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        The Dabistan, or School of Manners, translated from the Original Persian, with Notes and Illustrations.

      Paris: Printed for the Oriental Translation Fund of Great Britain and Ireland, 1843 - 3 volumes, tall octavo. Original green cloth, paper-spine labels, edges untrimmed. From the library of British Arabist and colonial agent Col. S. B. Miles (1838–1914), with printed bookplates noting his widow's bequest of the collection to Bath Public Library in 1920, manuscript shelf-marks to spines and front-pastedowns, and blind-stamps to the text as usual. Spine-labels largely missing, vol. 1 spine chipped at foot, vols. 2 and 3 slightly nicked, skilful restoration to joints, sides lightly rubbed, tips bumped, endpapers browned, occasional light spotting, vol. 2 sigs. 21–2 foxed more heavily, occasional pale-tide marks to margins of vols. 2 and 3, only touching the text in vol. 3 contents. A good copy. First complete edition in English of this "important [Persian] text of the Azar Kayvani pseudo-Zorostrian sect. It was written anonymously between the years 1645 and 1658 and contains important information particularly about the prevalent religions of India in the 17th century" (Encyclopaedia Iranica). The author, erroneously identified by Sir William Jones as one Muhsin Fani, appears to to have composed most of the text during the reign of Shah Jahan, travelling to various parts of India to study different religious creeds; his attempt to keep his identity secret probably reflects the orthodox religious climate subsequently promulgated by Awrangzeb (r. 1658–1707). Each chapter is devoted to the beliefs of a different group, including Parsis, Hindus, Tibetans, Jews, Christians, Muslims, and (treated separately) Sufis, as well as smaller communities. The Persian text was printed in Calcutta in 1809; a partial translation by Francis Gladwin had previously appeared in the New Asiatic Miscellany (1789). This edition is scarce, with seven copies listed at auction since 1933. [Attributes: First Edition]

      [Bookseller: Peter Harrington. ABA member]
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        Arithmetik und Algebra. Mit besonderer Rücksicht auf die Bedürfnisse des practischen Lebens und der technischen Wissenschaften. Nebst e. Anhange v. 450 Aufgaben.

      gr.8. (4),VII,292 S. Hln. d.Zt. mit Marmorpapierbezug, Rückentitel u. Blinddr., etw. berieben u. bestoßen, Deckelbezüge a.d. Ecken beschabt, Rücken mit winz., sorgf. gekl. Einr., Besitzerstempel, durchgeh. unterschiedlich stockfl., ganz vereinzelt einige Anstreich. u. Anmerk., insges. trotz kl. Mängel gutes Expl. - Lehr- und Handbuch der Elementar-Mathematik 1.Bd. Erstausgabe. MNE I,189 Doppler-Bibliogr. 15 (falsch 1843) ÖBL I,196. Außerordentlich seltenes, kaum bekanntes Lehrbuch des bedeutenden Mathematikers u. Physikers.

      [Bookseller: Antiquariat Krikl]
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        Autograph letter signed ("G. Verdi") dated Roma, 24 Ott. 1844 [October 24, 1844], most likely to his French publisher Marie Pierre Yves Escudier regarding the composer's opera I Lombardi

      Apparently unpublished and unrecorded. I Lombardi alla prima crociata [The Lombards on the First Crusade], a dramma lirico in 4 acts to a libretto by Temistocle Solera after Tommaso Grossi's poem of the same name, was first performed in Milan at the Teatro alla Scala on February 11, 1843; the part of Pagano was sung by the bass Prospero Dérivis. The vocal score was published by Ricordi in Milan in 1843. The opera was revised as Jérusalem to a libretto by Alphonse Royer and Gustave Vaëz and first performed in the revised version in Paris at the Opéra on November 26, 1847. "I Lombardi has often been compared to Nabucco, the immensely successful opera that preceded it in the Verdi canon. It is easy to see how such comparisons usually find the later opera less satisfactory. I Lombardi has a wider-ranging action than Nabucco, but Verdi, at this stage of his career, was less able or willing to depict various sharply contrasting locales, and many of the opera's choral sections (which traditionally carried the weight of such depictions) are pallid and routine. The great exception is the chorus 'O Signore, dal tetto natio', which rightly stands beside 'Va pensiero' as representative of Verdi's new voice in Italian opera. The opera's musical characterization is strangely uneven: the presence of two leading tenors seems to divide attention where it might usefully have been focussed, but the leading soprano, Giselda, stamps her personality on the drama at a very early stage and succeeds in emerging with impressive effect." "Although Jérusalem was soon converted into the Italian Gerusalemme, and published in Italy, Verdi's revision failed to oust I Lombardi from the Italian stage and gradually disappeared from the repertory. This is in some ways regrettable, as the opera simplifies somewhat the complex action of the Italian original, adds convincing new music (in particular the fine crowd scene of Act 3 scene ii), cuts some of the weaker portions and, by converting Arvino from a tenor to a baritone, solves one of the problems of vocal distribution that occurred in I Lombardi. Whatever its ultimate merits, Jérusalem serves as a fascinating first document in charting Verdi's relationship with the French stage, a relationship that was to become increasingly important during the next decade." Roger Parker in Grove Music Online. The French brothers Marie (1809-1880) and Léon (1815-1881) Escudier were Verdi's publisher's in France; they also translated the libretti of two of Verdi's works into French: Le proscrit, or Le corsaire de Venise in 1845 (from Ernani), and Les deux Foscari in 1846. Marie Escudier first met Verdi in Milan in 1845, the same year Verdi ceded rights for publication of his works in France to the Escudiers (October), and Marie's first letter to Verdi has been commonly said to predate June 30, 1845. Providing that our assumption that the present letter is, indeed, to Marie Escudier, we now know that Verdi's first letter to Marie dates back to October of 1844. Marie Escudier was Verdi's correspondent through 1847; his brother Léon took over in either the summer or autumn of that year, informing Verdi about events in France and acting as intermediary between Verdi and impresarios, theater directors, singers, and librettists in France. Their relationship terminated in 1877 due to disagreements regarding the staging of the first performance of Aida in Paris, at the Théâtre Italien. The two operas that Verdi refers to in the present letter as writing for Naples and Venice were Alzira (first performed in Naples at the Teatro di San Carlo on August 12, 1845) and Attila (first performed in Venice at the Teatro La Fenice on March 17, 1846). The "Sigr. Vatel" referred to in the letter is August-Eugene Vatel, director of the Théâtre Italian in Paris at the time. Verdi went to Paris and attended the Opéra for the first time on June 1, 1847; Jérusalem premiered there on November 26th; "Sigr. Torre" can be identified as Giuseppe Torre, a poet and author of the text of many romanzas. I Lombardi was the first of Verdi's operas to be staged in the United States; it premiered at Palmo's Opera House in New York City on March 3, 1847. Palmo's, located on Chambers Street between Broadway and Centre Street, was one of the earliest opera houses in New York City. We would like to thank Dr. Daniela Macchione for her kind assistance in our preparation of this description.. 2 pp. Octavo. With decorative embossed blindstamp ("BATH") to upper inner left corner. An important letter regarding I Lombardi, including commentary regarding orchestration for the character of Pagano, the necessity for a large orchestra and choir, staging, the composer's plans to write operas for Naples and Venice, future performances of his works, etc. Verdi states that he has written to his publisher Ricordi about the part for Pagano "arranged for baritone with the orchestra properly adjusted." He describes the opera as his "most difficult" and states that, "in addition to the three principal artists, it also needs a ensemble of orchestra and choruses" in order that the work be properly staged. The composer goes on to say that he will write for Naples and Venice next year, and that he "will be free in two years from now, that is to say from October 1845 to March 1847" if Mr. Vatel would like to discuss the possibility of making a "deal," but Verdi would like one of his operas to be performed before then. He then states that a "Mr. Torre of Genoa" has given him a Romanza that he will set to music as soon as he has "a spare moment." In closing, Verdi thanks Escudier for his "kind words and for the care [he] takes of giving notoriety" to the composer's "poor name." Browned, especially at upper edge; small old tapemark; creased at folds and somewhat overall; small pinholes. Archivally repaired and restored.

      [Bookseller: J & J Lubrano Music Antiquarians LLC]
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        A RaManuscript Journal - Beginnings of Holt Shipping Empire

      North Lincolnshire, England, Belgium, 1843-1856 - Original manuscript shipping ledger journal kept by merchant and sloop shipmaster John Holt of Garthorpe, conceivably being the uncle (born 1822) and namesake of the famous John Holt (1841-1917) who subsequently founded the pioneering Liverpool-West Africa shipping company still operating today as John Holt plc. Features at least six John Holt signature incsriptions. 8vo. 194 pages in manuscript. Original vellum binding with working brass clasp and orange marbled endpapers. Age-toning to boards, early repair to clasp, otherwise in very good condition, a noteworthy primary source document with much detail. While much is known about renowned merchant and shipping magnate John Holt (1841-1917) and his brothers with whom he partnered in the West Africa trade, very little detail is readily available on the shipping activities of his predecessors and mentors. [Of the freight transport and trade activities prior to the founding of John Holt & Co. (Liverpool) Ltd in 1884, the only known archive of Holt family papers is held by the National Archives, which spans from 1703 to 1965.] The present volume comprises a firsthand record of the commercial shipping activities in and outside of England made by a John Holt of Garthorpe six years before the famous John Holt of Garthorpe's voyage to Fernando Po, and thirty years prior to the founding of John Holt and Company which established trading posts and banking in West Africa. The writer may quite rightly be the uncle and namesake of the great businessman and company founder. As he plied the English coast and continent, then explored foreign trade, John Holt of Garthorpe, keeper of the present journal, dutifully penned a ledger of expenses and accounts. The volume beginning in 1843 and pertaining largely to freight transport on the rivers of North Lincolnshire. His entries, however, further reveal the start of coastal trade from the northeast to the south coast of England, and, in the latter years, we notice substantial increase in the number of port towns visited for trade. His pioneering voyages to continental Europe in 1853 show the Holt family's subsequent beginnings in foreign trade, and foretell the imminent success which would build favourable and profitable Anglo-African trade relations for centuries to follow. Tirelessly ferrying all kinds of cargo throughout North Lincolnshire and centering around the Isle of Axholme for several years, he frequently transported gravel, cobble and binding agents, which is consistent with the ongoing construction of navigable canals, as well as railways, in this period. The Barton-on-Humber railway station, for example, was opened as part of the branch line from New Holland to Barton-on-Humber in 1849. Ale was also frequently transported. Deliveries of cargo were made to the following locations in North Lincolnshire: the ancient Parish called Belton (near Epworth), Crowle, Luddington (now Luddington and Haldenby), West Butterwick, Spalding on the River Welland in the South Holland district, Gunhouse [Gunness], Burringham on the east bank of the river Trent, Grimsby, Boothferry and Goole, and the Parish of Althorpe - one of the eight original parishes in the Isle of Axholme (now Keadby with Althorpe). Hull, in the East Riding of Yorkshire, is a principle port, and from here he frequently ships potatoes and other goods as far as London. Barton is also mentioned [Barton-upon-Humbler across the river from Hull]. Some clients are named. On 19 August 1848 he delivered 70 tons of 'cliff' for Baronet Sir Robert Sheffield, whom in 1842 had purchased the old Healey estate in Frodingham, together with a Charles Winn. [This was either Sir Robert Sheffield, 4th Baronet (1796-1862), Major of the North Lincolnshire Yeomanry, Justice of the Peace, High Sherriff of Lincolnshire, and politician, or possibly his eldest son Sir Robert Sheffield, 5th Baronet (1823-1886) who also served as High Sherriff of Lincolnshire.] In the 1850's Holt's inland business was expanding g

      [Bookseller: Voyager Press Rare Books & Manuscripts]
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        The rambles of the Emperor Ching Tih in Keang Nan.: Translated by Tkin Shen, Student of the Anglo-Chinese College, Malacca. With a Preface by James Legge, President of the College.

      London Longman, Brown, Green, & Longmans 1843 - A translation of Hsiu-hsiang Cheng-te huang yu Chiang-nan, an account of the travels of the Ming Emperor Cheng-te in the Kiangnan region. Cordier BS 1776; Lust 1105; Morrison I p. 731 A very good set bound in modern half calf. First edition of this translation Two volumes, pp.[viii], 320; [iv], 322, 6 (advertisements).

      [Bookseller: John Randall (Books of Asia), ABA, ILAB]
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        CONSTANTINOPLE, Collection de dessins

      1843 - [CONSTANTINOPLE]. Collection de dessins. Un volume in-folio ; plein veau havane, plats et dos décorés. Réunion de 200 dessins sur Constantinople et ses environs, certains aquarellés, la plupart datés 1843-1844, collés sur 84 feuillets, et réunis dans une élégante reliure signée Gustav Hedeberg. De nombreux dessins portent une légende en français ou en italien, et sont numérotés. Certains comportent des annotations pour la couleur. Les sujets sont variés : ils représentent des vues, des monuments (architecture), des personnages en costumes turcs, des animaux, des scènes de la vie quotidienne Huit dessins sont dépliants, dont un grand panorama de Zante en 4 feuilles jointes in fine. Les dessins sont signés d’un monogramme. [Attributes: First Edition; Hard Cover]

      [Bookseller: LIBRAIRIE MONSIEUR LE PRINCE]
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        A Journal Of The Disasters In Affghanistan, 1841–2. [together with a three-page letter from Lady Sale, and a contemporary copy of Dr Brydon's famous account of his experiences on the retreat from Kabul]

      London: John Murray, 1843 - Octavo (187 × 114 mm). Contemporary reddish pink full diced calf, green morocco label, low, flat bands, compartments with gilt triple fillet panel enclosing lozenge centre-tool with spiral arabesque corner-pieces, triple fillet panels gilt to boards, sun in splendour gilt edge-roll, marbled edges and endpapers. Bookseller's label of E. Blackwell of London Street, Reading to front pastedown. Attractive armorial bookplate of James Bonnell on front pastedown; gift inscription from his relative Mary Anne Harvey Bonnell, who later conveyed the Bonnell estates at Purleigh to him by deed of gift. Very light shelfwear, some foxing front and back, light toning otherwise, an excellent copy. Folding frontispiece plan of Kabul, and one other map. First edition. Lady Sale's diary account of the siege, fall, and retreat from Kabul was a great popular success, the author becoming "the heroine of the hour, renowned for her courage" (ODNB). She "graphically describes General Elphinstone's weak and vacillating leadership in the face of the insurgent Afghan chiefs and his army's subsequent retreat Sale's entries make clear the sense of confusion, poor discipline, non-existent organisation, and lack of planning which contributed to the terrible bloodshed of the retreat" (Riddick). This copy is in a very pretty contemporary binding, and is greatly enhanced by the inclusion of a three-page letter from Lady Sale, together with a contemporary copy of Dr William Brydon's account of his experiences as the whole survivor of the retreat. The letter, dated 18 August 1844, on a single bifolium of small octavo mourning stationery is addressed to Mrs Spink, wife of Colonel Spink, Assistant Quartermaster-General at Cork and a colleague who had seen service with Sale in the 12th Foot – the original envelope addressed in Sales's hand mounted beneath the signature. It gives a sense of the reception that the Sales received in England: "I feel it quite delightful being able to sit down quietly in the country for the racketing of a London life is dreadfully fatiguing to an old woman. I feel greatly flattered by & very grateful for all the kindness and attention shown to us. Sale dined with the Court of Directors on Wednesday & the ladies went to the gallery to hear the speeches, it was most exciting. Sale was so affected by it that when he rose to speak, utterance was almost denied him. I was completely taken aback at my health being drunk & the universal cheering that accompanied it This evening we were asked to the Russian Ambassadors but sent an excuse as being in the country. Tomorrow we dine at the Duke of Wellington's to meet the Prince of Prussia. On Monday Sale dines with the Junior United Service Club. So you see being in the country is nothing very quiet. I fear you will think us very ungrateful for all the attention shewn us here when I say how happy I am in the prospect of returning to India in December, but which constitutes Home". The book is also accompanied by a six-page contemporary transcription of Brydon's famous letter to his brother recounting his experiences as the sole survivor of the retreat from Kabul: "Here I am at this place, all safe but not all sound, having received three wounds in the head, left hand & knee. I have lost everything I had in the world; but my life has been saved in a most wonderful manner, and I am the only European who has escaped from the Cabool Army of 13000". The transcription is on three sheets of paper watermarked Renshaw & Kirkman, 1840, and with the blind stamp of the Devizes stationers Henry Bull, folded to form three bifolia. Bruce 4489; Riddick 163. [Attributes: First Edition; Signed Copy]

      [Bookseller: Peter Harrington. ABA member]
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        THAMES TUNNEL PEEPSHOW

      1843. Hardback. Good. Good condition with no wrapper. 1200 feet long, 76 feet below high water mark, was 8 years building and cost £446,000, opened the 25th day of March 1843. Bound accordion style, 4 hand--coloured scenes (includes front cover which has 2 holes cut out - peepholes). Contained in a slipcase with onlay to front (same as front cover of book). Rear cover is creased and colour (black) has been touched up to rear cover and edges of front cover. I think that the slipcase has been repaired/reinforced. [R]

      [Bookseller: Stella & Rose's Books]
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        The natural history of man...

      London: H. Bailliere, 1843. FIRST EDITION. Hand-coloured engraved frontispiece, 40 engraved plates on 39 leaves (36 hand-coloured) and numerous text woodcuts. Modern calf, gilt border on covers, spine in compartments with gilt decorations, title and author in gilt; new endpapers. Overall an excellent copy. First edition of this finely illustrated ethnographical study of mankind. The present work was of major importance for its assemblage of organized data on human population. Prichard sets forth the differences of color, hair, stature and form. He examines the value of each criterion as evidence of differences in race, and maintains that all mankind is descended from one family. Prichard (1786-1848) was a physician and anthropologist as well as a pioneer in the moral treatment of the insane. He laid the groundwork for the later research by Lyell and anticipated the human evolution theories of Darwin and Weismann.

      [Bookseller: B & L Rootenberg Rare Books & Manuscript]
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        A RaManuscript Journal - Beginnings of Holt Shipping Empire

      North Lincolnshire, England, Belgium, 1843-1856, 1843. Original manuscript shipping ledger journal kept by merchant and sloop shipmaster John Holt of Garthorpe, conceivably being the uncle (born 1822) and namesake of the famous John Holt (1841-1917) who subsequently founded the pioneering Liverpool-West Africa shipping company still operating today as John Holt plc. Features at least six John Holt signature incsriptions. 8vo. 194 pages in manuscript. Original vellum binding with working brass clasp and orange marbled endpapers. Age-toning to boards, early repair to clasp, otherwise in very good condition, a noteworthy primary source document with much detail. While much is known about renowned merchant and shipping magnate John Holt (1841-1917) and his brothers with whom he partnered in the West Africa trade, very little detail is readily available on the shipping activities of his predecessors and mentors. [Of the freight transport and trade activities prior to the founding of John Holt & Co. (Liverpool) Ltd in 1884, the only known archive of Holt family papers is held by the National Archives, which spans from 1703 to 1965.] The present volume comprises a firsthand record of the commercial shipping activities in and outside of England made by a John Holt of Garthorpe six years before the famous John Holt of Garthorpe's voyage to Fernando Po, and thirty years prior to the founding of John Holt and Company which established trading posts and banking in West Africa. The writer may quite rightly be the uncle and namesake of the great businessman and company founder. As he plied the English coast and continent, then explored foreign trade, John Holt of Garthorpe, keeper of the present journal, dutifully penned a ledger of expenses and accounts. The volume beginning in 1843 and pertaining largely to freight transport on the rivers of North Lincolnshire. His entries, however, further reveal the start of coastal trade from the northeast to the south coast of England, and, in the latter years, we notice substantial increase in the number of port towns visited for trade. His pioneering voyages to continental Europe in 1853 show the Holt family's subsequent beginnings in foreign trade, and foretell the imminent success which would build favourable and profitable Anglo-African trade relations for centuries to follow. Tirelessly ferrying all kinds of cargo throughout North Lincolnshire and centering around the Isle of Axholme for several years, he frequently transported gravel, cobble and binding agents, which is consistent with the ongoing construction of navigable canals, as well as railways, in this period. The Barton-on-Humber railway station, for example, was opened as part of the branch line from New Holland to Barton-on-Humber in 1849. Ale was also frequently transported. Deliveries of cargo were made to the following locations in North Lincolnshire: the ancient Parish called Belton (near Epworth), Crowle, Luddington (now Luddington and Haldenby), West Butterwick, Spalding on the River Welland in the South Holland district, Gunhouse [Gunness], Burringham on the east bank of the river Trent, Grimsby, Boothferry and Goole, and the Parish of Althorpe - one of the eight original parishes in the Isle of Axholme (now Keadby with Althorpe). Hull, in the East Riding of Yorkshire, is a principle port, and from here he frequently ships potatoes and other goods as far as London. Barton is also mentioned [Barton-upon-Humbler across the river from Hull]. Some clients are named. On 19 August 1848 he delivered 70 tons of 'cliff' for Baronet Sir Robert Sheffield, whom in 1842 had purchased the old Healey estate in Frodingham, together with a Charles Winn. [This was either Sir Robert Sheffield, 4th Baronet (1796-1862), Major of the North Lincolnshire Yeomanry, Justice of the Peace, High Sherriff of Lincolnshire, and politician, or possibly his eldest son Sir Robert Sheffield, 5th Baronet (1823-1886) who also served as High Sherriff of Lincolnshire.] In the 1850's Holt's inland business was expanding greatly, with new clients at Gainsborough, Dunkirk, Ispwich, Wisbech, Rochester, Newcastle, and Lowestoft. Large quantities of tiles were sent to London during this period, 36,000 tiles, 45,000 tiles, as well as fire clay and fire bricks. On 10 February 1855 the usual cargo of potatoes was brought to London, and this time two bells as well. Reflecting the prosperity refinement of the Victorian era, at Hull he delivered marble, mahogany, iron and barrels of resin. In 1851, a notable change occurred when Holt took his business to the sea coast. His first coastal voyage was for a substantial delivery being made on 12 July, consisting of stone, machinery, several carts and wagons, paint, and oil, quite possibly for the expansion of the Southampton West End railway station which was constructed in 1847, and its terminus at Blechynden Terrace which came into use in 1850. [Developments continued until 1860, by which time the station was equipped with a booking office and two waiting rooms on the up and down platforms. The Southampton and Dorchester Railway Company, having amalgamated with the large London and South Western Railway (LSWR) in 1848, was expanding and improving its lines at this time.] Fees incurred on this voyage included dues payable at Dover and Ramsgate, boomage and quay dues, over and above the regular expenses. In 1853 Holt was making voyages along the northern sea coast of England, with a delivery of timber to the famous shipbuilding town of Whitby, where Captain Cook learned seamanship. In the same year he shipped 108 tons of coal to Harwich, 86 tons of shingles to Hull. Sunderland also became a relatively frequent port. Finally, crossing the North Sea in 1853 for the first time with commercial cargo, the sloop called "Gutteridge" transported 104 tons of guano to Antwerp in Belgium; a cargo of machinery is subsequently brought to Brussels; these being the first steps in foreign shipping for John Holt of Garthorpe. Fees and expenses tallied throughout the volume include wharfage, bridge dues, tariffs paid to the Lord Mayor of London, separate canal dues in London, Humber dues, pilotage. In April 1846 he pays dues paid on 15 horses and some ale, evidently trying his hand at transporting live animals. In Hull, January 1847, a delivery of cement stone and hoops requires payment of dock dues, buoyage, corporation fee, entrance fee, and house commissions. Dues are occasionally paid at Spurn [The lifeboat station at Spurn Head was built in 1810, on the north bank of the mouth of the Humber estuary. Owing to the remote location, houses for the lifeboat crew and their families were added a few years later]. In addition, he pays a boatswain, a waterman, and other hired labour from time to time. During this thirteen years of trade, Holt had at least 3 sloops, "Friends" from 1843-1849, "Acorn" from 1849-1851, and "Gutteridge" from 1851-1856. These were all made by shipbuilder John Wray (1796-1884) of Burton Stather. By 1851 he employed sixteen men. An interesting connection may be realized through this volume. The keeper of this ledger, John Holt, inscribes a note to remember his wedding to 'Sarah' on 16 October 1845. The 1851 census states that John Wray had a niece named Sarah. In 1851, a notable change occurred when Holt took his business to the sea coast. Making the connection between merchant and sloop shipmaster John Holt of Garthorpe who wrote the present ledger, and the famous John Holt of Garthorpe (1841-1917) who subsequently founded the Liverpool-West Africa shipping company: From the Holt family of Garthorpe there were many in the shipping trade, from shipwrights and sailmasters, to shipowners, and leading merchants, the most famous of them being the brothers who established a shipping trade in West Africa. With ancestral origins in Broughton Grange, they established firms in Liverpool, including John Holt & Co Ltd, West Africa Traders & Shipowners. Needing no introduction, John Holt (1841-1915) was an English merchant who founded the most significant shipping line which operated between Liverpool and West Africa, and a number of businesses in Nigeria, which are now incorporated in John Holt plc. Born on the 31 October 1841 in Garthorpe, Lincolnshire, he first worked for his grandfather, learning the sea trade at an exceptionally young age. Subsequently, at the age of fifteen, he became the apprentice of William Laird, a Liverpool coal dealer. Just prior to completing his apprenticeship, in 1862 he went to Fernando Po to take up an appointment as secretary to James Lynslager, formerly acting British Consul who was pursuing his personal commercial interests. [Sir Richard Burton had just entered the Foreign Service as consul of the island.] There he managed Lynslager's trading post. Five years later, he bought out his employer, and he was joined by his brother Jonathan. In 1868 Johnathan bought a schooner, which enabled the brothers to open more trading posts in West Africa. In 1874 the brothers opened an office in Liverpool. In 1881, John entered the palm oil trade. In 1884 the brothers formed a partnership, John Holt and Company. Falling in line with family tradition, his father, Thomas Godfrey Holt (born 1817 Luddington, Lincolnshire - died 1909 Appleby, Lincolnshire), was a shipowner and merchant as well. It was he, who arranged for his son, the famous John Holt of Garthope, to apprenticeship under Laird for five years. The original indenture document between William Laird and Thomas Godfrey Holt is held in the Liverpool Maritime Museum Archives. [The 1856 gazetteer and directory of Lincolnshire lists both Thomas Holt (father) and John Holt (son) as master mariners at Garthorpe on the Isle of Axholme. Thomas is also described as a coal merchant, vessel owner and victualler, of "Sheffield Arms", Ferry, having purchased the "Sheffield Arms Inn" at Burton upon Stather.] Especially interesting in reference to the present volume, his paternal uncle and namesake was John Holt, born 1822 in Burton-upon-Stather, quite likely the author of the present volume, and surely another source of inspiration for setting out to Africa in the first place, to learn about foreign commerce. His grandfather, Thomas Holt (born 1788 All Saints, Flixborough - married Elizabeth Godfrey in Luddington church on 28 June 1814 - died 1863 Luddington), was a sea merchant of notable repute. He is listed in census as a sailor in 1815 and a ship master by 1817, at these times his surname was spelled Hoult. He is mentioned in the coastal trade archives, and found in several articles of the Hull Packet Newspaper. He received a master's certificate for having worked 43 years in coastal trade. The record states: "Thomas Holt, Born at Crosby, Lincolnshire, 12 September 1788, has been employed in the capacities of App & Master 43 years in the British Merchant Service in the Coasting Trade." He travelled as far as Constantinople and Saint Petersburg. There is a burial recorded at Luddington on 20th February 1863, for a Thomas Holt, of Garthorpe, aged 74. Historical records confirm that Thomas & Elizabeth Holt had between them at least six children, 4 boys and 2 girls between 1815 & 1827, as follows: - William, born 1815 - Thomas Godfrey, born 1817 (father of famed business founder John Holt of Garthorpe) - Elizabeth, born 1820 in Luddington, baptised in Burton upon Stather on 17 September 1820 where the family resided - John, born on 20 July 1822, baptised in Burton upon Stather, the family living in "The Stather", close to the shore of the River Trent, his father Thomas being recorded as being a waterman - William Leonard, born 1825, baptised at Burton upon Stather, 7 February 1825, the family living in "The Stather", his father Thomas recorded as being a mariner - Mary Ann, born 1827, baptised at Luddington 27 December 1827, the family are once again in Garthorpe, and Thomas described as a master mariner. The family made frequent moves between Burton upon Stather, Luddington, and Garthorpe. The village of Garthorpe in North Lincolnshire, in the Isle of Axholme, is situated approximately 8 miles (13 km) south-east from Goole, and 1 mile (1.6 km) west from the River Trent, is the home of John Holt, writer of the present ledger, and also John Holt founder of the renowned West Africa shipping company. It is contiguous with the village of Fockerby. [Garthorpe of North Lincolnshire should not be confused with the village by the same name, and civil parish (called Garthorpe and Fockerby) in the Melton district of Leicestershire.] In 1833 "Bartholomew's Gazetteer of Britain" describes the Isle of Axholme as follows: "Area of slight elevation above flat and formerly marshy tract bounded by the Rivers Trent, Torne and Idle. Towns include Crowle, Belton, Epworth and Haxey on higher ground and Owston Ferry and West Butterwick beside the River Trent.".

      [Bookseller: Voyager Press Rare Books & Manuscripts, ]
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        The Conqueror Worm in Graham's Magazine

      Graham 1843 - First appearance of Poe's The Conqueror Worm. Philadelphia: Graham, 1842. Large thick quarto half roan over marbled boards. Spine with raised bands and simple gilt borders to compartments. Contents clean and fresh. A very good copy. [Attributes: First Edition; Hard Cover]

      [Bookseller: Bookbid]
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        Das Nexum, Die Nexi und die Lex Petillia.

      1843 - The Roman Law of Parent and Child Bachofen, Johann Jakob [1815-1887]. Das Nexum, die Nexi und die Lex Petillia: Eine Rechtshistorische Abhandlung. Basel: Verlag von J.G. Neukirch, 1843. [ii], 160 pp. Octavo (8-1/2" x 5"). Original printed publisher wrappers, unopened signatures. Some rubbing to edges, light soiling and faint dampspotting, spine darkened. Moderate toning and occasional light foxing to text. * First edition. Bachofen, a founder of the German Historical School, is best-known as the author of Das Mutterrecht (1861), a ground-breaking history of the family as a social institution. An early example of his work in this field, Das Nexum deals with the Roman law of parent and child. OCLC locates no copies in North America. British Museum Catalogue (Compact Edition) 2:79. [Attributes: First Edition; Soft Cover]

      [Bookseller: The Lawbook Exchange, Ltd., ABAA ILAB]
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        Enten-Eller Et Livs-Fragment. udgivet af Victor Eremita (Either-Or, A Fragment of Life).

      C.A. Reitzel, Kjøbenhavn 1843 - Kierkegaard's Famous "Either-Or" Challenge to Life - PMM 314Volume 1: Half-title + TP + [V]-XX = Forord + [XXI] = Indhold + half-title + [3]-470 + 2 blank leaves; Volume 2: Half-title + TP + 1 leaf = Inhold + half-title + [1]-368 + 1 blank leaf, Octavo, First Edition (Himmelstrup 20).With the often missing half-titles present. This is one of only 525 copies printed of this work."Kierkegaard's third published book and the first of many pseudonymous 'aesthetic' works. Generally regarded as the first major statement of his own unsystematic philosophy, this 'fragment' is a literary and philosophical tour de force incorporating a stunning array of subject matter, literary effects, and moods, including melancholy aphorisms and personal meditation, elaborate musical, dramatic and literary criticism, lyrical effusions, odd essays on unhappiness and boredom, a strange 'Seducer's Diary' and, in the second volume, an extended treatise on marriage, the human personality and the ethical life in the form of a letter from a Judge to a younger man, capped by a sermon sounding a note of radical doubt about both the aesthetic and ethical justifications for existence." (Wronoski, p. 11)"Enten-Eller was written before he was twenty-nine. It is a curious bundle of papers, essays, semi-dialogues and notes, seemingly ill-assorted, but in fact dialectically arranged. Adopting what he called an 'aesthetic attitude' he held that this consisted in balancing possibilities, and that in matters religious and ethical it was up to the individual to make his choice. Choice, as the title of his work suggests, was at the root of Kierkegaard's theory. There can be no system of existence, only a system of ideas. From this he develops his thesis of 'Existence" (since taken up by the modern Existentialist), in which human beings considered as subjects not objects are the only real existence: their reflective as opposed to active nature being focused on the 'acts' of making perpetual decisions" (PMM, pp. 190-91) Printing and the Mind of Man 314. Contemporary embossed cloth with gilt decorations and lettering on the spines (which have been lightened by the sun). The half title volume one has the author's real name handwritten beneath the pseudonym (Victor Cremita) and someone has tried unsuccessfully to eradicate this - leaving the name and a small dark cloud around it. This failed attempt has bled over to the title page which shows a small cloudy stain in the corresponding location. (See photos.) The title page of volume 2 has a small, faded purple circular stamp (with no lettering) in the lower right corner. Other than these noted imperfections, this is a really lovely copy of this important work in Western Philosophy. ADDITIONAL PHOTOS AVAILABLE UPON REQUEST. [Attributes: First Edition]

      [Bookseller: Athena Rare Books ABAA]
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        Monographie du The. Description Botanique, Torrefaction, Composition Chimique, Proprietes Hygieniques de cette Feuille

      Paris: Published by the author, 1843. First edition. Hardcover. Very good condition. Finely illustrated monograph on tea and tea manufacturing. Contents include the history of tea cultivation, origin, chemical composition of tea, medical properties of tea, and preparation of tea. 8vo, (iv,) 160pp, 17 full page engraved plates. Blue cloth, gilt decoration & title on spine. Corners bumped, covers and spine ends a bit rubbed.

      [Bookseller: Antipodean Books, Maps & Prints]
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        Grätz. Ein naturhistorisch-statistisch-topographisches Gemählde dieser Stadt und ihrer Umgebungen.

      Graz, Verlag der F. Ferstl’schen Buchhandlung, 1843. 8°. Mit gefalt. Stahlstich-Frontispiz (Gesamtansicht von Graz), chromolithogr. farb. Titel, chromolithogr. farb. Widmungsblatt m. 5 kleinen Ansichten, 22 Stahlstich-Ansichten, einer mehrf. gefalt. kolor. „Topographisch-geognostische(n) Karte der Umgebungen von Grätz“ v. Fr. Unger u. einem mehrf. gefalt. „Plan der Provinzial-Hauptstadt Grätz und der nächsten Umgebung“ v. Bruno Kopal. XVI, 570, 32 S., HLdr. d. Zt. m. etw. Rückenverg. u. goldgepr. Rückentitel. Erstausgabe. - Bedeutende, unter Mitarbeit von A. v. Muchar, Fr. Unger u. Chr. Weiglein entstandene Beschreibung von Graz. - Die schönen, fein ausgeführten Stahlstiche nach Conrad Kreutzer (Thieme/B. XXI, 522) mit Ansichten wie \"Das Burgthor\", \"Die Kettenbrücke\", \"Der Hauptwachplatz\", \"Der Franzens Platz\", \"Das Rathhaus\", \"Der Jakomini-Platz\", \"St. Leonhard\", \"Geidorf\", \"Der Graben\", \"Maria Grün\", \"Maria Trost\", \"Strassengel\", \"Stift Rein\", \"Schloss Eggenberg\", \"Tobelbad\", \"Gleichenberg\" u.a. - Einband etw. berieben u. bestoßen. Karte u. Plan m. Einriß. Durchg. unterschiedlich gebräunt, stockfleckig u. wasserrandig. - Schlossar 157; Nebehay/W. III, 668; Wurzbach XXXI, 289. Versand D: 12,00 EUR Schreiner, Grätz. Ein naturhistorisch-statistisch-topographisches Gemählde dieser Stadt und ihrer Umgebungen, Graz

      [Bookseller: Antiquariat Wolfgang Friebes]
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        Epes Kittisch.Noch ä Beitraagk zu Israels Verkehr u. Geist. Vunn kaa`m vunn unsere Leut`. Vumm Verf. vunn: `Ae Kalle unn aach kaan Kalle` ...

       Speyer, Lang 1843. kl.-8°. 174 (2) S. HLn. d. Zt. Mit mont. vord. OU. Stellenw. stockfl. EAChristian Heinrich Gilardone (1798-1874), Neffe des Malers Friedrich Müller, war ein deutscher Dichter aus der Pfalz, der neben dem Hochdeutschen auch in jiddisch-lotegorisch, der Eigensprache der pfälzischen Juden bzw. Händler schrieb und reimte. Der Pfälzer Dichter gehört zu den ganz wenigen, die in Westeuropa auch der jiddischen Literatur zugerechnet werden. Heute kann man diese Sprache nur noch bruchstückhaft verstehen, damals sprach Gilardone jedoch in der Pfalz einen großen Leserkreis damit an und selbst vielen Nicht-Juden war der Dialekt zumindest verständlich. Versand D: 4,00 EUR Judaica, Literatur, Sprachwissenschaft

      [Bookseller: Antiquariat Burgverlag]
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        DISSERTATIO CHEMICA INAUGURALIS DE BALAENA,

      - QUAM FAVENTE SUMMO NUMINE, EX AUCTORITATE RECTORIS MAGNIFICI CORNNELII ADRIANI BERGSMA [?] PRO GRADU DOCTORATUS, SUMMISQUE IN MATHESI ET PHILOSOPHIA NATURALI HONORIBUS ET PRIVILEGIIS, IN ACADEMIA RHENO-TRAJECTINA RITE AC LEGITIME CONSEQUENDIS. ERUDITORUM EXAMINI SUBMITTIT PETRUS JOANNES VAN KERCKHOFF Roterodamensis, AD DIEM XXV NOVEMBRIS, MDCCCXLIII [1843], HORA II. ROTERODAMI. EX TYPOGRAPHEO MENSING & VAN WESTREENEN. [1843]. In 4º (de 21x14 cm) com [8], 83, 4 págs. Encadernação artística da época inteira de marroquim vermelho com ferros a ouro nas esquadrias das pastas. Corte das folhas dourado. Impresso em latim sobre papel encorpado. Ilustrado com quadros de dados das experiências efectuadas. Petrus Johannes van Kerckhoff (1813-1876), químico holandês, futuro professor emérito reconhecido pelas Universidades de Utrecht e de Groningen, apresenta aqui a sua tese em bioquímica. Obra muito rara escrita em latim, tal como era uso nas provas académicas da época, da qual existem só mais 7 exemplares referenciados. Trata-se da investigação da estrutura química dos fios das barbas de baleia. O autor, através de várias decomposições químicas (em álcool, éter, ácido acético, ácido sulfúrico, etc.) e com a análise dos resultados efectuada num microscópio (com potência de 233 x), consegue verificar, através da luminescência, a existência de ácidos nucleicos próprios da baleia, por comparação com a estrutura de outras matérias vegetais. Trata-se de um passo científico para o conhecimento do ADN no início do século XX. In 4º (21x14 cm) with [8], 83, 4 pp. Binding: Contemporary artistic full red morocco. Gilt tools on the boards? frames. Gilt edges. Printed in Latin on thick paper. Illustrated with tables with the data of the performed experiences. Petrus Johannes van Kerckhoff (1813-1876), Dutch chemist, later professor emeritus recognised by the Utrecht and Groningen Universities, presents here his thesis in biochemistry. A very rare work, written in Latin, as it was usual in the academic examinations at the time. There are only 7 copies referenced of this work. The theme is the investigation of the chemical structure of the baleen hair strands. The author, through several chemical decompositions (in alcohol, ether, acetic acid, sulphuric acid, etc.) and analysing the results under the microscope (with a 233x zoom), manages to verify, by means of luminescence, the existence of nucleic acids proper to the whale, by comparison with the structure of other vegetal matters. This is a scientific step towards the knowledge of DNA at the beginning of the 20th century. Location/localizacao: Sala 5/salao Paris

      [Bookseller: Livraria Castro e Silva]
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        Windsor Castle: An Historical Romance

      Henry Colburn, London 1843 - Half-title present in Volume Three only. Moderate rubbing to papered boards, with some loss of paper at edges and corners. Moderate foxing to frontispiece in Volumes One and Two. Heavy foxing to frontispiece in Volume Three. ; Three volumes. First edition in book form. Volume One: [2], iii, [1], 296 pages + frontis. Volume Two: [2], iii, [1], 300 pages + frontis. Volume Three: vii, [1], 324 pages + frontis. Contemporary quarter cloth and papered boards with printed paper labels. Page dimensions: 199 x 123mm. ; 8vo [Attributes: Hard Cover]

      [Bookseller: Renaissance Books]
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        Karte über die Güter des Peter Stommel. Roland, Kreuzbrüder oder Tönnisaap, Guiters oder Hohen, Aap, Fliethen, Lommenhaus, Trotz, Tiefenberg, Jüngeshof in der Bürgermeisterei Ratingen und Gerresheim bei Düsseldorf. 1843.':.

      - kolorierte Lithographie b. Wolf'sche Buchdruckerei Hermann Boß in Düsseldorf, 1845, 46 x 50,5 Karte der Umgebung zwischen Gerresheim, Morsenbroich und Ratingen. - Oben links Haus Roland im Jahre 1843 aus halber Vogelschau. - Oben rechts Titel. - Detailliertes Blatt der genannten Umgebung.

      [Bookseller: Antiquariat Norbert Haas]
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        Lucerne from the Cathedral Bridge. Getönte Lithographie. aus: Switzerland. Secenes and incidents of travel in the Bernese Oberland ...

      London, Th. McLean, 1843. Blattmaß 36 x 50 cm, Darstellung23 x 39 cm. Luzern: Blickvon der ehemaligen Hofbrücke oder auch Langen Brücke. - Unter Passpartout. Versand D: 2,30 EUR

      [Bookseller: Antiquariat Galerie Joy]
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        Incidents of Travel in Yucatan (Complete Set of 2 Volumes)

      New York: Harper & Brothers, 1843. First American Edition. Hardcover. Very Good. Publisher's gilt-stamped cloth; complete set of 2 volumes, 8vo. With b/w plates. BOTH VOLUMES: Spine sunned, and lightly chipped at tips; corners lightly bumped. Remnants of tape repairs on joints of Volume 1. Previous owner's bookplate and signature, plus a little age-toning, on endpapers; folding plate in Volume 1 a little wrinkled along the fore-edge; otherwise internally bright and clean.

      [Bookseller: Sanctuary Books]
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        Autograph letter signed ("G. Verdi") dated Roma, 24 Ott. 1844 [October 24, 1844], most likely to his French publisher Marie Pierre Yves Escudier regarding the composer's opera I Lombardi

      Apparently unpublished and unrecorded. I Lombardi alla prima crociata [The Lombards on the First Crusade], a dramma lirico in 4 acts to a libretto by Temistocle Solera after Tommaso Grossi's poem of the same name, was first performed in Milan at the Teatro alla Scala on February 11, 1843; the part of Pagano was sung by the bass Prospero Dérivis. The vocal score was published by Ricordi in Milan in 1843. The opera was revised as Jérusalem to a libretto by Alphonse Royer and Gustave Vaëz and first performed in the revised version in Paris at the Opéra on November 26, 1847. "I Lombardi has often been compared to Nabucco, the immensely successful opera that preceded it in the Verdi canon. It is easy to see how such comparisons usually find the later opera less satisfactory. I Lombardi has a wider-ranging action than Nabucco, but Verdi, at this stage of his career, was less able or willing to depict various sharply contrasting locales, and many of the opera's choral sections (which traditionally carried the weight of such depictions) are pallid and routine. The great exception is the chorus 'O Signore, dal tetto natio', which rightly stands beside 'Va pensiero' as representative of Verdi's new voice in Italian opera. The opera's musical characterization is strangely uneven: the presence of two leading tenors seems to divide attention where it might usefully have been focussed, but the leading soprano, Giselda, stamps her personality on the drama at a very early stage and succeeds in emerging with impressive effect." "Although Jérusalem was soon converted into the Italian Gerusalemme, and published in Italy, Verdi's revision failed to oust I Lombardi from the Italian stage and gradually disappeared from the repertory. This is in some ways regrettable, as the opera simplifies somewhat the complex action of the Italian original, adds convincing new music (in particular the fine crowd scene of Act 3 scene ii), cuts some of the weaker portions and, by converting Arvino from a tenor to a baritone, solves one of the problems of vocal distribution that occurred in I Lombardi. Whatever its ultimate merits, Jérusalem serves as a fascinating first document in charting Verdi's relationship with the French stage, a relationship that was to become increasingly important during the next decade." Roger Parker in Grove Music Online. The French brothers Marie (1809-1880) and Léon (1815-1881) Escudier were Verdi's publisher's in France; they also translated the libretti of two of Verdi's works into French: Le proscrit, or Le corsaire de Venise in 1845 (from Ernani), and Les deux Foscari in 1846. Marie Escudier first met Verdi in Milan in 1845, the same year Verdi ceded rights for publication of his works in France to the Escudiers (October), and Marie's first letter to Verdi has been commonly said to predate June 30, 1845. Providing that our assumption that the present letter is, indeed, to Marie Escudier, we now know that Verdi's first letter to Marie dates back to October of 1844. Marie Escudier was Verdi's correspondent through 1847; his brother Léon took over in either the summer or autumn of that year, informing Verdi about events in France and acting as intermediary between Verdi and impresarios, theater directors, singers, and librettists in France. Their relationship terminated in 1877 due to disagreements regarding the staging of the first performance of Aida in Paris, at the Théâtre Italien. The two operas that Verdi refers to in the present letter as writing for Naples and Venice were Alzira (first performed in Naples at the Teatro di San Carlo on August 12, 1845) and Attila (first performed in Venice at the Teatro La Fenice on March 17, 1846). The "Sigr. Vatel" referred to in the letter is August-Eugene Vatel, director of the Théâtre Italian in Paris at the time. Verdi went to Paris and attended the Opéra for the first time on June 1, 1847; Jérusalem premiered there on November 26th; "Sigr. Torre" can be identified as Giuseppe Torre, a poet and author of the text of many romanzas. I Lombardi was the first of Verdi's operas to be staged in the United States; it premiered at Palmo's Opera House in New York City on March 3, 1847. Palmo's, located on Chambers Street between Broadway and Centre Street, was one of the earliest opera houses in New York City. We would like to thank Dr. Daniela Macchione for her kind assistance in our preparation of this description.. 2 pp. Octavo. With decorative embossed blindstamp ("BATH") to upper inner left corner. An important letter regarding I Lombardi, including commentary regarding orchestration for the character of Pagano, the necessity for a large orchestra and choir, staging, the composer's plans to write operas for Naples and Venice, future performances of his works, etc. Verdi states that he has written to his publisher Ricordi about the part for Pagano "arranged for baritone with the orchestra properly adjusted." He describes the opera as his "most difficult" and states that, "in addition to the three principal artists, it also needs a ensemble of orchestra and choruses" in order that the work be properly staged. The composer goes on to say that he will write for Naples and Venice next year, and that he "will be free in two years from now, that is to say from October 1845 to March 1847" if Mr. Vatel would like to discuss the possibility of making a "deal," but Verdi would like one of his operas to be performed before then. He then states that a "Mr. Torre of Genoa" has given him a Romanza that he will set to music as soon as he has "a spare moment." In closing, Verdi thanks Escudier for his "kind words and for the care [he] takes of giving notoriety" to the composer's "poor name." Browned, especially at upper edge; small old tapemark; creased at folds and somewhat overall; small pinholes. Archivally repaired and restored.

      [Bookseller: J & J Lubrano Music Antiquarians LLC]
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        Laufenburg. \"Als Erinnerung den Mitgliedern des Sängervereins vom 25ten Mai 1843 gewidmet\". Souveniransicht, mittig mit Gesamtansicht, umgeben von 12 Detailansichten. Alt kolorierte Lithographie von G. Gersbach in Säckingen nach Franz Josef Egg.

      Säckingen, 1843. Format 34,5 x 45 cm. Blattgröße: 44 x 52 cm. Gerahmt. *Seltene Souveniransicht, aus Anlaß eines örtlichen Sängerjubiläums gedruckt. - Gut erhalten, nur am Unterrand mittig mit kleineren Papierläsuren und etwas wasserfleckig (weit außerhalb der Darstellung). Versand D: 5,00 EUR

      [Bookseller: Antiquariat Braun]
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        ASIE CENTRALE. Recherches sur les chaînes de montagnes et la climatologie comparée.

      Gide, Paris 1843 - Prima edizione. Testo francese. Opera completa in tre volumi. Cm.20,8x13. Pg.LVIII, 572; 560; 616. Legature in mz.pelle con titoli e fregi decorativi in oro ai dorsi. Bruniture diffuse. Al terzo volume numerose tabelle comparative in grande formato ed una carta dell'Asia centrale, dal Mar Nero alla Cina, in formato cm.38x58, con piccola abrasione lungo una piegatura. Friedrich Heinrich Alexander Freiherr Von Humboldt (Berlino, 1769-1859), fratello dell'erudito Wilhelm, svolse attività di esploratore e fu naturalista e scienziato di vasta rinomanza. Il presente testo, in edizione originale, raccoglie dettagliatissime informazione sul viaggio compiuto nell'Asia centrale su commissione dello zar, cui l'opera è dedicata con preziosissime informazioni fisiche, geografiche, sismologiche, geologiche, meteorologiche, etc. 2050 gr. [Attributes: First Edition; Hard Cover]

      [Bookseller: studio bibliografico pera s.a.s.]
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        GREIFENBERG/Ammersee., "Theresia Mineralbad Greifenberg am Ammersee". Gesamtansicht.

      Lithographie von Alois Flad bei Th. Kammerer, München, 1843, 14,5 x 21 cm. Lentner 8065. - Aus Vinzenz Müller, Heilquellen des Königreichs Bayern. - Geglättete Faltspuren, sonst tadellos. BAYERN, Oberbayern

      [Bookseller: Buch- und Kunstantiquariat]
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        GREIFENBERG/Ammersee. "Theresia Mineralbad Greifenberg am Ammersee". Gesamtansicht.

      - Lithographie von Alois Flad bei Th. Kammerer, München, 1843, 14,5 x 21 cm. Lentner 8065. - Aus Vinzenz Müller, Heilquellen des Königreichs Bayern. - Geglättete Faltspuren, sonst tadellos.

      [Bookseller: Peter Bierl Buch- & Kunstantiquariat]
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        Primary Source Manuscript of John Holt of Garthorpe - Pioneering Trader and Shipowner

      A rare primary source manuscript yielding very specific details about the Holt family's trade activities prior to expanding to Africa. North Lincolnshire, England, Belgium, 14 December 1843 to 17 June 1856. Original manuscript shipping ledger journal kept by merchant and sloop shipmaster John Holt of Garthorpe, conceivably being the uncle (born 1822) and namesake of the famous John Holt (1841-1917) who subsequently founded the pioneering Liverpool-West Africa shipping company still operating today as John Holt plc. Features at least six John Holt signature incsriptions. 8vo. 194 pages in manuscript. Original vellum binding with working brass clasp and orange marbled endpapers. While much is known about renowned merchant and shipping magnate John Holt (1841-1917) and his brothers with whom he partnered in the West Africa trade, very little detail is readily available on the shipping activities of his predecessors and mentors. [Of the freight transport and trade activities prior to the founding of John Holt & Co. (Liverpool) Ltd in 1884, the only known archive of Holt family papers is held by the National Archives, which spans from 1703 to 1965.] The present volume comprises a firsthand record of the commercial shipping activities in and outside of England made by a John Holt of Garthorpe six years before the famous John Holt of Garthorpe's voyage to Fernando Po, and thirty years prior to the founding of John Holt and Company which established trading posts and banking in West Africa. The writer may quite rightly be the uncle and namesake of the great businessman and company founder. As he plied the English coast and continent, then explored foreign trade, John Holt of Garthorpe, keeper of the present journal, dutifully penned a ledger of expenses and accounts. The volume beginning in 1843 and pertaining largely to freight transport on the rivers of North Lincolnshire. His entries, however, further reveal the start of coastal trade from the northeast to the south coast of England, and, in the latter years, we notice substantial increase in the number of port towns visited for trade. His pioneering voyages to continental Europe in 1853 show the Holt family's subsequent beginnings in foreign trade, and foretell the imminent success which would build favourable and profitable Anglo-African trade relations for centuries to follow. Tirelessly ferrying all kinds of cargo throughout North Lincolnshire and centering around the Isle of Axholme for several years, he frequently transported gravel, cobble and binding agents, which is consistent with the ongoing construction of navigable canals, as well as railways, in this period. The Barton-on-Humber railway station, for example, was opened as part of the branch line from New Holland to Barton-on-Humber in 1849. Ale was also frequently transported. Deliveries of cargo were made to the following locations in North Lincolnshire: the ancient Parish called Belton (near Epworth), Crowle, Luddington (now Luddington and Haldenby), West Butterwick, Spalding on the River Welland in the South Holland district, Gunhouse [Gunness], Burringham on the east bank of the river Trent, Grimsby, Boothferry and Goole, and the Parish of Althorpe - one of the eight original parishes in the Isle of Axholme (now Keadby with Althorpe). Hull, in the East Riding of Yorkshire, is a principle port, and from here he frequently ships potatoes and other goods as far as London. Barton is also mentioned [Barton-upon-Humbler across the river from Hull]. Some clients are named. On 19 August 1848 he delivered 70 tons of 'cliff' for Baronet Sir Robert Sheffield, whom in 1842 had purchased the old Healey estate in Frodingham, together with a Charles Winn. [This was either Sir Robert Sheffield, 4th Baronet (1796-1862), Major of the North Lincolnshire Yeomanry, Justice of the Peace, High Sherriff of Lincolnshire, and politician, or possibly his eldest son Sir Robert Sheffield, 5th Baronet (1823-1886) who also served as High Sherriff of Lincolnshire.] In the 1850's Holt's inland business was expanding greatly, with new clients at Gainsborough, Dunkirk, Ispwich, Wisbech, Rochester, Newcastle, and Lowestoft. Large quantities of tiles were sent to London during this period, 36,000 tiles, 45,000 tiles, as well as fire clay and fire bricks. On 10 February 1855 the usual cargo of potatoes was brought to London, and this time two bells as well. Reflecting the prosperity refinement of the Victorian era, at Hull he delivered marble, mahogany, iron and barrels of resin. In 1851, a notable change occurred when Holt took his business to the sea coast. His first coastal voyage was for a substantial delivery being made on 12 July, consisting of stone, machinery, several carts and wagons, paint, and oil, quite possibly for the expansion of the Southampton West End railway station which was constructed in 1847, and its terminus at Blechynden Terrace which came into use in 1850. [Developments continued until 1860, by which time the station was equipped with a booking office and two waiting rooms on the up and down platforms. The Southampton and Dorchester Railway Company, having amalgamated with the large London and South Western Railway (LSWR) in 1848, was expanding and improving its lines at this time.] Fees incurred on this voyage included dues payable at Dover and Ramsgate, boomage and quay dues, over and above the regular expenses. In 1853, Holt was making voyages along the northern sea coast of England, with a delivery of timber to the famous shipbuilding town of Whitby, where Captain Cook learned seamanship. In the same year he shipped 108 tons of coal to Harwich, 86 tons of shingles to Hull. Sunderland also became a relatively frequent port. Finally, crossing the North Sea in 1853 for the first time with commercial cargo, the sloop called "Gutteridge" transported 104 tons of guano to Antwerp in Belgium; a cargo of machinery is subsequently brought to Brussels; these being the first steps in foreign shipping for John Holt of Garthorpe. Fees and expenses tallied throughout the volume include wharfage, bridge dues, tariffs paid to the Lord Mayor of London, separate canal dues in London, Humber dues, pilotage. In April 1846 he pays dues paid on 15 horses and some ale, evidently trying his hand at transporting live animals. In Hull, January 1847, a delivery of cement stone and hoops requires payment of dock dues, buoyage, corporation fee, entrance fee, and house commissions. Dues are occasionally paid at Spurn [The lifeboat station at Spurn Head was built in 1810, on the north bank of the mouth of the Humber estuary. Owing to the remote location, houses for the lifeboat crew and their families were added a few years later]. In addition, he pays a boatswain, a waterman, and other hired labour from time to time. During this thirteen years of trade, Holt had at least 3 sloops, "Friends" from 1843-1849, "Acorn" from 1849-1851, and "Gutteridge" from 1851-1856. These were all made by shipbuilder John Wray (1796-1884) of Burton Stather. By 1851 he employed sixteen men. An interesting connection may be realized through this volume. The keeper of this ledger, John Holt, inscribes a note to remember his wedding to 'Sarah' on 16 October 1845. The 1851 census states that John Wray had a niece named Sarah. Making the connection between merchant and sloop shipmaster John Holt of Garthorpe who wrote the present ledger, and the famous John Holt of Garthorpe (1841-1917) who subsequently founded the Liverpool-West Africa shipping company: From the Holt family of Garthorpe there were many in the shipping trade, from shipwrights and sailmasters, to shipowners, and leading merchants, the most famous of them being the brothers who established a shipping trade in West Africa. With ancestral origins in Broughton Grange, they established firms in Liverpool, including John Holt & Co Ltd, West Africa Traders & Shipowners. Needing no introduction, John Holt (1841-1915) was an English merchant who founded the most significant shipping line which operated between Liverpool and West Africa, and a number of businesses in Nigeria, which are now incorporated in John Holt plc. Born on the 31 October 1841 in Garthorpe, Lincolnshire, he first worked for his grandfather, learning the sea trade at an exceptionally young age. Subsequently, at the age of fifteen, he became the apprentice of William Laird, a Liverpool coal dealer. Just prior to completing his apprenticeship, in 1862 he went to Fernando Po to take up an appointment as secretary to James Lynslager, formerly acting British Consul who was pursuing his personal commercial interests. [Sir Richard Burton had just entered the Foreign Service as consul of the island.] There he managed Lynslager's trading post. Five years later, he bought out his employer, and he was joined by his brother Jonathan. In 1868 Johnathan bought a schooner, which enabled the brothers to open more trading posts in West Africa. In 1874 the brothers opened an office in Liverpool. In 1881, John entered the palm oil trade. In 1884 the brothers formed a partnership, John Holt and Company. Falling in line with family tradition, his father, Thomas Godfrey Holt (born 1817 Luddington, Lincolnshire - died 1909 Appleby, Lincolnshire), was a shipowner and merchant as well. It was he, who arranged for his son, the famous John Holt of Garthope, to apprenticeship under Laird for five years. The original indenture document between William Laird and Thomas Godfrey Holt is held in the Liverpool Maritime Museum Archives. [The 1856 gazetteer and directory of Lincolnshire lists both Thomas Holt (father) and John Holt (son) as master mariners at Garthorpe on the Isle of Axholme. Thomas is also described as a coal merchant, vessel owner and victualler, of "Sheffield Arms", Ferry, having purchased the "Sheffield Arms Inn" at Burton upon Stather.] Especially interesting in reference to the present volume, his paternal uncle and namesake was John Holt, born 1822 in Burton-upon-Stather, quite likely the author of the present volume, and surely another source of inspiration for setting out to Africa in the first place, to learn about foreign commerce. His grandfather, Thomas Holt (born 1788 All Saints, Flixborough - married Elizabeth Godfrey in Luddington church on 28 June 1814 - died 1863 Luddington), was a sea merchant of notable repute. He is listed in census as a sailor in 1815 and a ship master by 1817, at these times his surname was spelled Hoult. He is mentioned in the coastal trade archives, and found in several articles of the Hull Packet Newspaper. He received a master's certificate for having worked 43 years in coastal trade. The record states: "Thomas Holt, Born at Crosby, Lincolnshire, 12 September 1788, has been employed in the capacities of App & Master 43 years in the British Merchant Service in the Coasting Trade." He travelled as far as Constantinople and St. Petersburg. There is a burial recorded at Luddington on 20th February 1863, for a Thomas Holt, of Garthorpe, aged 74. Historical records confirm that Thomas & Elizabeth Holt had between them at least six children, 4 boys and 2 girls between 1815 & 1827, as follows: •William, born 1815 •Thomas Godfrey, born 1817 (father of famed business founder John Holt of Garthorpe) •Elizabeth, born 1820 in Luddington, baptised in Burton upon Stather on 17 September 1820 where the family resided •John, born on 20 July 1822, baptised in Burton upon Stather, the family living in "The Stather", close to the shore of the River Trent, his father Thomas being recorded as being a waterman •William Leonard, born 1825, baptised at Burton upon Stather, 7 February 1825, the family living in "The Stather", his father Thomas recorded as being a mariner •Mary Ann, born 1827, baptised at Luddington 27 December 1827, the family are once again in Garthorpe, and Thomas described as a master mariner. The family made frequent moves between Burton upon Stather, Luddington, and Garthorpe. The village of Garthorpe in North Lincolnshire, in the Isle of Axholme, is situated approximately 8 miles (13 km) south-east from Goole, and 1 mile (1.6 km) west from the River Trent, is the home of John Holt, writer of the present ledger, and also John Holt founder of the renowned West Africa shipping company. It is contiguous with the village of Fockerby. [Garthorpe of North Lincolnshire should not be confused with the village by the same name, and civil parish (called Garthorpe and Fockerby) in the Melton district of Leicestershire.] In 1833, "Bartholomew's Gazetteer of Britain" describes the Isle of Axholme as follows: "Area of slight elevation above flat and formerly marshy tract bounded by the Rivers Trent, Torne and Idle. Towns include Crowle, Belton, Epworth and Haxey on higher ground and Owston Ferry and West Butterwick beside the River Trent."

      [Bookseller: Voyager Press Rare Books & Manuscripts]
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        THAMES TUNNEL PEEPSHOW

      1843 - circa 1843. Good condition with no wrapper. 1200 feet long, 76 feet below high water mark, was 8 years building and cost £446,000, opened the 25th day of March 1843. Bound accordion style, 4 hand--coloured scenes (includes front cover which has 2 holes cut out - peepholes). Contained in a slipcase with onlay to front (same as front cover of book). Rear cover is creased and colour (black) has been touched up to rear cover and edges of front cover. I think that the slipcase has been repaired/reinforced. [R] [Attributes: Hard Cover]

      [Bookseller: Stella & Rose's Books, PBFA]
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        Tentamen florae Basileensis exhibens plantas phanereogamas sponte nascentes secundum systema sexuale digestas. Adjectis Bauhinis synonymis ope horti ejus sicci comprobatis.

      Basel, J. Georg Neukirch, 1821-1843. - 2 Bände + Supplement in 2 Bänden. 8°. XVIII, 450 S., 1 Bl.; VIII, 537 S; 2 Bl, 220 S. Mit einem gestochenen Porträt im ersten Band, 2 kolorierten lithographierten Tafeln in Band eins und einer lithographierten, kolorierten Tafel im Supplement von Labram. Grüne Halblederbände der Zeit mit klassizistischer Rückenvergoldung. Pritzel 3694. - Erste vollständige Ausgabe mit dem seltenen Supplementband. 1847 erschien in Band sieben der "Basler Berichte" S. 114-126 noch ein weiterer Nachtrag. Das Porträt in Band eins mit Caspar Bauhin. - Erster Band zu Beginn mit schwächer werdendem Wasserrand. Vereinzelt leicht gebräunt und stockfleckig. - Dekorativ gebundenes Exemplar.

      [Bookseller: Daniel Thierstein]
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        Theatre Academique der rühmlichst bekannten Italienischen Künstlergesellschaft des Signor Felix Napoli, verbunden mit der weltberühmten Somnambule, Nachfolgerin der Mad. Lenormand. (Unterzeichner:) Heinrich Frank & Cie.

      Plakat mit Holzschnitt (14 x 13 cm). Blattgr.: 59 x 21,5 cm. Als Nachfolgerinnen der berühmten französischen Wahrsagerin Marie Anne Lenormand (gest. 1843) bezeichneten sich zahlreiche Gauklerinnen auf europäischen Jahrmärkten. - Neben diesem Auftritt gab es u. a. noch: Ikarische Sylphidenspiele Die beiden schwebenden Tambours, Große Zauberkraft-Production, ausgeführt von Signor Felix Napoli, und eine "Gallerie lebender Bilder". - Der hübsche Holzschnitt zeigt die Wahrsagerin mit verbunden Augen und einen feinen Herrn, dem wohl gerade die Zukunft vorhergesagt wird.

      [Bookseller: Antiquariat Turszynski]
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        Welttheater. Mit hoher obrigkeitlicher Bewilligung werden Unterzeichnete (...) folgende Vorstellungen, bestehend aus malerischen (pittoresken) Ansichten und Kunstwerken welche dem Auge Nachahmung der anmuthigsten Schönheiten der Natur darbieten, in 5 Abtheilungen zu geben die Ehre haben.(Unterzeichner:) Lorgie & Loew.

      (München, 1843).. Plakat mit Holzschnitt und typograph. Text im Rahmen. Blattgr.: 41 x 23,5 cm. Neben zwei Panoramen zeigten Lorgie und Loew auch das "Ein mechanisches Kunstballet mit neuen Abwechslungen" und "Automatische Seiltänzer". Zum Beschluss: "Der Brand von Hamburg. nach der Natur aufgenommen und dargestellt. Diese Ansicht wird mit den dazu gehörigen Feuerwerken die resp. Zuschauer gewiß recht überraschen". - Friedrich Lorgie trat unter eigenem Namen noch bis Mitte der 1850er Jahre auf. - Am linken Rand unten mit geringem Papierverlust.

      [Bookseller: Antiquariat Turszynski]
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        The Naturalist's Library; Entomology (3 Vols. )

      Edinburgh: W.H. Lizars, 1843. 12mo. Three volumes :Introduction to Entomology: Vol. 34, 331pp., 31 plates. Bees: Volume 6. 301pp., 32 plates and shows how to construct bee hives for collecting honey. Beetles: Volume 2, 269pp., 32 plates. Each include frontispiece and engraved vignette title page. Several plates re hand colored. Bound in 3/4 maroon morocco over marbled paper covered boards, raised bands gilt, double brown morocco spine labels gilt, internally fresh with an occasional off-setting from plate to text, bindings rubbed.

      [Bookseller: Alcuin Books, ABAA-ILAB ]
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        Trésors des églises de Reims. Ouvrage orné de planches dessinées et lithographiées par J.-J. Maquart.

      Reims, Imprimerie de Assy et Cie, 1843. - In-4, rel. moderne demi-basane bordeaux, dos à nerfs, orné de filets dorés, pièces de titre vertes, couv. sup. conservée, [2]ff.-II-338 pp., 32 planches lithographiées sur papier fort h.-t. Index, table des planches. EDITION ORIGINALE. Quelques rares rousseurs, certaines plus marquées en marges de certaines planches. Bel ex. [Attributes: Hard Cover]

      [Bookseller: Librairie Le Trait d'Union sarl.]
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        The Battle of Motomutsuka.

      The size specified here includes current acid-free mount.

      [Bookseller: Henry Sotheran Ltd.]
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        Nouveau manuel complet pour la fabrication des poids et mesures, contenant en général tout ce qui concerne les Arts du Balancier et du Potier d'étain, et seulement ce qui est relatif à la fabrication des Poids et Mesures dans les Arts du fondeur, du ferblantier, du boisselier, etc. Ouvrage orné d'un grand nombre de figures.

      Paris, Roret 1843 - in-12 (14,7 X 10 cm), faux-titre, titre + 284 pp., pleine reliure d'époque chagrin rouge, dos à 4 nerfs orné, encadrements de filets or sur les plats avec armoiries au centre, filet sur les coupes, dentelle intérieure, tranches dorées. Rare manuel Roret, bien complet des douze planches dépliantes. Bel Exemplaire, aux armes du Pape PIE IX (Jean-Marie, comte de Mastaï Ferretti, né à Sinegaglia, le 13 mai 1792, mort le 7 février 1878, élu pape sous le nom de PIE IX). (un cahier bruni, quelques rousseurs). Notice BNF n° 31181759. [Attributes: First Edition; Hard Cover]

      [Bookseller: H. PICARD ET FILS, depuis 1902]
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        Apauly-Tustennugge

      Philadelphia: Daniel Rice & James G. Clark, 1843. Hand-coloured lithograph. Very good condition apart from some overall light soiling and slight offsetting with image. A fine image from McKenney and Hall's 'Indian Tribes of North America': `One of the most important [works] ever published on the American Indians' (Field),` a landmark in American culture' (Horan) and an invaluable contemporary record of a vanished way of life. A sensible Creek chief and a courageous warrior, Apauly-Tustennugge (Tustenugge means "Warrior" or "Chieftan") was a member of the Creek delegation that went to Washington in 1826 to dispute the validity of the 1825 Indian Springs Treaty and sign the Treaty of Washington, in which the Creeks were permitted to retain a small portion of their land on the Alabama-Georgia border. However, the white settlers in Alabama soon began to agitate for their removal, which followed soon thereafter. The Creek (Muskoke), was one of the principal tribes in mid-south and later one of the Five Civilized Tribes, inhabited the Southeastern region of the United States until they were removed to Arkansas and Oklahoma. McKenney and Hall's 'Indian Tribes of North America' has long been renowned for its faithful portraits of Native Americans. The portraits are largely based on paintings by the artist Charles Bird King, who was employed by the War Department to paint the Indian delegates visiting Washington D.C., forming the basis of the War Department's Indian Gallery. Most of King's original paintings were subsequently destroyed in a fire at the Smithsonian, and their appearance in McKenney and Hall's magnificent work is thus our only record of the likenesses of many of the most prominent Indian leaders of the nineteenth century. Numbered among King's sitters were Sequoyah, Red Jacket, Major Ridge, Keokuk, and Black Hawk. After six years as Superintendent of Indian Trade, Thomas McKenney had become concerned for the survival of the Western tribes. He had observed unscrupulous individuals taking advantage of the Native Americans for profit, and his vocal warnings about their future prompted his appointment by President Monroe to the Office of Indian Affairs. As first director, McKenney was to improve the administration of Indian programs in various government offices. His first trip was during the summer of 1826 to the Lake Superior area for a treaty with the Chippewa, opening mineral rights on their land. In 1827, he journeyed west again for a treaty with the Chippewa, Menominee , and Winebago in the present state of Michigan. His journeys provided an unparalleled opportunity to become acquainted with Native American tribes. When President Jackson dismissed him from his government post in 1830, McKenney was able to turn more of his attention to his publishing project. Within a few years, he was joined by James Hall, a lawyer who had written extensively about the west. McKenney and Hall saw their work as a way of preserving an accurate visual record of a rapidly disappearing culture. (Gilreath). Cf. BAL 6934; cf. Bennett p.79; cf. Field 992; cf. Howes M129; cf. Lipperhiede Mc4; cf. Reese, Stamped With A National Character p. 24; Sabin 43410a.

      [Bookseller: Donald Heald Rare Books]
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        Samuel Sowerby; or, Doings at Ravensdale Priory. By the author of "Captain Bolio," "Fred Hamilton," &c

      London: Willoughby & Co., Warwick Lane and Smithfield, 1843. First edition. 20 steel engravings by "Phiz". 316, [8, ads] pp. 1 vols. 8vo. Original brown blind stamped cloth. Fine in slipcase and cloth chemise. First edition. 20 steel engravings by "Phiz". 316, [8, ads] pp. 1 vols. 8vo. Twenty of Hablot K. Browne's etchings for G. P. R. James's "The Commissioner" were used in "Samuel Sowerby"; the author is unknown and the text was written to match the illustrations.The British Library records "The Rambles of Captain Bolio. By Della" published in 1838; and assigns a provisional date of 1845 to the present title.Phiz in his prime was prolific and without equal. As G. K. Chesterton observed, "no other illustrator ever created the true Dickens characters with the precise and correct quantum of exaggeration. No other illustrator ever breathed the true Dickens atmosphere, in which clerks are clerks and yet at the same time elves" (cited in ODNB). In the present work, plates such as "The Insane Poet" and the final plate, "In at the Death", depicting a foxhunting accident, are as fine as anything he produced for Dickens. Wolff 7562 (dating to 1843); Block p. 205

      [Bookseller: James Cummins Bookseller ]
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        MOTHER GOOSE'S MELODIES. THE ONLY PURE EDITION...

      Munroe and Francis, 1843. An early printing in green morocco with gilt rule to the perimeter of the boards, rebacked with most of the morocco spine laid down, though part of the titling is lost. As Bleiler notes in his bibliography in the Dover edition of Mother Goose's Melodies [Dover Publications, 1970] "the various Munroe and Francis Mother Goose books have been unexpectedly complicated in their printing history ... each new copy examined adds further confusion" [p. 99]. A study of the complex bibliography places this copy in the Second Family of Munroe & Francis printings. ~~Bleiler notes that the chain of editions can be traced through type as well as in textual changes, and that in the "Dover Edition", the dot is missing "on the second 'sing' in 'Sing, Sing' " on page 11, indicating that the type is worn. This copy has the dot present, indicating perhaps that it is an earlier printing. The illustrations in this copy are mostly signed correctly.~~Several leaves were torn and have been repaired professionally. ~~An early example of the American Mother Goose, and a charming one. The provocative claim on the title page that the rhymes were found "in the same stone box as the Golden Plates of the Book of Mormon", and the uncommon verses "See Saw Margery Daw/ Sold her bed and lay upon straw, / Was she not a dirty slut, / To sell her bed and lay in the dirt?", along with other odd usages and delightful woodcuts, make this edition a delight.~.

      [Bookseller: Black Swan Books, Inc. ]
 38.   Check availability:     ABAA     Link/Print  


        Instructions for the Practice of Fresco Painting; As given in the reports of the commissioners on the fine arts, compiled and arranged by artists' colour-makers to the Queen, and to H. R. H. Prince Albert.

      London: Winsor & Newton, 1843 - Octavo (185 x 123 mm). Bound for presentation by Westleys & Clark in pale brown calf titles to front cover gilt, elaborate gilt frames to covers, spine fully gilt, edges gilt, yellow moiré endpapers. Binder's ticket to foot of rear pastedown. Slight bumps and rubbing to extremities, rubbing to joints, boards lightly soiled with a couple small scratches, very light foxing to prelims and endmatter; a very good copy. Black and white illustrations to text. First edition. Presentation copy, inscribed by the authors on the front free endpaper, "To C. Stanfield Esq. R. A., respectfully presented by his obedient humble servants, W. Winsor & H. Newton." The recipient was Clarkson Stanfield, elected as a Royal Academician in February 1835, who "between 1820 and his last submission in 1867 showed 135 paintings at the Royal Academy, his only absences being from 1822 to 1826, in 1828, and (owing to a tour) in 1839" (ODNB). He played an active role in the Royal Academy, repeatedly serving on their council, and in 1852 became a member of the hanging committee. Originally a theatre painter, Stanfield was described by Ruskin as, "the leader of the British Realists, and, next to Turner, the noblest master of cloud forms of all our artists" (ODNB). Winsor and Newton were the first developers of the commonly used glycerine based water colours, and have been important producers of art materials since they were established in 1832. An uncommon work, traced in seven institutions world-wide. [Attributes: First Edition; Signed Copy]

      [Bookseller: Peter Harrington. ABA member]
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        The Vicar of Wakefield.

      John Van Voorst, London 1843 - xv, 306 pp. With Thirty-two Illustrations by William Mulready. 8vo, full light brown crushed levant morocco Cosway-style binding signed by Riviere & Sons. The front cover features an oval miniature portrait of Goldsmith under glass, set within a quatrefoil panel, the whole elaborately tooled in gold. A.e.g. Moire silk ensheets; gilt turn-ins. Preserved in the original morocco-edged marbled slipcase. Very fine; entirely unrestored. [Attributes: Signed Copy; Hard Cover]

      [Bookseller: Jeffrey H. Marks, Rare Books, ABAA]
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        The Wonders of the Heavens, Being A Popular View of Astronomy, Including A Full Illustration of the Mechanism of the Heavens; Embracing the Sun, Moon, and Stars, with descriptions of The Planets, Comets, Fixed Stars, Double Stars, The Constellations, The Galaxy, or Milky-Way, The Zodiacal Light, Aurora Borealis, or Northern Lights, Meteors, Clouds, Falling Stars, Aerolites, &c...Illustrated by Numerous Maps and Engravings.

      Folio. New York: Robert P. Bixby & Co., 1843. Folio, viii, 371 pp., engraved frontis and engraved title followed by additional engraved frontis and typographic title, 10 full page engraved plates (mostly comprised of the cycles of the moon), six full-page fold-out color plates showing the constellations and the astrological figures representative of each, and many diagrams and illustrations in text, printed in two columns within double ruled borders. Marbled paper boards, rubbed, rebacked in gilt-stamped calf. Minor foxing on pages close to plates, slight creases to endpapers; very good. Later edition, first printed in Boston by American Stationers Co. 1837. This edition has been expanded with more engravings, both relief and intaglio. An early American imprint on astronomy, extensively illustrated, with magnificent full-page engravings of the phases of the moon. First edition noted in Bennet p. 17.

      [Bookseller: John Windle Antiquarian Bookseller]
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