boards (minor staining) and box A very impressive collection of albumen photographs mainly by Woodbury & Page showing topographical views, genre scenes, market & street scenes, landscapes, portraits of Java with views from Bogor (Buiten-zorg), Borodur, Garut, Jakarta (Batavia), Semerang among others, pictures of batik, railway viaducts, traditional music orchestras, copra production, fruit sales, rice cultivation and harvesting, shadow play actors & dancers, theater performances and many more of ethnology interest. Among the images are por-traits of "Prince of Djocia in Old Javanese costume", "Sultan of Solo" and "Prince of Lombok, deposed in 1895 and deported to Bavia. A very fine and important photographic survey of the Dutch East Indies. An invaluable historical, social, political and cultural resource brought together for Otto von Bismarck. Most of the images bear the blind-stamp of Woodbury & Page, but also included are photographs of other photographer, mainly of ethnographic interest. Walter B. Woodbury (1834-1885), a Mancunian by birth, is the earliest known photographer of the Dutch East Indies. Aged 18 Woodbury emigrated to Australia in the hope of making his fortune in the Australian gold-fields. However, he was sidetracked by his passion for photography and became one of the leading expo-nents of the wet-plate process. He went on to hone his skills whilst living in Melbourne and, in 1854, won a medal at the Melbourne Exhibition which resulted in his decision to turn to photography professionally. Whilst in Melbourne he met his future associate, James Page, another British expatriate photographer, and both agreed to leave Australia in 1857 for Batavia and established their studio, Woodbury & Page, in the same year. After mastering the use of wet collodion plates in tropical conditions, Woodbury & Page went from strength to strength. Their work was acclaimed in The British Journal of Photography who reported that it was the first "to show the beauties of tropical scenery ever introduced to [England]" (BJP, 18 September, 1885, p. 596) and, in 1859, their photographs were marketed in England by Negretti & Zambra (scientific instrument makers to the Queen). After a short spell back in the UK, Woodbury returned to Java in 1860 and travelled extensively throughout the central and west of the country with Page and his brother, Henry James Woodbury (1836-1873). By 1861 the studio was moved to new premises and renamed Photographisch Atelier van Walter Woodbury where it remained until the company was liquidated in 1908. In 1863 Woodbury returned to England with his Javanese wife and, for the next 12 years, went on to invent prolifically (taking out patents for, amongst other things, optical kaleidoscopes, photographic apparatus and even musical railway signals). His breakthrough came with his patent for the Woodburytype in 1864, the photomechanical printing process which became the most commonly used method to illustrate fine books between 1870 and 1900. Comprising views in Batavia and western Java, including: a group portrait of seated Javanese officials from Serang, Banten; a mosque at Banten; the Governor General's Palace, images around Buitenzorg, a moun-tainous city to the south of Batavia (which, by the end of the nineteenth century, was one of the most developed and westernized cities in Indonesia). Other images are from west Java, including Bandoeng, Tjitjalengka, [Attributes: Soft Cover]

      [Bookseller: Antiquariat Thomas Mertens]
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        The Species of Pedicularis of the Indian Empire and Its Frontiers.

      Calcutta : Bengal Secretariat Press 1890 - Folio. Bound in contemporary quarter black leather. Gilt lettering on spine. 4 raised bands. Marbled boards. In protective mylar. Good binding and cover. Minor wear to extremities. Front board starting. Japanese character stamp on title page. Pencil notation on title page dating purchase from bookstore in Japan, 1951. 196 pages : illustrations ; 35 cm. Clean, unmarked pages with tanning. Sir David Prain M.D., FRS was a Scottish physician and botanist. Prain duly went to India as a physician / botanist in the Indian Medical Service, and in 1887 was appointed curator of the Calcutta herbarium. In 1898 he was promoted director of the Royal Botanic Garden, Calcutta as well as the Botanical Survey of India, and superintendent of Cinchona Cultivation in Bengal, remaining there until 1905. From 1898 to 1905 he also served as Professor of Botany at the Medical College of Calcutta. In 1905 he became Director of the Royal Botanic Gardens, Kew. Pedicularis is a genus of perennial green root parasite plants currently placed in the broomrape family Orobanchaceae (the genus previously having been placed in Scrophulariaceae). The highest diversity is in eastern Asia, with 352 species accepted in China alone. [Attributes: First Edition; Hard Cover]

      [Bookseller: Sequitur Books]
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        BASE BALL THIS AFTERNOON. HARVARD VS. YALE GAME BEGINS AT 3.30 ADMISSION, 50¢ RESERVED SEATS AT BEERS & RANKIN

      [New Haven]: Price, Lee & Co., 1890. Broadside, 9 1/4 x 6 1/2 inches. Matted and framed under plexiglass, 15 x 12 inches. Quarto. Old folds, a few minor chips along folds (just affecting a few letters), moderate browning, moderate dampstain at bottom. A good copy, in a modern frame. Not examined out of the frame. A rare late 19th-century broadside advertising a baseball game between Yale and Harvard to be played in New Haven. A rare college sports broadside, no copies recorded on OCLC.

      [Bookseller: William Reese Company - Americana]
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        Journal of Charlotte Cleveland describing her voyage from London to Launceston, 9 April - 4 August 1852.

      A hitherto unknown manuscript copy of Charlotte Cleveland's famous journal, apparently commissioned by her daughter Edith, probably between 1890 and 1900. Late nineteenth century notebook. Small octavo, original black cloth card covers (now detached); manuscript in ink on ruled paper, pp [1], 1-117, [4], 118-140; first page inscribed in ink in the hand of Charlotte Cleveland's daughter, Edith (later Mrs. J.W. Debenham) 'My Mother's journal of journey from London to Launceston 1852', with a modern inscription beneath in pen which traces the line of ownership of this copy from Edith to her daughter, Jessie Debenham (later Mrs. John Stephen Macrae); page 1 of the manuscript titled 'A Narrative of a voyage from London to Port Philip (sic)'; the last of the 4 unnumbered pages between 117 and 118 with an apologetic note by the copyist, who identifies herself as Mrs. Wellford, explaining that she has inadvertently forgotten to number them; the journal is complete and extremely well preserved. Charlotte Cleveland, née Barry (1819-1884), who emigrated to Launceston in Van Diemen's Land with her husband William Charles Cleveland on the Mermaid in 1852, was a significant Tasmanian colonial artist. A number of her works in pencil or pencil and wash have survived. These views of buildings and landscapes in Launceston, Hobart and other locations are acknowledged as being historically important, perhaps none more so than her sketch of the Signal Station on Windmill Hill, which is the only known depiction of the building. The artist lived in Launceston from 1852 until 1864, then in Melbourne until 1877; she then returned with her husband to Launceston, remaining there until her death in 1884. The original of Charlotte Cleveland's ship board journal, kept during her outward voyage in 1852, remains in private hands. Clifford Craig, in his article Charlotte Cleveland 1819-1884 : an early Tasmanian artist, published in Papers and Proceedings of the Royal Society of Tasmania, volume 100, 1966, notes that Charlotte's original journal was (at the time his article was published) in the possession of her grandson, A.H. Weedon, of Tatana, near Launceston. LINC Tasmania (as part of the Launceston Manuscript Collection) holds a photocopy of the original manuscript. It has been transcribed by Gill Morris and published as The Journals of Charlotte Cleveland (Friends of the Library, Launceston 2006). The diary of William Cleveland is held in the Mitchell Library.

      [Bookseller: Douglas Stewart Fine Books]
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        Die wahre Geschichte vom wiederhergestellten Kreuz. Herausgegeben von Ernst Gottlieb und Felix Guggenheim.

      49 (1) Seiten 4, gebundene Ausgabe, Original-Halb-Ledereinband mit goldgeprägtem Rückentitel. das Buch in seiner Originalbindung, lediglich die unteren Kanten leicht bestossen sowie auf dem Innendeckel Signatur des Vorbesitzers und Lichtschatten, ansonsten sauber und frisch. Eines von einhundertfünfzig in Halbleder gebundenen und vom Autor signierten Exemplaren - hier die Nummer 34. Franz Viktor Werfel (* 10. September 1890 in Prag/Tschechien - + 26. August 1945 in Beverly Hills/USA) war ein österreichischer Schriftsteller jüdisch-deutschböhmischer Herkunft. Er ging aufgrund der nationalsozialistischen Herrschaft ins Exil und wurde 1941 US-amerikanischer Staatsbürger. Er war ein Wortführer des lyrischen Expressionismus.

      [Bookseller: Bührnheims Literatursalon GmbH]
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        Views and portraits taken in Queenscliff and Melbourne by Dr. MacDougall, Victorian Artillery, 1890s

      A group of 18 photographs by amateur photographer Dr. Ronald MacDougall, Surgeon-Captain of the Victorian Artillery, Queenscliff; comprising 14 albumen prints and 4 bromide prints, most large format, laid down on 7 original album leaves of thick card, with MacDougall's accompanying manuscript captions; the prints are in very good condition overall, with occasional foxing. This important photographic archive dates to between 1890 and 1900, and appears to represent MacDougall's entire photographic legacy. Of significance for the social history of both Queenscliff and St. Kilda, it includes the following subjects: Two views of the house and grounds of 'Corinella', Tennyson Street, St. Kilda, the residence of the Lewers Family; each 230 x 280 mm; albumen prints. (MacDougall married Miss Jessie Lewers of 'Corinella' in September 1892. The residence was demolished in the twentieth century). View of Queenscliff, Point Lonsdale in the distance; 240 x 290 mm; beneath the image "Photographed by Dr. Ronald MacDougall"; albumen print. Fisherman's quarters, Queenscliff; 240 x 290 mm; albumen print. Beach at Queenscliff; 240 x 290 mm; albumen print. Lighthouse & Fort, Queenscliff, looking south, Point Nepean in the distance; 240 x 290 mm; albumen print. Residence of Doctor R. MacDougall, Queenscliff; 240 290 mm; albumen print. Her Majesty's SS. Vulcan, used for laying mines; 240 x 290 mm; albumen print. Queenscliff Lighthouse; 290 x 240 mm; albumen print. New jetty, Queenscliff; 155 x 200 mm; albumen print. Dr. Ronald MacDougall in his military uniform. Three self-portraits; each approximately 180 x 130 mm; albumen prints. The late Captain Boothby, Victorian Artillery; 150 x 100 mm; albumen print. (Probably taken in a studio by a professional photographer) Blanche Watson, daughter of George Watson of St. Kilda, Master of Melbourne Hounds and "Prince of Starters" at metropolitan horse race meetings; 240 x 290 mm; bromide print. Limestone rocks at Nepean Point; 240 x 290 mm; bromide print. Wreck of the Holyhead. "A man in it went twice to Australia and each time was wrecked in the spot near Queenscliff"; 200 x 150 mm; bromide print. Gum trees at Yarra Creek near Queenscliff; 160 x 210 mm; bromide print.

      [Bookseller: Douglas Stewart Fine Books]
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        Notre coeur

      Paul Ollendorff 1890 - - Paul Ollendorff, Paris 1890, 12x19cm, relié. - Edition originale, un des 150 exemplaires numérotés sur Hollande, seuls grands papiers après 5 Japon. Reliure en demi maroquin vert menthe à coins, dos à cinq nerfs sertis de filets dorés et orné de triples caissons dorés agrémentés d'entrelacs dorés, date dorée en queue, encadrement de filets dorés sur les plats de papier marbré, gardes et contreplats de papier à la cuve, tête dorée sur témoins, couvertures et dos conservés, ex-libris encollé en tête d'un contreplat, reliure de l'époque signée de Champs. Page de faux-titre et dernière page de texte intégralement ombrées à l'instar de tous les exemplaires en raison de la texture des couvertures. Agréable exemplaire joliment établi. Provenance : de la bibliothèque A. Grandsire avec son ex-libris encollé sur un contreplat. [AUTOMATIC ENGLISH TRANSLATION FOLLOWS] first edition, one of 150 numbered copies on Holland paper, only large papers after 5 Japan. Binder in half morocco green mint with corners, back with five nerves set with golden fillets and adorned with triple gilded boxes decorated with golden interlacings, date golden in tail, framing of golden nets on the plates of marbled paper, guards and counterplates of paper To the vat, golden head on witnesses, blankets and backs preserved, ex-libris glued to the head of a plywood, binding of the signed time of Champs. False title page and last full shadow text page. Nice copy nicely established. Origin: from the A. Grandsire library with its ex-libris pasted on a flat. [Attributes: First Edition; Hard Cover]

      [Bookseller: Librairie Le Feu Follet]
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        (Wien 1854 - 1912). Junge Liebe. Öl auf Leinwand. Um 1890. Unten links signiert. 100 x 45 cm. Im prachtvollen Goldrahmen mit Messingschildchen.

       1890 Carl Schweninger entstammte einer Wiener Künstlerfamilie, war der Sohn des Malers Carl Schweninger d. Ä. Zuerst lehrte ihn sein Vater, später studierte er bei Karl Mayer an der Allgemeinen Malerschule der Akademie der bildenden Künste Wien. Seine Motive waren hauptsächlich Rokoko-Genreszenen. Viele seiner Bilder wurden in Zeitschriften wie \'Die Gartenlaube\', \'Ueber Land und Meer\' und \'Moderne Kunst\' veröffentlicht.- Im Garten vor einer Steinmauer lehnt eine junge Schönheit im leichten weißen Kleid, eine Brust entblößt, einen Arm vor die Stirn haltend, der andere wird am Handgelenk von einem jungen Mann festgehalten, der hinter der Mauer steht und der jungen Frau zugeneigt ist.- Verso Reste eines alten Aufklebers der Galerie Commeter in Hamburg, dieser handschriftlich bezeichnet mit Künstlernamen und dessen Lebensdaten sowie betitelt \'Junge Liebe\'.- Dabei ein Kaufbeleg vom Auktionshaus Schloss Ricklingen aus dem Jahr 1998.- Aus der Sammlung Häusler, Kiel.- Versand D: 5,00 EUR

      [Bookseller: Antiquariat Schramm]
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        Frederick Douglass, two days after his speech "The Race Problem" held at Washington, pens a letter to Ebenezer Bassett, the first African-American diplomat

      Washington, DC, October 23, 1890. 5" x 8". "Bi-fold ALS, scripted entirely in the hand of Frederick Douglass, 5"" x 8"". Signed and dated by Frederick Douglass, ""Oct 23rd, 1890"" and signed as ""Frederick Douglass"". Extensively scripted on versos, with both rectos left blank. Lightly toned with the last blank page with slight grubbiness and adhesive ghosting to outer edge. Expected folds. Overall presents bright and clean, near fine. Accompanied by the postmarked mailing envelope, 5"" x 4"", mailed to ""Hon. E.D. Bassett"" , opened to rear flap, and still maintains the original 2cent stamp. Also accompanied by a black and white photo of Frederick Douglass in near fine condition with slight remnants of adhesive to the verso, 5"" x 7"". The set would make an attractive framed display.A fascinating and revealing letter penned by Frederick Douglass later in his career, to Ebenezer Bassett, the first African-American diplomat, and at the time, the ambassador to Haiti. His extensive letter was written just two days after Douglass delivered his infamous speech ""The Race Problem"" presented before the Bethel Literary and Historical Association in the Metropolitan A. M. E. Church, Washington, D.C. October 21, 1890 . His letter references his speech (which is transcribed in its entirely below for review), noting ""By the speech I send you will see that I am not quite played out.""He additionally makes a quick reference to his long and illustrious career, and his age, ""My friends here congratulate me on my good condition. Of course I do not deceive myself or allow them to deceive me about that."" Oddly enough, Douglass also makes reference to being in""detention"", which could allude to anything from not being allowed to travel outside the US, to not transitioning to his new 'position' as he was also given the post of being in charge of d'affaires for Santo Domingo. But what is clear is that Douglas is NOT clear about why he is being detained: ""If I am detained here, as I think I may be, three weeks longer, you can be maturing the necessary correspondences as shall have to send to the State Department soon after my arrival. I am still in the dark about my detention: but this can not last long. I am sure that I am to return to my post whether my stay there shall be long or short.... I almost wish I could go with you but I must obey orders ""The two men who both fought the same fight, saw each other in high regard, and by 1889 Douglas also found himself connected to Haiti when Benjamin Harrison, elected as 23rd President of the U.S. appointed Frederick as Consul General to Haiti. A position he held until 1891.Brilliant, heroic, and complex, Douglass became a symbol of his age and a unique voice for humanism and social justice. His life and thought will always speak profoundly to the meaning of being black in America, as well as the human calling to resist oppression. Born a slave, Douglass escaped at age 20 and went on to become a world-renowned anti-slavery activist. For 16 years he edited an influential black newspaper and achieved international fame as an inspiring and persuasive speaker and writer. In thousands of speeches and editorials, he levied a powerful indictment against slavery and racism, provided an indomitable voice of hope for his people, embraced antislavery politics and preached his own brand of American ideals.His letter to Bassett is shown in full below:""My dear Bassett:Thanks for your letter, I am glad that you have decided to leave for Hayti[sic]. If I am detained here, as I think I may be, three weeks longer, you can be maturing the necessary correspondences as shall have to send to the State Department soon after my arrival. I am still in the dark about my detention: but this can not last long. I am sure that I am to return to my post whether my stay there shall be long or short. I wish you would call Lucie Villa and tele me how you find things there. Kindly remember to Dr. Terres, Mr. ... Battista and all our circle - I almost wish I could go with you but I must obey orders and besides I think it will be wise for me to be touched by the sharp edge of a few frosty mornings here before enduring again a tropical climate. By the speech I send you will see that I am not quite played out. My friends here congratulate me on my good condition. Of course I do not deceive myself or allow them to deceive me about that. Dear Bassett, I fully confide in you to attend to everything about the Legation just the same as if were there. A safe and pleasant voyage to you.Yours very truly,Frederick Douglas""After a life of fighting for the rights of blacks and other minorities (including woman), Frederick Douglass, with the wisdom that only age can bring, was known to have said that ""I am growing old, and am easily satisfied with things as they are. When our young men shall have worked and waited for victory as long as I have worked and waited, they will not only learn to have patience with the men opposed to them, but with me also for having patience with such. I have seen dark hours in my life, and I have seen the darkness gradually disappearing and the light gradually increasing. One by one I have seen obstacles removed, errors corrected, prejudices softened, proscriptions relinquished, and my people advancing in all the elements that go to make up the sum of general welfare. And I remember that God reigns in eternity, and that what ever delays, whatever disappointments and discouragements may come, truth, justice, liberty and humanity will ultimately prevail.""As additional background, below is his famous documented speech delivered just 2 days prior to the writing of this ALS is shown below: THE RACE PROBLEM GREAT SPEECH OF FREDERICK DOUGLASS Delivered before the Bethel Literary and Historical Associationin the Metropolitan A. M. E. Church, Washington, D.C. October 21, 1890 Excerpts* Members and friends of the Bethel Literary and Historical Association: I esteem it a great privilege to be with you and assist in this your first meeting since the close of your last winters term. The organization of your association was an important step in the progress of the colored people in this city. It is an institution well fitted to improve the minds and elevate the sentiments not only of its members, but of the general public. Nowhere else outside of the courts of law and the Congress of the United States have I heard vital public questions more seriously discussed. The men selected to address you know very well that what they may utter is subjected to close scrutiny and severe discussion. Mere rant, bombast, and self-inflation may pass elsewhere, but not here. For this reason, and for my own self-respect, I shall endeavor to say only what I 10 believe to be the truth upon what is popularly called ""The Negro Problem"". . . . It has been well said that in an important sense words are things. They are especially such when they are employed to express the popular sentiment concerning the Negro: to couple his name with anything in this world seems to damage it and damage him likewise. Hence I object to characterizing the relation subsisting between the white and colored people of this country as the Negro problem, as if the Negro had precipitated that problem, and as if he were in any way responsible for the problem. . . . Now that the Union is no longer in danger, now that the North and South are no longer enemies: now that they have ceased to scatter, tear, and slay each other, but sit together in halls of Congress, commerce, religion, and in brotherly love, it seems that the negro is to lose by their sectional harmony and good will all the rights and privileges that he gained by their former bitter enmity. This, it is found, cannot be 20 accomplished without confusing the moral sense of the nation and misleading the public mind; without creating doubt, inflaming passion, arousing prejudice, and attracting to the enemies of the negro the popular sympathy by representing the negro as an ignorant, base, and dangerous person, and by presenting to those enemies that his existence to them is a dreadful problem. With their usual cunning, these enemies of the negro have made the North partly believe that they are now contending with a vast and mysterious problem, the mere contemplation of which should cause the whole North to shudder and come to the rescue. The trick is worthy of its inventors, and has been played for all that it is worth. The orators of the South have gone North and have eloquently described this terrible problem, and the press of the South has flamed with it, and grave Senators from that section have painted it in most distressing colors. Problem, problem, race problem, negro problem, has, as Junius says, fitted through their sentences 30 in all the mazes of metaphorical confusion. . . .. . . The true problem is not the negro, but the nation. Not the law-abiding blacks of the South, but the white men of that section, who by fraud, violence, and persecution, are breaking the law, trampling on the Constitution, corrupting the ballot-box, and defeating the ends of justice. The true problem is whether these white ruffians shall be allowed by the nation to go on in their lawless and nefarious career, dishonoring the Government and making its very name a mockery. It is whether this nation has in itself sufficient moral stamina to maintain its own honor and integrity by vindicating its own Constitution and fulfilling its own pledges, or whether it has already touched that dry rot of moral depravity by which nations decline and fall, and governments fade and vanish. The United States Government made the negro a citizen, will it protect him as a citizen? This is the problem. It made him a soldier, will it honor him as a 40 patriot? This is the problem. It made him a voter, will it defend his right to vote? This is the problem. This, I say, is more a problem for the nation than for the negro, and this is the side of the question far more than the other which should be kept in view by the American people. What these problem orators now ask is that the nation shall undo all that it did by the suppression of the rebellion and in maintenance of the Union. They ask that the nation shall recede from its advance in the path of justice, liberty, and civilization. They boldly ask that what was justly and gratefully given to the negro in the hour of national peril shall be taken from him in the hour of national security. They ask that the nation shall stultify itself and commit an act of national shame which ought to make every lover of his country cry out in bitter indignation and unite as one man to oppose. A demand so scandalous and so shocking to every sentiment of honor and gratitude. And from whom does this demand come? Not 50 from who gave their lives to save the nation, but from those who gave their lives to destroy it. Not from the free and loyal North, but from the rebellious and slave-holding South. Not from the section where men go to the ballot-box with the same freedom from personal danger as they go to church on Sunday, but from that section where personal safety is endangered, where Federal authority is defied, where the amendments to the Constitution are nullified, where the ballot-box is tainted by fraud, and red-shirted intimidation makes a free vote impossible. It comes from the men who led the nation in a dance of blood during four long years, and who now have the impudence to assume to control the destiny of this Republic as well as the destiny of the negro. And what are the reasons they give for demanding of the nation this retreat from its advanced position? They are these: They tell us that they are afraid, very much afraid: they are alarmed, very much alarmed, by the possibility of negro supremacy over them. This is the calamity from which they would be delivered, and with eloquent lips and lusty lungs they are calling out: ""Men and brethren, save us from this threatened and terrible danger!""My reply to this alarm is easy. It is that the wicked flee when no man pursueth: that the thief thinks each bush an officer: that the thing they pretend to fear can never happen, and that blank absurdity is written upon the face of it. The eagle, with fierce talon and bloody beak screaming in terror at the approach of a harmless black bird would not be more absurd and ridiculous. The superior intelligence of the whites, the comparative ignorance of the blacks, the former dominion of the whites and the former subjection of the blacks, the habit of bearing rule of the whites, and the habit of submission by the blacks make black supremacy in any part of our common country utterly impossible. But supposing such an occurrence possible, what hardship would it impose? What wrong would it inflict? Who would be injured by it? If the blacks should get the upper hand, their rule would have to be regulated by the Constitution and the laws of the United States. They could not discriminate against white people on account of race, color, or previous condition without findings the iron hand of the nation laid heavily on their shoulders. The white people of the South are the rich, the negroes the poor; the white people are the landowners, the negroes are the landlers. The white people of the South are numbered with the ruling class of the nation. They have behind them every possible source of power. They have railroads, steamships, electric telegraphs, the Army and the Navy. They have the sword and the purse of the nation behind them, and yet they profess to be shaking in their shoes lest the 8,000,000 of blacks shall come to rule over them and their brethren, the 50,000,000 of whites. Now I am here to say that there is nothing whatever in this supposition. I can hardly call this invention a cunning device, for the pretense is too open, too transparent, too absurd, to rise even to the dignity of low cunning. It is an old ragged pair of trousers, and an old mashed and battered hat of the last century stuck upon a pole in a field where there are neither crows nor corn. It is the cry of fire by the thief when he would divert the officer of the law. It is as I have said, a red herring to divert the hounds from the true game, and the strange thing is that any class of our citizens, white or black, can be deceived by it. . . . But let me say again, the South neither really fears the ignorance of the negro, nor the supremacy of the negro. It is not the ignorant negro, but the intelligent North that it fears; not the supremacy of a different race from itself, but the supremacy of the Republican party. It is not the men who are emancipated but the people who emancipated them that disturb its repose. In other words the trouble is 90 not racial, but political. It is not the race and color of the vote. Disguise this as it may, the real thing that troubles the South is the Republican party, its principles, and its ascendancy in Southern States and the nation. When it talks of negro ignorance, negro supremacy, it means this, and simply this, only this. . . . And now comes Mr. Isaiah Montgomery, of Mississippi, with his solution of the pretended Negro problem.* I have spoken of him elsewhere, and I take back nothing that I have said either of this remarkable man, or his remarkable address. He has surrendered to a disloyal State a great franchise given to himself and his people by the loyal nation. He has taken the work of solving the nation's work of the nation's hands. He has virtually said to the nation: ""You have done wrong in giving us this great liberty. You should give us back a part of our bondage"" He has surrendered a part of his rights to an enemy who will make this surrender a reason for demanding all of his rights. He has conducted his people to a depth 100 from which they will be invited to a lower deep, for if he can rightfully surrender a part of his heritage from the National Government at the bidding of his oppressors, he may surrender the whole. The people with whom he makes this deal are restrained in dealing with the rights of colored men by no sense of modesty or moderation in their demands. They want all that is to be had, and will take all that they can get. Their real sentiment is that no Negro shall or ought to have the right to vote. Yet I have no denunciation for the man Montgomery. He is not a conscious traitor though his act is treason: treason to the cause of the colored people, not only of his own State, but of the United States. I wish the consequences of his act could be confined to Mississippi alone, but I fear this cannot be. Other colored men in other States, dazzled by the fame obtained by Mr. Montgomery through the Democratic press, will probably imitate his bad example. I speak of this Montgomery business more in 110 sorrow than in anger. I hear in the plaintive eloquence of his marvelous address a groan of bitter anguish born of oppression and despair. It is the voice of a soul from which all hope has vanished. His deed kindles indignation to be sure, but his condition awakens pity. He had called to the nation for helphelp which it ought to have rendered and could have rendered but it did notand in a moment of impatience * Isaiah Montgomery, a successful black businessman and former slave, was the only black representative at the 1890 Mississippi constitutional convention, the first of many state conventions called primarily to disenfranchise African Americans. Montgomery voted in favor of disenfranchisement, arguing that the loss of political power would enable blacks to pursue education and economic progress without fear of white opposition and violence. Later that year he joined with Booker T. Washington in founding the National Negro Business League...and despair he has thought to make terms with the enemy, an enemy with whom no colored man can make terms but by a sacrifice of his manhood. . . I am hopeful. I have no doubt whatever of the future. I know that there are times in the history of all reforms when the future looks dark; when the friends of reform are impatient and despondent; when they cannot see the end from the beginning; when the truth that is plain to them compels them to reject the honesty of all who receive it. When they meet with opposition where they expected co-operation; when 120 they met with treachery where they expected fidelity, and defeat where they expected victory. I, for one, have gone through all this. I have had fifty years of it, and yet I have not lost either heart or hope. . . The business of government is to hold its broad shield over all and to see that every American citizen is alike and equally protected in his civil and personal rights. My confidence is strong and high in the nation as a whole. I believe in its justice and in its power. I believe that it means to keep its word with its colored citizens. I believe in its progress, in its moral as well as its material civilization. Its trend is in the right direction. Its fundamental principles are sound. Its conception of humanity and of human rights is clear and comprehensive. Its progress is fettered by no State religion tending to repress liberal thought: by no order of nobility tending to keep down the toiling masses: by no divine right theory tending to national stagnation under the idea of stability. It stands out free and clear with nothing to obstruct its view 130 of the lessons of reason and experience. It may be said, as has been said, that I am growing old, and am easily satisfied with things as they are. When our young men shall have worked and waited for victory as long as I have worked and waited, they will not only learn to have patience with the men opposed to them, but with me also for having patience with such. I have seen dark hours in my life, and I have seen the darkness gradually disappearing and the light gradually increasing. One by one I have seen obstacles removed, errors corrected, prejudices softened, proscriptions relinquished, and my people advancing in all the elements that go to make up the sum of general welfare. And I remember that God reigns in eternity, and that what ever delays, whatever disappointments and discouragements may come, truth, justice, liberty and humanity will ultimately prevail. "

      [Bookseller: University Archives]
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        Finely penned Document signed, in Spanish with translation, to the President of Peru, (1858-1929, née Archduchess of Austria, second wife of Alfonso XII and mother of Alfonso XIII, Queen Regent 1885-1902)

      1890 - (General Andrés Avelino Cáceres, 1836-1923, President 1886-1890 and 1894-1895), informing him of the death of "My most beloved Uncle", (Antoine, Duke of Montpensier, 1824-1890, son of Louis Philippe I, who in 1846 married the Infanta Luisa, 1832-1897, daughter of Ferdinand VII, in one of the 'Spanish marriages' that reminded Europe of those arranged by Louis XIV, and became a naturalized Spaniard), referring to him as "so upright and respected a Prince", 1 side folio black-edged and conjugate blank, Madrid, 21st February right margin a little worn, short closed tear in horizontal fold touching three letters without loss The long regency of Queen Cristina, who was by nature a strong Conservative, owed much to her ability to work with Liberals and to encourage consensus politics between the two main parties. The Duke of Montpensier had been a possible candidate for the throne in 1870, when the crown was settled on Amedeo of Savoy, and Alfonso XII's first wife, who survived the marriage only five months, was his daughter.

      [Bookseller: Sophie Dupre ABA ILAB PADA]
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        Come and Play in the Garden

      [Hampstead, London]: , 1890 - "Come and Play in the Garden"A Fine Original Pen, Ink and Watercolor for Little AnnGREENAWAY, Kate, artist. "Come and Play in the Garden". Original pen, ink and watercolor drawing for "Little Ann". Signed with initials at lower left. No date, no place [Hampstead, London, ca. 1883]. Landscape (9 1/4 x 8 3/4 inches; 236 x 222 mm.). Image size: 4 7/8 x 4 1/2 inches; 124 x 115 mm.This fine watercolor appears on page 51 of Little Anne. London, 1883."Little sister, come away,And let us in the garden play,For it is a pleasant day.On the grass-plat let us sit,Or, if you please, we'll play a bit,And run about all over it.But the fruit we will not pick,For that would be a naughty trick,And very likely make us sick.Nor will we pluck the pretty flowersThat grow about the beds and bowers,Because you know they are not ours.We'll take the daisies, white and red,Because mamma has often saidThat we may gather them instead.And much I hope that we always mayOur very dear mamma obey,And mind whatever she may say."From early 1883 onwards, Ruskin became the most important influence in Kate's life. He wrote to her "My dear Kate?when can you come and see Mountain Spring? Another year, you must come for the snow drops; but it must be a year of bright frost, not black rain? April would be best but I want to be sure of you, and I know you cannot command your time in the chances of book work - so I'll fit my plans to yours." ?Meanwhile she was bust preparing her next book, encouraged by her recent financial success. In late January Evans sent a cheque for £287.17.6d., marked 'half profit in 76,403 copies of those books in print' - which included recent German editions of the Birthday Book and Mother Goose. She accepted Evans's suggestion and planned to illustrate fifty favourite childhood verses by Jane and Ann Taylor, for a book she called Little Ann and Other Poems. Kate Greenaway arrived at Ruskin's home, Brantwood on April 10th, 1883. ?she left , not a fortnight, but nearly a month later, feeling she knew Ruskin the man - an enigmatic figure with piercing blue eyes, a caressing voice and the limitless charm that helped her to overcome her timidity and her desire to return to London. He made every possible effort to make her comfortable, and flattered her by listening to her ideas on art, nature and life? Kate wandered freely about the grounds, drawing flowers or the dancing children of Coniston Hall; her work only occasionally encouraged by Ruskin. Although he had 'all kinds of plans in my head for her', he sank back into a growing moodiness that Kate noticed but tried to ignore." Because of these strained silences, when her visit ended Ruskin was doubtful of its results. He wrote in his diary: 'May 8 Tuesday? Kate Greenaway went home yesterday - I fear not much wiser for her visit. But Kate could only recall her ecstatic happiness at Brantwood, as she wrote to Lily Evans how she regretted leaving? While waiting for news of Ruskin's lecture, Kate accepted further commissions. Austin Dobson, who was by this time a great admirer of her work, persuaded her to illustrate two poems he had written that had been inspired by her children. Their collaborations appeared twice, in the January and the May issues of the Magazine of Art, the latter being a full page verse description of Kate's inimitable world, with Greenaway children scattered in the margin? Kate also worked daily on Little Ann and the year's Almanack, all the while looking out for a letter from Ruskin? but it was Stacy Marks who gave her the assurances that Ruskin now failed to offer. He wrote to thank her for Little Ann, which he thought was 'on the whole, I might say entirely, your best book?"(Rodney Engen. Kate Greenaway. A Biography, pp. 86-104).One of the few artists to gain true celebrity from illustrating children's books, Kate Greenaway was one of the most influential illustrators of her age. Greenaway, along with Randolph Caldecott and Walter Crane, revolutionized illustration. Popular [Attributes: Signed Copy]

      [Bookseller: David Brass Rare Books, Inc.]
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        Meyers Konversationslexikon in 16 Bänden von 1889/1890, plus drei Bände 17/18/19 Register und Supplementbände

      Ecken bestossen und berieben, 4 Bände Rücken oben Einrisse, Bd 15 Rücken unten 3cm Fehlstück, Bd 19 oben kleines Fehlstück, mehrere Beilagen lose, sonst gut erhalten Sprache: deutsch lgk 193_ZeidlerHldr gb mit Goldprägung und schönen Mustern am Rücken, Lederecken, seitlich und unten marmorierter Schnitt, 4. gänzlich umgearbeitete Auflage, durchgehend mit Textzeichnungen, farbigen, teils zweiseitigen Chromlithographien, Holzschnitten, Farbdrucken usw. illustriert, Bd 17: Ergänzungen und Register, Bd 18: Erstes Jahres-Supplement 1890/1891, Bd 19: Zweites Jahres-Supplement 1891/1892, Frakturschrift, pro Band über 1000 S

      [Bookseller: MCM 2000 Buchhandlung u. Antiquariat]
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        [Souvenir album with photographs of the Holy Land, Cairo, Athens and Venice].[Palestine, Cairo, Athens, Venice, ca. 1890]. Oblong album (41.5 x 31 cm) containing 62 albumen prints, mostly 23 x 28 cm, with 2 smaller prints of ca. 16 x 28 and 5 large prints of 35.5 x 27 cm. Most of the photographs are numbered and captioned in French, and sometimes also in English, on the negative. Contemporary brown half morocco.

      Interesting photo album, probably compiled as a souvenir of a journey through the Holy Land, Egypt, Athens and Venice in the 1890s. Complete souvenir albums were sold by photographer's studios and dealers alike. However, the fact that the current album has several blank pages at the end, lacks a binding title and contains photographs showing several different countries, suggests that it was compiled by an individual traveller. Among the photographs of Athens, is an image of the statue of Themis, excavated in 1890 in Rhamnous and subsequently transported to Athens. The inclusion of this photograph suggests the album was compiled in or soon after 1890.The largest part of the album contains photographs of Egypt and Jerusalem. After a view with numerous watermelons at the market of Jaffa, it shows views of Ramlah, Bethany (al-Azariya), Khan al-Ahmar ("scene of the ‘good Samaritan' episode") and the convent Mar Saba. Before the views of Bethlehem on Christmas day, are two photographs showing local inhabitants: a single rider with his horse before the river Jordan and a Bedouin camp near Jericho. All the major sites of Jerusalem are present, including the Mount of Olives, Wailing Wall, Solomon's Stables and the Jaffa Gate with more watermelons. A misplaced image of the coppersmiths of Cairo appears before images of the Al-Aqsa Mosque and the Church of the Holy Sepulchre. The images of Egypt mostly show the river Nile and the Pyramids, but also a busy market in the garden of Gezireh, the interior of the Mosque of Muhammad Ali and a mummy. Typical images of Athens and Venice follow, with the final image showing a gentleman and two ladies feeding the pigeons on the Piazza San Marco.With the captions of several of the photographs transcribed in pencil or ink. Binding worn at the extremities. Paperboard album leaves with a few spots and several tears, most of the header corners damaged and several repaired. Photographs in excellent condition, a few with some spots and light damage at the sides.

      [Bookseller: Antiquariaat FORUM BV]
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        Albumen photographs of a rabbit shooting party c. 1890

      Australia, 1890. Nine photographs approx. 6 1/4 x 4 3/8" mounted on slightly larger stiff card. The views show a group of men obviously enjoying their day out in the bush. The location is unknown, but there is a rather large lake, and the town has a goodly collection of stone buildings, approximately sixteen properties, with some two story homes and a couple of elongated buildings. There is an affectionate view of the shooting party, four men reclining on the ground next to their tent with their border terrier (?), smoking and smiling, a skiff on a lake behind them; the town view with a main street; a bush scene with a lake and a fellow standing beside his tent; a view of gum trees, with a seated man taking aim, a border collie & a lake behind him; a detailed view of the tent, with two shotguns perched in front; two bush scenes and two beside the rather large lake. A bit of light scattered foxing otherwise quite bright.

      [Bookseller: Antipodean Books, Maps & Prints]
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        Come and Play in the Garden

      [Hampstead, London]: , 1890. "Come and Play in the Garden" A Fine Original Pen, Ink and Watercolor for Little Ann GREENAWAY, Kate, artist. "Come and Play in the Garden". Original pen, ink and watercolor drawing for "Little Ann". Signed with initials at lower left. No date, no place [Hampstead, London, ca. 1883]. Landscape (9 1/4 x 8 3/4 inches; 236 x 222 mm.). Image size: 4 7/8 x 4 1/2 inches; 124 x 115 mm. This fine watercolor appears on page 51 of Little Anne. London, 1883. "Little sister, come away, And let us in the garden play, For it is a pleasant day. On the grass-plat let us sit, Or, if you please, we'll play a bit, And run about all over it. But the fruit we will not pick, For that would be a naughty trick, And very likely make us sick. Nor will we pluck the pretty flowers That grow about the beds and bowers, Because you know they are not ours. We'll take the daisies, white and red, Because mamma has often said That we may gather them instead. And much I hope that we always may Our very dear mamma obey, And mind whatever she may say." "From early 1883 onwards, Ruskin became the most important influence in Kate's life. He wrote to her "My dear Kate... when can you come and see Mountain Spring? Another year, you must come for the snow drops; but it must be a year of bright frost, not black rain... April would be best but I want to be sure of you, and I know you cannot command your time in the chances of book work - so I'll fit my plans to yours." ...Meanwhile she was bust preparing her next book, encouraged by her recent financial success. In late January Evans sent a cheque for £287.17.6d., marked 'half profit in 76,403 copies of those books in print' - which included recent German editions of the Birthday Book and Mother Goose. She accepted Evans's suggestion and planned to illustrate fifty favourite childhood verses by Jane and Ann Taylor, for a book she called Little Ann and Other Poems. Kate Greenaway arrived at Ruskin's home, Brantwood on April 10th, 1883. ...she left , not a fortnight, but nearly a month later, feeling she knew Ruskin the man - an enigmatic figure with piercing blue eyes, a caressing voice and the limitless charm that helped her to overcome her timidity and her desire to return to London. He made every possible effort to make her comfortable, and flattered her by listening to her ideas on art, nature and life... Kate wandered freely about the grounds, drawing flowers or the dancing children of Coniston Hall; her work only occasionally encouraged by Ruskin. Although he had 'all kinds of plans in my head for her', he sank back into a growing moodiness that Kate noticed but tried to ignore." Because of these strained silences, when her visit ended Ruskin was doubtful of its results. He wrote in his diary: 'May 8 Tuesday... Kate Greenaway went home yesterday - I fear not much wiser for her visit. But Kate could only recall her ecstatic happiness at Brantwood, as she wrote to Lily Evans how she regretted leaving... While waiting for news of Ruskin's lecture, Kate accepted further commissions. Austin Dobson, who was by this time a great admirer of her work, persuaded her to illustrate two poems he had written that had been inspired by her children. Their collaborations appeared twice, in the January and the May issues of the Magazine of Art, the latter being a full page verse description of Kate's inimitable world, with Greenaway children scattered in the margin... Kate also worked daily on Little Ann and the year's Almanack, all the while looking out for a letter from Ruskin... but it was Stacy Marks who gave her the assurances that Ruskin now failed to offer. He wrote to thank her for Little Ann, which he thought was 'on the whole, I might say entirely, your best book..." (Rodney Engen. Kate Greenaway. A Biography, pp. 86-104). One of the few artists to gain true celebrity from illustrating children's books, Kate Greenaway was one of the most influential illustrators of her age. Greenaway, along with Randolph Caldecott and Walter Crane, revolutionized illustration. Popular in both Europe and the United States, Greenaway has remained highly sought after, even among contemporary children's book collectors. (Vic Zoschak).

      [Bookseller: David Brass Rare Books, Inc.]
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        Art union of pictures by Arthur Streeton. 30 prizes including Spring Pastoral

      [Melbourne : J.T. Buxton, 1890]. Ticket in an art union of thirty pictures, organised by Arthur Streeton and J.T. Buxton, the 1st prize being Streeton's Spring Pastoral, valued at £100; other prizes included hisOcean at Coogee(a.k.a The Blue Pacific, which last sold at auction for over $1 million),Lavender Bayand 8 Hours Procession; the paintings were on view at Buxton's Art Gallery, Swanston Street (the venue for the famous 9 x 5 Impression Exhibition of 1889), where 5/- tickets in the union could be purchased. Single sheet, 160 x 235 mm, printed one side only, one edge perforated, recto with photo-lithographed reproduction of Spring Pastoral, within an Art Nouveau border, letterpress ticket number 372, later annotation at left hand side reads: 'see Streeton correspondence in Mitchell Lib. - Melbourne, under Leitch.'; a very light vertical fold at centre and some mild corner wear at lower right, but overall in very good condition. An extremely rare item of Streeton ephemera, of which we can trace no other copy in Australian collections.The Mitchell Library holds in its collection a ticket issued for Streeton's 1897 art union of pictures - a raffle intended to raise money for Streeton's voyage to England, but which appears not have taken place (seeBUTLER, Roger, Poster Art in Australia, 1993, p 8).

      [Bookseller: Douglas Stewart Fine Books]
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        Le Pamir et sa Faune Lepidopterologique par Gr. Groum-Grshimailo (Tome 4) *First Edition

      St Petersburg: 1890 - First Edition. Contains 21 colour plates and a map. Very Good copy in very good, quarter-leather binding with gilt letttering to the ribbed spine. Uncommon. Very heavy book so overseas postage £30 min. 'We are established reputable First Edition sellers and understand collectors needs in terms of accurate grading and proper packaging' [Attributes: First Edition; Hard Cover]

      [Bookseller: Malden Books]
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        Exposition universelle de 1889. Grand ouvrage illustré, historique, encyclopédique, descriptif.

      Paris, Dentu, 1890. ____ Exemplaire complet des 4 volumes, le dernier est un album de 82 gravures que l'on rencontre rarement. Tous ces volumes sont illustrés par de très nombreuses gravures, dont de nombreuses à pleine page. Une charnière fendue sur 6 cm pour le premier et dernier volume, sinon la série est en bon état.*-------*. 4 volumes in-folio. Collation : portrait, XXXI, 666 / (6), 618 / (6), 670 / (168) pp. Cartonnage toile imprimée grise, titre doré. (Reliure de l'éditeur.).

      [Bookseller: Hugues de Latude]
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        Fine Unsigned Portrait Photograph by W & D Downey, (Oscar, 1854-1900, Irish Poet and Dramatist)]

      1890 - showing him seated at an angle, his right elbow on the back of his chair, three quarter length, full face, his eyes a little to the right with a thoughtful look, in day dress with a flower in his buttonhole, his gloves between his hands, photographer's printed title below, 5½" x 3¾" in margins 10" x 7¾", no place, no date, circa

      [Bookseller: Sophie Dupre ABA ILAB PADA]
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        Recherches sur la Constitution des Spectra d'Émission des Éléments Chimiques. Kongl. SV. Vet. Akademiens Handlinger Band 23. No. II.

      Stockholm Kongl. Boktryckeriet. P. A. Norstedt & Söner 1890 - Tall quarto (300 x 230 mm). Recent burgundy quarter morocco, marbled boards, titles to spine gilt. Title page just a little toned. Excellent condition. First edition of this significant work in which Rydberg lays out the empirical formulae governing the frequencies of spectral lines, a precursor to Bohr's development of the quantum theory. A handsomely bound copy in excellent condition. Johannes Rydberg (1854-1919) was a Swedish physicist at Lund University who studied atomic masses and electromagnetic radiation; inspired by Mendeleev's periodic table, he was convinced that the electromagnetic spectra emitted by atoms could provide insight into atomic structure and theory. "Notwithstanding the imperfect spectroscopic tables then at his disposal, Rydberg discovered most of the important properties of series spectra, including the relation between corresponding series in the spectra of related elements, and foreshadowed discoveries which were made later, when experimental work has sufficiently advanced. Some of the features noted by Rydberg were observed about the same time by Kayser and Runge, but his work had the special merit of connecting different series in the spectrum of the same element into one system, which could be represented by a set of simple formulae having but few adjustable constants. He especially insisted that the hydrogen constant, now generally called the 'Rydberg constant,' should appear in all series and, apart from slight variations from element to element suggested by the theoretical work of Bohr, nearly all subsequent attempts to improve the representation series have involved this supposition, and have had Rydberg's formula as a basis." (Nature obituary, January 24, 1920). Rydberg's work was justified and expanded upon by Neils Bohr's development of the quantum model of atomic structure in 1913, and Bohr was able to use his own theory to derive Rydberg's results, providing confirmation of both. This uncommon publication represents the culmination of Rydberg's work. It "mapped out Rydberg's total approach with remarkable clarity. He conceived of the spectrum of an element as composed of the superposition of three different types of series - one in which the lines were comparatively sharp, one in which the lines were more diffuse, and a third that he called the principle series even though they consisted mostly of lines in the ultraviolet. The first lines were located in the visible spectrum and were usually the most intense. The members of each series might be single, double, triple, or of higher multiplicity. Any particular elementary spectrum might contain any number (even zero) of a series of each of the basic types. While Rydberg observed and measured some spectral lines on his own, he was not particularly noted as an experimental physicist and did not publish any of his experimental investigations or spectroscopic measurements. Most of the data he needed were already available in the voluminous literature. While T. R. Thalen and Bernhard Hasselberg, Rydberg's major Swedish contemporaries in spectral studies, concentrated upon accurate measurements of the spectra of the elements, Rydberg's major spectral contributions were to theory and mathematical form, and those to form were the ones of enduring value" (Dictionary of Scientific Biography, vol. 12, p. 42). [Attributes: First Edition; Hard Cover]

      [Bookseller: Alembic Rare Books]
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        Eigenh. Brief mit U.

      Helmstedt, 20. II. 1890. - 4 SS. auf Doppelblatt. 8vo. An einen namentlich nicht genannten Adressaten: "Überbringer dieses, Herr Kandidat Lippe aus Braunschweig, der in Helmstädt [sic] studirt hat, Kinder-Erziehung mit Liebe, fast mit Enthusiasmus treibt, auch meine Kinder unterrichtet hat, geht an Fallenbergs Institut nach Hofwyl, und wünscht auf seiner Durchreise durch Heidelberg insbesondere auch Sie zu sehen [.] Wohl hätte ich Ihnen schon früher schreiben, und Ihnen meinen Dank für das schöne Geschenk sagen sollen, das Sie mir mit Ihrem Theokrit gemacht haben. Ganz besonders gelungen scheint mir die Übersetzung des kleinen Herakles und der beiden epischen Fragmente einer Herakleis: ich habe sie mit Frau u. Kindern [.] mehrmalen gelesen und meinen Studenten vielleicht als das Vollendetste Ihrer Übersetzungen aufgestellt. Aber nicht wahr? diese 3 Stücke sind nicht von Theokrit. Ich habe den Theokr. ganz durchgelesen und verglichen: diese Fragmente sind aus einer ältern Periode, vor Alexander; es ist ein etwas civilisirterer Humor und warum mich die Stücke mit so anziehen: in keinen Gedichten des Alterthums finde ich so ganz Sie wieder, als in diesen unbeschreiblich anziehenden Versen [.]". - Etwas fleckig.

      [Bookseller: Antiquariat INLIBRIS Gilhofer Nfg. GmbH]
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        Franz von Stuck: Anerkennung (Originalzeichnung)

      1890 - Tusche in Pinsel und Feder sowie Farbstift auf Karton. 48 x 32 cm. Rechts unten signiert. Provenienz: Sammlung Denzel, München Privatsammlung. Veröffentlicht: Fliegende Blätter. Jahrgang 1890, Band 93, Heft 2363, Seite 168 Text: "Schneidiges Bild! Nummer 213! Genau die Nummer meines Regiments!!" BIOGRAFIE: Franz von Stuck (1863 Tettenweis - 1928 München). Vom Müllerssohn zum Malerfürsten – der soziale Aufstieg des aus einfachsten Verhältnissen stammenden Franz Stuck zu einem der angesehensten Künstler der Jahrhundertwende erscheint geradezu märchenhaft. Bereits in der Kindheit zeigt sich Stucks zeichnerisches Talent und wird, was für sein Milieu und die Epoche durchaus nicht selbstverständlich ist, gefördert. Im Anschluss an eine Ausbildung an der Kunstgewerbeschule in München besucht er dort von 1881 bis 1885 die Kunstakademie. Während dieser Zeit entstehen humoristische Beiträge für illustrierte Zeitschriften sowie Entwürfe für das Mappenwerk Allegorien und Embleme. Dieses zeugt sowohl vom Sinn des angehenden Künstlers für ornamentale Wirkung als auch von seiner Vorliebe für phantastisch-mythologische Bildwelten, die fortan sein Schaffen bestimmen und ihn weithin bekanntmachen werden. Der offizielle Durchbruch gelingt Stuck 1889 mit dem auf der Jahresausstellung im Münchner Glaspalast gezeigten Gemälde „Der Wächter des Paradieses“ (Museum Villa Stuck), das als idealisiertes, lebensgroßes Selbstporträt des Künstlers angelegt ist und mit einer Goldmedaille ausgezeichnet wird. In den kommenden Jahren kann er seine Stellung im offiziellen Kunstbetrieb als Mitbegründer der Münchner Sezession 1892, durch seine Ernennung zum Akademieprofessor 1895 und nicht zuletzt durch den Bau seiner herrschaftlichen Villa an der Prinzregentenstraße 1897/98 weiter ausbauen. In dem nach eigenen Plänen gestalteten Prachtbau verwirklicht Stuck seine Vorstellungen vom Gesamtkunstwerk, in dem Architektur, Malerei und Plastik eine symbiotische Einheit bilden. Die Bedeutung des 1905 in den persönlichen Adelsstand erhobenen Zeichners, Malers und Bildhauers Franz von Stuck liegt in der unerreichten Meisterschaft, die Grenzen zwischen bildender und angewandter Kunst mit einem untrüglichen Gespür für das Dekorative aufzuheben. Die von ihm in der Nachfolge von Arnold Böcklin und Max Klinger geschaffenen symbolistischen Bildwelten sind Ausdruck der Sehnsucht nach einer schönheitstrunkenen Welt zwischen Heroismus und Hedonismus. Mit Gemälden wie „Die Sünde“ (Neue Pinakothek München), „Der Krieg“ (Neue Pinakothek München) oder „Der Kuss der Sphinx“ (Museum der Bildenden Künste Budapest) und Skulpturen wie dem „Verwundeten Kentaur“ oder der „Reitenden Amazone“ hat er Ikonen der Kunst um 1900 geschaffen, deren Ästhetik bis heute eine faszinierende Anziehungskraft ausübt. [Attributes: Signed Copy]

      [Bookseller: Kunkel Fine Art]
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