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Displayed below are some selected recent viaLibri matches for books published in 1832

        Common Pheasant.

      London: The Birds of Europe. 1832-37. - Lithograph. Original colour. Size: 34 x 47 cm. (13½ x 18½ inches). Mounted size 57 x 69cm. Fine condition The Birds of Europe is the first of Gould's works to feature plates by Edward Lear. The greater number were drawn and lithographed by Elizabeth Gould, but a quarter of them were drawn and lithographed by Lear. All the plates were coloured under the direction of My Bayfield. Finally the printing was done by C. Hullmandel (Copenhagen/Anker). Engraved by LEAR, Edward.

      [Bookseller: Peter Harrington. ABA member]
 1.   Check availability:     AbeBooks     Link/Print  


        Little Egret - Ardea garzetta

      London 1832 - John Gould (1804-1881) A selection from Birds of Europe published in London 1832-37. Lithograph with original hand-coloring measuring 14 ½” x 21 ½” accompanied by corresponding natural history description written by John Gould. Condition: Very good. John Gould was without question the most prolific natural history artist of the nineteenth century. He worked during a period of intense fascination with discoveries in natural history, especially regarding knowledge of the wildlife of exotic lands. Gould shared the romantic enthusiasm of his time for such subjects, as well as the popular impulse to catalogue exotic wildlife. He combined his passion for natural history with outstanding scientific, artistic, and entrepreneurial talents. Drawing on these abilities, he embarked on a series of projects that would eventually make him the leading publisher of ornithological illustrations in Victorian Britain. Gould’s unparalleled career spanned five decades, and he produced a monumental series of books of birds throughout the world. Gould planned the Birds of Europe in an effort to redress the imbalance between the study of local and foreign ornithology. In his preface he stated his mission: “the Birds of Europe, in which we are, or ought to be, most interested, have not received that degree of attention which they naturally demand. The present work has been undertaken to supply that deficiency.” Gould portrayed birds native to Europe in a manner that had only been thought appropriate for the colorful species of distant places. In this way he managed to draw much popular interest back to native birds, which were suddenly considered equally beautiful to exotic species. Rich, vibrant color is an important attribute of the best 19th Century prints. Many prints by John Gould found on the market today have modern color that affects both the appearance and the value of these great works. John Gould died in 1881 still actively illustrating and producing fine bird books. His stock of unsold copies, unbound text and plates in various states, lithographic stones, drawings and paintings, amounted to nearly three tons. Many of the uncolored pulls from his monumental "Birds of Europe" have been recolored in the last thirty years, and these are often found on the market. Fortunately, the difference between original and modern color can be discerned by looking carefully at the print. When modern color is applied to 180 year old paper, the application is inconsistent; the cellulose of the aged paper has begun to breakdown and can no longer evenly absorb the watercolors, resulting in a splotchy uneven appearance All of the Gould bird prints in Arader Galleries' inventory have exquisite original color. The vastly superior quality of original color can be clearly differentiated from new color by its smooth and even appearance. The inks have noticeably deeper, richer tones. The difference can also be seen in the lovely surface "sheen" that results from the application of gum arabic when the lithograph was first pulled. The hand coloring of engravings and lithographs reached its zenith in the 19th Century. Works that still display their original color are more rewarding to view, and will better hold their value in the years to come.

      [Bookseller: Arader Galleries San Francisco]
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        Capercailzie or Cock of the Wood - Tetrao urogallus

      London 1832 - This splendid hand-colored, folio size lthograph from John Gould's (1804-1881)monumental book "Birds of Europe" is in excellent condition, measures 14 ½” x 21 ½” and magnificently displays the author's scientific skill and attention to detail. John Gould was without question the most prolific natural history artist of the nineteenth century. He worked during a period of intense fascination with discoveries in natural history, especially regarding knowledge of the wildlife of exotic lands. Gould shared the romantic enthusiasm of his time for such subjects, as well as the popular impulse to catalog exotic wildlife. He combined his passion for natural history with outstanding scientific, artistic, and entrepreneurial talents. Drawing on these abilities, he embarked on a series of projects that would eventually make him the leading publisher of ornithological illustrations in Victorian Britain. Gould’s unparalleled career spanned five decades, and he produced a monumental series of books of birds throughout the world. Gould planned the Birds of Europe in an effort to redress the imbalance between the study of local and foreign ornithology. In his preface he stated his mission: “the Birds of Europe, in which we are, or ought to be, most interested, have not received that degree of attention which they naturally demand. The present work has been undertaken to supply that deficiency.” Gould portrayed birds native to Europe in a manner that had only been thought appropriate for the colorful species of distant places. In this way he managed to draw much popular interest back to native birds, which were suddenly considered equally beautiful to exotic species. Rich, vibrant color is an important attribute of the best 19th Century prints. Many prints by John Gould found on the market today have modern color that affects both the appearance and the value of these great works. John Gould died in 1881 still actively illustrating and producing fine bird books. His stock of unsold copies, unbound text and plates in various states, lithographic stones, drawings and paintings, amounted to nearly three tons. Many of the uncolored pulls from his monumental "Birds of Europe" have been recolored in the last thirty years, and these are often found on the market. Fortunately, the difference between original and modern color can be discerned by looking carefully at the print. When modern color is applied to 180 year old paper, the application is inconsistent; the cellulose of the aged paper has begun to breakdown and can no longer evenly absorb the watercolors, resulting in a splotchy uneven appearance All of the Gould bird prints in Arader Galleries' inventory have exquisite original color. The vastly superior quality of original color can be clearly differentiated from new color by its smooth and even appearance. The inks have noticeably deeper, richer tones. The difference can also be seen in the lovely surface "sheen" that results from the application of gum arabic when the lithograph was first pulled. The hand coloring of engravings and lithographs reached its zenith in the 19th Century. Works that still display their original color are more rewarding to view, and will better hold their value in the years to come.

      [Bookseller: Arader Galleries San Francisco]
 3.   Check availability:     AbeBooks     Link/Print  


        Common Bittern - Botaurus stellarus

      London 1832 - John Gould (1804-1881) A selection from Birds of Europe published in London 1832-37. Lithograph with original hand-coloring measuring 14 ½” x 21 ½” accompanied by corresponding natural history description written by John Gould. Condition: Very good. John Gould was without question the most prolific natural history artist of the nineteenth century. He worked during a period of intense fascination with discoveries in natural history, especially regarding knowledge of the wildlife of exotic lands. Gould shared the romantic enthusiasm of his time for such subjects, as well as the popular impulse to catalogue exotic wildlife. He combined his passion for natural history with outstanding scientific, artistic, and entrepreneurial talents. Drawing on these abilities, he embarked on a series of projects that would eventually make him the leading publisher of ornithological illustrations in Victorian Britain. Gould’s unparalleled career spanned five decades, and he produced a monumental series of books of birds throughout the world. Gould planned the Birds of Europe in an effort to redress the imbalance between the study of local and foreign ornithology. In his preface he stated his mission: “the Birds of Europe, in which we are, or ought to be, most interested, have not received that degree of attention which they naturally demand. The present work has been undertaken to supply that deficiency.” Gould portrayed birds native to Europe in a manner that had only been thought appropriate for the colorful species of distant places. In this way he managed to draw much popular interest back to native birds, which were suddenly considered equally beautiful to exotic species. Rich, vibrant color is an important attribute of the best 19th Century prints. Many prints by John Gould found on the market today have modern color that affects both the appearance and the value of these great works. John Gould died in 1881 still actively illustrating and producing fine bird books. His stock of unsold copies, unbound text and plates in various states, lithographic stones, drawings and paintings, amounted to nearly three tons. Many of the uncolored pulls from his monumental "Birds of Europe" have been recolored in the last thirty years, and these are often found on the market. Fortunately, the difference between original and modern color can be discerned by looking carefully at the print. When modern color is applied to 180 year old paper, the application is inconsistent; the cellulose of the aged paper has begun to breakdown and can no longer evenly absorb the watercolors, resulting in a splotchy uneven appearance All of the Gould bird prints in Arader Galleries' inventory have exquisite original color. The vastly superior quality of original color can be clearly differentiated from new color by its smooth and even appearance. The inks have noticeably deeper, richer tones. The difference can also be seen in the lovely surface "sheen" that results from the application of gum arabic when the lithograph was first pulled. The hand coloring of engravings and lithographs reached its zenith in the 19th Century. Works that still display their original color are more rewarding to view, and will better hold their value in the years to come.

      [Bookseller: Arader Galleries San Francisco]
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        Gadwall. Anas strepera; (linn) Chauliodes strepera; (Swains)

      London 1832 - John Gould (1804-1881). A selection from Gould's Birds of Europe, published in London 1832-1837, printed by C. Hullmandel. Lithograph with original hand-coloring measuring 14 ½” x 21 ½”. Condition: Very good. John Gould was without question the most prolific natural history artist of the nineteenth century. He worked during a period of intense fascination with discoveries in natural history, especially regarding knowledge of the wildlife of exotic lands. Gould shared the romantic enthusiasm of his time for such subjects, as well as the popular impulse to catalogue exotic wildlife. He combined his passion for natural history with outstanding scientific, artistic, and entrepreneurial talents. Drawing on these abilities, he embarked on a series of projects that would eventually make him the leading publisher of ornithological illustrations in Victorian Britain. The preparatory drawings that he produced were passed on for completion to skilled illustrators, most notably his wife, Elizabeth, and Edward Lear. The plates which resulted from such partnerships were a splendid fusion of art and science, with a scope that remains unsurpassed. Stunning and at the same time highly accurate, Gould's illustrations linked beauty to science, and science to beauty, in and an unprecedented manner. Gould’s unparalleled career spanned five decades, and he produced a monumental series of books of birds throughout the world. Gould planned the Birds of Europe in an effort to redress the imbalance between the study of local and foreign ornithology. In his preface he stated his mission: “the Birds of Europe, in which we are, or ought to be, most interested, have not received that degree of attention which they naturally demand. The present work has been undertaken to supply that deficiency.” Gould portrayed birds native to Europe in a manner that had only been thought appropriate for the colorful species of distant places. In this way he managed to draw much popular interest back to native birds, which were suddenly considered equally beautiful to exotic species. Rich, vibrant color is an important attribute of the best 19th Century prints. Many prints by John Gould found on the market today have modern color that affects both the appearance and the value of these great works. John Gould died in 1881 still actively illustrating and producing fine bird books. His stock of unsold copies, unbound text and plates in various states, lithographic stones, drawings and paintings, amounted to nearly three tons. Many of the uncolored pulls from his monumental "Birds of Europe" have been re-colored in the last thirty years, and these are often found on the market. Fortunately, the difference between original and modern color can be discerned by looking carefully at the print. When modern color is applied to 180 year old paper, the application is inconsistent; the cellulose of the aged paper has begun to breakdown and can no longer evenly absorb the watercolors, resulting in a splotchy uneven appearance All of the Gould bird prints in Arader Galleries' inventory have exquisite original color. The vastly superior quality of original color can be clearly differentiated from new color by its smooth and even appearance. The inks have noticeably deeper, richer tones. The difference can also be seen in the lovely surface "sheen" that results from the application of gum arabic when the lithograph was first pulled. The hand coloring of engravings and lithographs reached its zenith in the 19th Century. Works that still display their original color are more rewarding to view, and will better hold their value in the years to come.

      [Bookseller: Arader Galleries San Francisco]
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        Freckled Bittern - Botaurus letiginosus

      London 1832 - John Gould (1804-1881) A selection from Birds of Europe published in London 1832-37. Lithograph with original hand-coloring measuring 14 ½” x 21 ½” accompanied by corresponding natural history description written by John Gould. Condition: Very good. John Gould was without question the most prolific natural history artist of the nineteenth century. He worked during a period of intense fascination with discoveries in natural history, especially regarding knowledge of the wildlife of exotic lands. Gould shared the romantic enthusiasm of his time for such subjects, as well as the popular impulse to catalogue exotic wildlife. He combined his passion for natural history with outstanding scientific, artistic, and entrepreneurial talents. Drawing on these abilities, he embarked on a series of projects that would eventually make him the leading publisher of ornithological illustrations in Victorian Britain. Gould’s unparalleled career spanned five decades, and he produced a monumental series of books of birds throughout the world. Gould planned the Birds of Europe in an effort to redress the imbalance between the study of local and foreign ornithology. In his preface he stated his mission: “the Birds of Europe, in which we are, or ought to be, most interested, have not received that degree of attention which they naturally demand. The present work has been undertaken to supply that deficiency.” Gould portrayed birds native to Europe in a manner that had only been thought appropriate for the colorful species of distant places. In this way he managed to draw much popular interest back to native birds, which were suddenly considered equally beautiful to exotic species. Rich, vibrant color is an important attribute of the best 19th Century prints. Many prints by John Gould found on the market today have modern color that affects both the appearance and the value of these great works. John Gould died in 1881 still actively illustrating and producing fine bird books. His stock of unsold copies, unbound text and plates in various states, lithographic stones, drawings and paintings, amounted to nearly three tons. Many of the uncolored pulls from his monumental "Birds of Europe" have been recolored in the last thirty years, and these are often found on the market. Fortunately, the difference between original and modern color can be discerned by looking carefully at the print. When modern color is applied to 180 year old paper, the application is inconsistent; the cellulose of the aged paper has begun to breakdown and can no longer evenly absorb the watercolors, resulting in a splotchy uneven appearance All of the Gould bird prints in Arader Galleries' inventory have exquisite original color. The vastly superior quality of original color can be clearly differentiated from new color by its smooth and even appearance. The inks have noticeably deeper, richer tones. The difference can also be seen in the lovely surface "sheen" that results from the application of gum arabic when the lithograph was first pulled. The hand coloring of engravings and lithographs reached its zenith in the 19th Century. Works that still display their original color are more rewarding to view, and will better hold their value in the years to come.

      [Bookseller: Arader Galleries San Francisco]
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        Magpie - Pica caudata

      London 1832 - This splendid hand-colored, folio size lithograph from John Gould's (1804-1881) monumental work "Birds of Europe" is in excellent condition, measures 14 ½” x 21 ½” and magnificently displays the author's scientific skill and attention to detail. John Gould was without question the most prolific natural history artist of the nineteenth century. He worked during a period of intense fascination with discoveries in natural history, especially regarding knowledge of the wildlife of exotic lands. Gould shared the romantic enthusiasm of his time for such subjects, as well as the popular impulse to catalog exotic wildlife. He combined his passion for natural history with outstanding scientific, artistic, and entrepreneurial talents. Drawing on these abilities, he embarked on a series of projects that would eventually make him the leading publisher of ornithological illustrations in Victorian Britain. Gould’s unparalleled career spanned five decades, and he produced a monumental series of books of birds throughout the world. Gould planned the Birds of Europe in an effort to redress the imbalance between the study of local and foreign ornithology. In his preface he stated his mission: “the Birds of Europe, in which we are, or ought to be, most interested, have not received that degree of attention which they naturally demand. The present work has been undertaken to supply that deficiency.” Gould portrayed birds native to Europe in a manner that had only been thought appropriate for the colorful species of distant places. In this way he managed to draw much popular interest back to native birds, which were suddenly considered equally beautiful to exotic species. Rich, vibrant color is an important attribute of the best 19th Century prints. Many prints by John Gould found on the market today have modern color that affects both the appearance and the value of these great works. John Gould died in 1881 still actively illustrating and producing fine bird books. His stock of unsold copies, unbound text and plates in various states, lithographic stones, drawings and paintings, amounted to nearly three tons. Many of the uncolored pulls from his monumental "Birds of Europe" have been recolored in the last thirty years, and these are often found on the market. Fortunately, the difference between original and modern color can be discerned by looking carefully at the print. When modern color is applied to 180 year old paper, the application is inconsistent; the cellulose of the aged paper has begun to breakdown and can no longer evenly absorb the watercolors, resulting in a splotchy uneven appearance All of the Gould bird prints in Arader Galleries' inventory have exquisite original color. The vastly superior quality of original color can be clearly differentiated from new color by its smooth and even appearance. The inks have noticeably deeper, richer tones. The difference can also be seen in the lovely surface "sheen" that results from the application of gum arabic when the lithograph was first pulled. The hand coloring of engravings and lithographs reached its zenith in the 19th Century. Works that still display their original color are more rewarding to view, and will better hold their value in the years to come.

      [Bookseller: Arader Galleries San Francisco]
 7.   Check availability:     AbeBooks     Link/Print  


        Baillon's Crake

      London 1832 - John Gould (1804-1881) A selection from Birds of Europe published in London 1832-37. Lithograph with original hand-coloring measuring 14 ½” x 21 ½” accompanied by corresponding natural history description written by John Gould. Condition: Very good. John Gould was without question the most prolific natural history artist of the nineteenth century. He worked during a period of intense fascination with discoveries in natural history, especially regarding knowledge of the wildlife of exotic lands. Gould shared the romantic enthusiasm of his time for such subjects, as well as the popular impulse to catalogue exotic wildlife. He combined his passion for natural history with outstanding scientific, artistic, and entrepreneurial talents. Drawing on these abilities, he embarked on a series of projects that would eventually make him the leading publisher of ornithological illustrations in Victorian Britain. Gould’s unparalleled career spanned five decades, and he produced a monumental series of books of birds throughout the world. Gould planned the Birds of Europe in an effort to redress the imbalance between the study of local and foreign ornithology. In his preface he stated his mission: “the Birds of Europe, in which we are, or ought to be, most interested, have not received that degree of attention which they naturally demand. The present work has been undertaken to supply that deficiency.” Gould portrayed birds native to Europe in a manner that had only been thought appropriate for the colorful species of distant places. In this way he managed to draw much popular interest back to native birds, which were suddenly considered equally beautiful to exotic species. Rich, vibrant color is an important attribute of the best 19th Century prints. Many prints by John Gould found on the market today have modern color that affects both the appearance and the value of these great works. John Gould died in 1881 still actively illustrating and producing fine bird books. His stock of unsold copies, unbound text and plates in various states, lithographic stones, drawings and paintings, amounted to nearly three tons. Many of the uncolored pulls from his monumental "Birds of Europe" have been recolored in the last thirty years, and these are often found on the market. Fortunately, the difference between original and modern color can be discerned by looking carefully at the print. When modern color is applied to 180 year old paper, the application is inconsistent; the cellulose of the aged paper has begun to breakdown and can no longer evenly absorb the watercolors, resulting in a splotchy uneven appearance All of the Gould bird prints in Arader Galleries' inventory have exquisite original color. The vastly superior quality of original color can be clearly differentiated from new color by its smooth and even appearance. The inks have noticeably deeper, richer tones. The difference can also be seen in the lovely surface "sheen" that results from the application of gum arabic when the lithograph was first pulled. The hand coloring of engravings and lithographs reached its zenith in the 19th Century. Works that still display their original color are more rewarding to view, and will better hold their value in the years to come.

      [Bookseller: Arader Galleries San Francisco]
 8.   Check availability:     AbeBooks     Link/Print  


        Hooded Merganser. Mergus Cucullatus

      London 1832 - John Gould (1804-1881). A selection from Gould's Birds of Europe, published in London 1832-1837, printed by C. Hullmandel. Lithograph with original hand-coloring measuring 14 ½” x 21 ½”. Condition: Very good. John Gould was without question the most prolific natural history artist of the nineteenth century. He worked during a period of intense fascination with discoveries in natural history, especially regarding knowledge of the wildlife of exotic lands. Gould shared the romantic enthusiasm of his time for such subjects, as well as the popular impulse to catalogue exotic wildlife. He combined his passion for natural history with outstanding scientific, artistic, and entrepreneurial talents. Drawing on these abilities, he embarked on a series of projects that would eventually make him the leading publisher of ornithological illustrations in Victorian Britain. The preparatory drawings that he produced were passed on for completion to skilled illustrators, most notably his wife, Elizabeth, and Edward Lear. The plates which resulted from such partnerships were a splendid fusion of art and science, with a scope that remains unsurpassed. Stunning and at the same time highly accurate, Gould's illustrations linked beauty to science, and science to beauty, in and an unprecedented manner. Gould’s unparalleled career spanned five decades, and he produced a monumental series of books of birds throughout the world. Gould planned the Birds of Europe in an effort to redress the imbalance between the study of local and foreign ornithology. In his preface he stated his mission: “the Birds of Europe, in which we are, or ought to be, most interested, have not received that degree of attention which they naturally demand. The present work has been undertaken to supply that deficiency.” Gould portrayed birds native to Europe in a manner that had only been thought appropriate for the colorful species of distant places. In this way he managed to draw much popular interest back to native birds, which were suddenly considered equally beautiful to exotic species. Rich, vibrant color is an important attribute of the best 19th Century prints. Many prints by John Gould found on the market today have modern color that affects both the appearance and the value of these great works. John Gould died in 1881 still actively illustrating and producing fine bird books. His stock of unsold copies, unbound text and plates in various states, lithographic stones, drawings and paintings, amounted to nearly three tons. Many of the uncolored pulls from his monumental "Birds of Europe" have been re-colored in the last thirty years, and these are often found on the market. Fortunately, the difference between original and modern color can be discerned by looking carefully at the print. When modern color is applied to 180 year old paper, the application is inconsistent; the cellulose of the aged paper has begun to breakdown and can no longer evenly absorb the watercolors, resulting in a splotchy uneven appearance All of the Gould bird prints in Arader Galleries' inventory have exquisite original color. The vastly superior quality of original color can be clearly differentiated from new color by its smooth and even appearance. The inks have noticeably deeper, richer tones. The difference can also be seen in the lovely surface "sheen" that results from the application of gum arabic when the lithograph was first pulled. The hand coloring of engravings and lithographs reached its zenith in the 19th Century. Works that still display their original color are more rewarding to view, and will better hold their value in the years to come.

      [Bookseller: Arader Galleries San Francisco]
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        Contes Bruns

      Canel & Guyot, Paris 1832 - par une [tête à l?envers]. In-8 de (2) ff., 398 pp. : demi-maroquin à coins, dos à nerfs, non rogné, tête dorée. Édition originale parue sous le voile de l?anonymat. Titre orné d?une vignette gravée d?après Johannot. Balzac ne tarda pas à révéler la paternité des contes peu après la parution du recueil, dans La Caricature du 16 février 1832: «Ils étaient trois, avec de l?esprit comme quatre; trois anonymes qui avaient nom Chasles, Balzac et Rabou.». Deux des 10 contes émanent de la plume de Balzac et paraissent ici pour la première fois: Une Conversation entre onze heures et minuit, figurera sous le titre La Grande Bretèche dans le tome III des Scènes de la vie de province. Un grand d?Espagne réapparaîtra dans La Muse du département. Bel exemplaire. Carteret, I, 181: «Ouvrage rare».

      [Bookseller: Librairie Benoît Forgeot]
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        An Historical Sketch of the Origin and Progress of Gas-Lighting

      Simpkin and Marshall, London 1832 - Hardback, 110mm x 180mm tall (4.5" x 7.25" approx.). Pp x, 440, with vignette illustration to title-page. Signature of an early owner, one James H. Wilton, to front free endpaper, and that of one N.H. Bradley, Oct 18th 1879 with a note of the book's December 1913 re-binding, to the upper blank margin of the titlepage. Front free endpaper browned and some foxing throughout, but not heavy, otherwise very good and tight in a binding of full black morocco, with gilt rulings to boards and five raised bands to spine/gilt spine title & date; four gilt symbols to spine panels/top edges gilt & marbled endpapers. Photograph/s and or insured postal quote provided on request. [Attributes: First Edition]

      [Bookseller: Hale Books]
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        EL INGENIOSO HIDALGO DON QUIJOTE DE LA MANCHA. 4 Tomos

      - Madrid. Imp. que fue de Fuentenebro. Mayo de 1832. 14x9 cm. T. I, portadilla+1 lám. de Cervantes+portada+LIV + 356 págs. + 3 láms. * T. II, portadilla+portada+469 págs.+3 láms. * T. III, portadilla+portada+460 págs.+3 láms. * T. IV, portadilla+portada+450 págs.+3 láms. plena piel época, cortes tintados, exlibris anterior propietario, uno de los excelentes grabados corto de margen inferior afectado a la leyenda, algunas marcas de agua sin afectar. El editor advierte que se ha copiado de la edición de la Real Imprenta del año 1797, y con las mismas 48 estampas, esto no fue así, solo compuso 12 y el retrato de Cervantes, que es lo que ofertamos. Contiene Noticia de la vida y de las obras de Cervantes. [Attributes: Hard Cover]

      [Bookseller: Librería Torreón de Rueda]
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        Übergabevertrag zwischen Thomas Windsor (Schiffskommandant in der Royal Navy; Cardiff 1752 - 1832 Knightsbridge) und Ellen Frances Oldham (London 1787 - ?) das Woodside Lodge betreffend. Dated 4th Octd. 1832. 14 (davon 9 beidseitig) handgeschriebene Pergament-Blätter und 1 handgezeichneten Plan auf Pergament. Mit zusammen 22 (teils doppelten) eigenhändigen Unterschriften. Mit 11 roten Lacksiegeln, teils geprägt 'W'. 61 x 69 cm. Gefaltet.,

      1832 - Der handgezeichnete Plan bezeichnet: 'Plan of Woodside Lodge in the Parish of Amersham in the counties of Buckingham & Hertford'.- Amersham liegt im Nordwesten von London in Buckingham. Woodside war ein Grundstück auf dem Anwesen von Thomas Tyrwhitt-Drake in diesem Ort, das bereits mehrere Besitzer (u.a. Oliver Cromwells Ehefrau und Töchter) und wohl auch Namen hatte.- Diese Abtretung, Übertragung und Vertrag zur Übergabe (auch Nachlass der Woodside Lodge) wurde geschlossen zwischen Thomas Windsor of Gore House Kensington und Ellen Frances Oldham und deren Treuhändern, weitere Namen wie Henry Windsor (der 8. Earl of Plymouth), Reverend Henry Townsend, John Thomas Miller und Thomas Walker of Furnivals Inn, London, werden genannt und unterzeichneten (als Zeugen) den Vertrag. Die jeweils verso beschriebenen Blätter dokumentierten gleichzeitig die Bestätigung der Abtretung.- Belegt zugleich die Besitzverhältnisse des Grundstücks ab 1755.- Die Blätter mit zusammen 22 geprägten 1-Pfund-Marken und einer 12-Pfund-Marke. Die notariellen Kosten des Vertrages beliefen sich auf 5000 Pfund (!). Gewicht in Gramm: 500

      [Bookseller: Antiquariat Daniel Schramm e.K.]
 13.   Check availability:     AbeBooks     Link/Print  


        Herring Gull. Larus argentatus, (Brunn)

      London 1832 - John Gould (1804-1881) A selection from the Birds of Europe. Lithograph with original hand-coloring measuring 14 ½” x 21 ½”. Condition: Very good. John Gould was without question the most prolific natural history artist of the nineteenth century. He worked during a period of intense fascination with discoveries in natural history, especially regarding knowledge of the wildlife of exotic lands. Gould shared the romantic enthusiasm of his time for such subjects, as well as the popular impulse to catalogue exotic wildlife. He combined his passion for natural history with outstanding scientific, artistic, and entrepreneurial talents. Drawing on these abilities, he embarked on a series of projects that would eventually make him the leading publisher of ornithological illustrations in Victorian Britain. Gould’s unparalleled career spanned five decades, and he produced a monumental series of books of birds throughout the world. Gould planned the Birds of Europe in an effort to redress the imbalance between the study of local and foreign ornithology. In his preface he stated his mission: “the Birds of Europe, in which we are, or ought to be, most interested, have not received that degree of attention which they naturally demand. The present work has been undertaken to supply that deficiency.” Gould portrayed birds native to Europe in a manner that had only been thought appropriate for the colorful species of distant places. In this way he managed to draw much popular interest back to native birds, which were suddenly considered equally beautiful to exotic species. Rich, vibrant color is an important attribute of the best 19th Century prints. Many prints by John Gould found on the market today have modern color that affects both the appearance and the value of these great works. John Gould died in 1881 still actively illustrating and producing fine bird books. His stock of unsold copies, unbound text and plates in various states, lithographic stones, drawings and paintings, amounted to nearly three tons. Many of the uncolored pulls from his monumental "Birds of Europe" have been recolored in the last thirty years, and these are often found on the market. Fortunately, the difference between original and modern color can be discerned by looking carefully at the print. When modern color is applied to 180 year old paper, the application is inconsistent; the cellulose of the aged paper has begun to breakdown and can no longer evenly absorb the watercolors, resulting in a splotchy uneven appearance All of the Gould bird prints in Arader Galleries' inventory have exquisite original color. The vastly superior quality of original color can be clearly differentiated from new color by its smooth and even appearance. The inks have noticeably deeper, richer tones. The difference can also be seen in the lovely surface "sheen" that results from the application of gum arabic when the lithograph was first pulled. The hand coloring of engravings and lithographs reached its zenith in the 19th Century. Works that still display their original color are more rewarding to view, and will better hold their value in the years to come.

      [Bookseller: Arader Galleries San Francisco]
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        Geschichte des Kantons Schwyz. Von dessen ersten Gründung . bis zur gewaltingen Staatsumwälzung der löbl. Eidgenossenschaft 1798 herausgeben von einem Zögling und Verehrer des Verfassers (Caspar Rigert, Pfarrer in Gersau). 5 Bde.

      Schwyz, Jos. Kälin u. Comp., 1832-38 - 8°, je ca 400 S., insgesamt 26 lithogr. Tafeln und 1 gef. Karte., Kart d. Zeit m. Rückenschild, Etwas stockfleckig, insgesamt schönes Exemplar. Erste Ausgabe. Lonchamp 1021. Feller/Bonjour 592ff. Bd.: 1: Von dessen ersten Gründung bis zur Sempacher Schlacht; 2: Von der Sempacher Schlacht bis und mit dem Frieden vom Jahre 1450; 3: Vom Frieden mit Zürich und vom Schwabenkrieg bis zur Reformation; 4: Vom Anfang der Reformation in der Eidgenossenschaft bis zur Stiftung des goldenen Bundes; 5: Von Schliessung des goldenen Bundes 1586 bis zur gewaltigen Staatsumwälzung der löbl. Eidgenossenschaft 1798. Joseph Thomas Fassbind (1755?1824) lebte in Schwyz, studiert in Einsiedeln, Bellinzona, Como und Besançon. 1798 wurde er wegen seines Widerstands gegen den helvetischen Bürgereid des Landesverrats für schuldig befunden und zu zwölf Jahren Exil im Kloster Engelberg verurteilt. Die von ihm zwischen 1791 und 1803 verfasste «Schwyzer Geschichte» ist der erste Versuch, alle «wissenswerten und merkwürdigen Ereignisse» der Region festzuhalten. Sie beginnt mit der Frage nach der Herkunft der Schwyzer und endet im dritten Band mit einer detaillierten Darstellung der Kämpfe gegen die Franzosen 1798. Fassbind beschreibt nicht nur die politische Geschichte, sondern auch demographische, soziale und ökonomische Eigenheiten des Alten Landes Schwyz.Die von Pfarrer Kaspar Rigert 1832 im Namen von Fassbind veröffentlichte fünfbändige Geschichte wurde vom Herausgeber zu stark verändert, um noch als Fassbinds «Schwyzer Geschichte» gelten zu können. 2600 gr. [Attributes: First Edition; Soft Cover]

      [Bookseller: antiquariat peter petrej]
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        PROYECTO Y MEMORIA DE. SOBRE LA CONDUCCION DE AGUAS A MADRID, mandado imprimir con aprobacion de S.M. por el Excelentísimo Ayuntamiento de esta M. I. Villa.

      Imprenta Real, Madrid 1832 - 31'5x21, 3h (incluída port. con escudo grab.), 103p, 2 grandes láms. despl. Plena piel, tejuelo y dorados en lomo. - Se incluyen dos folios impresos por las dos caras sobre la traida de aguas a Madrid fechadas en 8 de Julio de 1851. 1832

      [Bookseller: Escalinata, librería]
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        CARY'S NEW MAP OF ENGLAND AND WALES with part of Scotland . Cross Roads, Rivers, . Canals

      Cary 2nd edition corrected to 1832, London - Hand coloured maps on 81 leaves incl. General map, dedication, explanations, & distance gauge by Cary Quarto half calf (covers off & lacking spine/tips worn) 81 leaves + 102pp incl. adverts for Atlases. Slight edge dusting to a few leaves and some offsetting where opposite page is mainly sea. One opening has small ink spotting. All roads, boundaries and wooded areas colored. 1 volume.

      [Bookseller: Abbey Antiquarian Books]
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        Chinese repository1832.5-1851.1221Vol.s(Chinese Edition) ZHONG GUO CONG BAO ( 1832.51851.12 ) ( YING YIN BAN QUAN 21 CE )

      paperback. New. Ship out in 2 business day, And Fast shipping, Free Tracking number will be provided after the shipment.Language: English. Vol.1. List of Articles and Subject Index of Chinese repositoryVol.2. No. 1-12. from May. 1832. to April. 1833Vol.3. From May. 1833 to April 1834Vol.4. From May 1834. to April 1835Vol.5. From May 1835. to April 1836Vol.6. From May. 1836. to April. 1837Vol.7. From May 1837. to April 1838Vol.8. From May. 1838. to April. 1839Vol.10. From May. 1839. to April. 1840Vol.11. From January to December. 1841Vol.12. From January to December. 1842 Vol.13. From January to December. 1843V... Satisfaction guaranteed,or money back.

      [Bookseller: cninternationalseller]
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        The Works of Lord Byron: with his Letters and Journals, and his Life by Thomas Moore [in Seventeen Volumes]. COMPLETE AND EXTENDED SET IN ORIGINAL CLOTH

      John Murray -33 1832 - 17 vols., sm. 8vo., First Edition, with all half-titles (save vols I and. IX as usual), 17 engraved frontispieces (most original tissue guards present), engraved and printed titles in each volume, and a folding facsimile, frontispieces, guards and engraved titles mildly foxed, all text remarkably crisp and clean; original dark-green moiré cloth, gilt backs, uncut, patterned endpapers (save where rebacked), all bindings rubbed at extremities, backstrips chipped at heads and tails, four volumes neatlky rebacked with old backstrips laid down, cases of four volumes loose or shaken (but all text blocks entirely sound), one volume with short split in backstrip, generally a nice, notably clean set in publisher's original binding. All volumes have title blocked in gilt at head of backstrips (this is a very early example of gilt blocking directly onto cloth) and the gilt of every volume is uniformly bright and clear. The frontispieces and title-vignettes are by Finden after various artists. This edition was originally intended as fourteen volumes, as stated on the printed titles of the first twelve volumes. 'When this Edition was first announced.the printer calculated that the whole might be comprised in fourteen volumes. While, however, the Notices of Lord Byron's Life were for the second time passing through the press, it was suggested to the Publisher, that the time had come when the Public had a right to look for such notes and illustrations to Lord Byron's text, as are usually appended to the pages of a deceased author of established and permanent popularity. These additions will extend the Work to seventeen volumes; the last of which will [and does] include a very copious and careful Index to the whole collection.' (Advertisement, vol. XIII). AN ORIGINAL COPY AND NOT, AS SOMETIMES, A MADE-UP SET. Despite the broken cases, which are wholly forgivable given the fragility of the publisher's binding which was not intended to last, this set is in very good contemporary state and has considerable shelf presence. COMPLETE SETS OF THIS NOTABLE EDITION ARE VERY SCARCE, THE MORE SO IN THIS EXTENDED FORM. Coleridge, xlvi; CBEL III, 187(2a). [Attributes: Hard Cover]

      [Bookseller: Island Books [formerly of Devon]]
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        METAMORPHOSEON - libri XV, cum appositis ITALICO CARMINE. Interpretationibus ac noris, Florentiae, Apud Vincentum Batelli & Soc., 1832

      - 15 x 24-7.Editio secunda in 4 volumi. Rilegatura mz.pelle con dorsi restaurati e titolo e fregi in oro su tasselli ai dorsi, carte di sguardia sostituite, opera in buone condizioni, testi in italiano. Volume primo: pag. 434 con 45 tavole + 1 all'antiporta. Numerate 1-45. Manca la n. 12 ma la 39 è doppia. Volume secondo: pp. 583 con 20 tavole. Numerate 46-65 e sono tutte presenti. Volume terzo: pp. 564 con 13 tavole. Numerate 66-78 e sono tutte presenti. Volume quarto: pp. 407 con 11 tavole. Numerate 79-90 (manca la n. 86) Le tavole con splendide incisioni allegoriche, sono opera di Ademollo, Scotti, Tagliani, Rosaspina, Sasso A.G., Morghen, Martelli, Migliavacca (a richiesta possiamo inviare elenchi e dettagli) Buona edizione in quattro volumi.

      [Bookseller: Ferraguti service s.a.s. - Rivisteria]
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        RECHERCHES ARCHEOLOGIQUES POUR SERVIR D'INTRODUCTION A UN VOYAGE DANS LA SEINE-INFERIEURE ET DANS L'ARRONDISSEMENT DES ANDELYS / RECUEIL DE PIECES ACADEMIQUES EXTRAITES DU PRECIS ANALYTIQUE DES TRAVAUX DE L'ACADEMIE ROYALE DE ROUEN PENDANT L'ANNEE 1834 / ESSAI SUR LES SARCOPHAGES, LEUR ORIGINE ET LA DUREE DE LEUR USAGE / MEMOIRE SUR LES ANTIQUITES DE LA FORET ET DE LA PRESQU'ILE DE BROTONNE ET SUR LA VILLA DE MAULEVRIER PRES CAUDEBEC / DES VILLES ET VOIES ROMAINES EN BASSE-NORMANDIE ET DE LEUR COMMUNICATION AVEC LE MANS ET RENNES / VOYAGE ARCHEOLOGIQUE FAIT EN NORMANDIE EN 1836 PAR M. GALLY-KNIGHT / LETTRE SUR L'ARCHITECTURE DES EGLISES DU DEPARTEMENT DE LA MANCHE / MONUMENTS ROMAINS D'ALLEAUME / RECHERCHES SUR LES ILES DU COTENTIN EN GENER

      - Rouen + Caen + Valognes, Nicétas Periaux + A. Hardel + Carette-Bondessein + Henri Gomont Mme veuve H. Gomont + Mégard et Cie, 1832-1835-1837-1838-1843-1846-1848-1885. 14x22,5 cm. 12 petits fascicules brochés reliés en un fort volume. 13+54+45+96 (2 planches dépliantes) +93+153+28+19+45+16+38+ (5 planches dépliantes) +15 pages. Reliure de la fin du XIXème siècle en demi basane brune. Plats recouverts de papier moucheté vert. Dos à 5 faux nerfs peu prononcés, portant le titre "ARCHEOLOGIE NORMANDE" en lettres dorées. Brochures d'origine conservées. Traces d'usage sur la reliure et quelques rousseurs éparses à l'intérieur, cependant ouvrage solide et d'un grand intérêt pour l'histoire régionale. [Attributes: Soft Cover]

      [Bookseller: Librairie de l'Univers]
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        A Map of the County Palatine of Chester Divided into Hundreds & Parishes, From an Accurate Survey, Made in the Years 1828 & 1829. By W. Swire & W. F. Hutchings, London.

      Published by Henry Tessdale & Co. 302, High Holborn, August 1st, 1832., London, - Hutchings' large-scale map of Cheshire 990 by 1330mm (39 by 52.25 inches). Large engraved map, dissected and mounted on linen, fine original full-wash colour, south west view of Chester cathedral, lower right, edged in green silk, lower left silk edging missing, housed in original tree calf pull-off slipcase, spine ruled in gilt, red morocco label lettered in gilt to spine, rubbed. Uncommon. A fine example in full original wash colour. The large calligraphic title at the upper right surmounts the 'Scale of Miles' and vignette view of the Customs House in Liverpool. A table of explanation towards the bottom left outlines a wealth of topographical detail, including ichnographic representations of the principal towns, villages, churches, gentleman's seats, commons, heaths and hills, parish and other boundaries, canals, wind and water-mills, roads, lanes, toll-bars and rivers.

      [Bookseller: Daniel Crouch Rare Books LLP]
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        Analyse des transversales appliqué à la recherche des propriétés projectives de lignes et surfaces géometriques. Pour faire suite aux mémoires sur les centres de moyennes harmoniques et la théorie générale des polaires réciproques. Lu à l\'Académie Royale des Sciences de l\'Institut de France, le lundi, 5. septbr. 1830

      Berlin: Verlag Georg Reimer, 1832. First Edition. Quarter morocco. Very good. First Edition. Quarter morocco. 4to (260 × 210 mm), pp. [2], 122; text slightly toned with occasional light spotting, especially at initial and final leaves; title-page toned with discrete repair to the head of hinge; ink inscription from Poncelet to Siméon Denis Poisson; very good in modern morocco-backed marbled boards, slightly rubbed, new (marbled) endpapers.

      [Bookseller: Abel Rare Books Ltd.]
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        Westmorland, Cumberland, Durham & Northumberland Illustrated.

      Fisher. Son & Co., London. 1832 - 220pp + 215 plates (on 108 leaves) as called for. 'G B Dalby, for a remembrance of many happy days amongst the scenes here delineated, August 7 1868' written on first blank. Foxing/browning to some plates, but many clean and crisp. Very good hardback in slightly rubbed, contemporary, half morocco with marbled boards and eps. Aeg. [Attributes: First Edition; Hard Cover]

      [Bookseller: Elaine Beardsell (ABA,PBFA )]
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        Andrew Jackson Disdains Rewarding One Of His Political Enemies

      - ÒHe appears to have some interest of feeling in this case for his Georgia friends and particularly as it is given.to such an open undisguised tra- ducer of the administration as he says Mr. Longstreet is.Ó Jackson believed that changing officeholders would prevent the development of a corrupt bureaucracy. He implemented the theory of ro- tation in office, declaring it Òa leading principle in the republican creed.Ó In practice, this fine theory involved rewarding JacksonÕs support- ers and fellow party members with government posts, as a way to strengthen party loyalty. This system of firing opponents and filling their places with party loyalists came to be known as the Òspoils system,Ó and Jackson received the reputation of being its initiator. During JacksonÕs first term, there was a high tariff on imports of manufactured goods made in Europe. This made those goods more expensive than ones from the northern U.S., raising the prices paid by planters in the South. Southern politicians argued that high tariffs benefited northern industrialists at the expense of southern farmers. South Carolina went so far as to claim the right to ÒnullifyÓÑdeclare voidÑthe tariff legislation, and more generally the right of a state to nullify any Federal laws which went against its interests. Although Jackson sympathized with the South in the tariff debate, he supported a strong union with effec- tive powers for the central government and violently opposed nullification. He vowed to send troops to South Carolina to enforce the laws, and in December 1832 issued a resounding proclamation against the Ònullifiers,Ó stating that he considered Òthe power to annul a law of the United States, assumed by one state, incompatible with the existence of the Union.Ó South Carolina, and by ex- tension all nullifiers, the President declared, stood on Òthe brink of insurrection and treason. In 1833, Congress passed a Òforce billÓ which authorized Jackson to use violence to preserve the Union. Augustus Baldwin Longstreet was the publisher of the Augusta (Georgia) States Rights Sentinel, a newspaper that advocated nullification in the recent crisis and thus opposed JacksonÕs policies. The year after this letter, he would publish what is considered the SouthÕs first important literary work, ÒGeorgia Scenes, Characters, Incidents, Etc. in the First Half Century.Ó His brother Gilbert shared his politics. These Longstreet brothers were uncles of Confederate General James Longstreet - LeeÕs famed Òwar horse.Ó Gilbert owned rights to the Augusta- Savannah mail route and there were complaints that under his aegis, the mails were not delivered often enough. The Georgia congressional delegation brought these to the PresidentÕs attention. Perhaps spoils politics was also on JacksonÕs mind when he wrote the following letter, which was ostensibly about bidding and the granting of other Georgia postal routes. The William Barry mentioned was JacksonÕs Postmaster General. John Forsythe, his Secretary of State, was a Georgian who, when South Carolina nullified the federal tariff in 1832 and asked Georgia to follow persuaded his fellow Georgians to support Jackson instead of its neighbor. Autograph Letter Signed, Washington, November 8, 1834, to Charles K. Gard- ner, acting postmaster responsible for postal appointments, criticizing the selec- tion of political foe (and possibly inept) Longstreet for a government contract instead of one of the PresidentÕs supporters. ÒI am this moment advised that there is great complaint of unfairness in the letting of the route in Georgia - from Augusta to Savannah. The complaints came to me through a high source and is well calculated to do the Department an injury, as it would seem to throw a suspicion that it was done to the injury of our friends, to favor Mr. Longstreet a bitter enemy and constant reviler of the administration. It is stated that Mr. Reesides proposed to carry the mail for $10,000 per annum to run the one half the time on the [Attributes: Signed Copy]

      [Bookseller: The Raab Collection]
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        Afbeelding der Artsenij-Gewassen, welke in de Nederlandsche Apotheek als zoodanige vermeld zijn. Naar de beste Uitlandsche Afbeeldingen geteekend en op steen gebragt.

      - Leyden, Du Mortier en Zoon, 1832-1838. 4 volumes bound in two. Folio (340 x 240mm). With 265 fine handcoloured lithographed plates. Contemporary half cloth. One of the first scientific works with lithographed plates published in the Netherlands. The fine plates are after drawings by the author. Only 116 copies were subscribed and probably 130 copies were printed. It was issued in 53 parts and published over a period of 5 years. The publishing history of the work is complex. The first 5 plates were printed by Van Sander and Co. and published by J.C. Sepp and Son. Sepp discontinued the publication which was taken over by Mortier. Mortier issued the first 5 plates again. For this reason copies are sometimes found with 5 extra plates, and hence most bibliographies quote the wrong number of plates. Landwehr gives 266 plates, which is incorrect as plate 232 was never published. In the lists of plates in volume IV plate 232 is not listed. A fine and clean copy.Landwehr 6; Nissen BBI, 39. [Attributes: Hard Cover]

      [Bookseller: Antiquariaat Junk]
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        Poésies De Marie De France, Poète Anglo-Normand Du XIIIe Siècle, Ou Recueil De Lais, Fables et Autres Productions De Cette Femme Célèbre (2 tomes)

      Chez Marescq, Paris 1832 - Deux volumes en reliure d'époque, demi veau glacé havane, dos à nerfs pièces de titres et tomaisons rouges et vertes, date en queue, plats marbrés jaunes. Frontispice gravé par Godefroy d'après Chasselat en début de chaque volume, dédicace en tome1, 581p, 504p. Paris, Imprimerie de Decourchant, rue d'Erfurt. Texte à grandes marges, non rogné.

      [Bookseller: Rossignol]
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        Trichoglossus Rubritorquis. Scarlet-collared Parrakeet

      London 1832 - Edward Lear (1812-1888) is fondly remembered for his books of nonsense and for popularizing the limerick, but he was also a prolific watercolorist, who as a young man earned his livelihood and achieved recognition as an illustrator of birds and animals. Born in the north London suburb of Holloway on 12 May 1812, he was the youngest of twenty-one children born to Jeremiah and Ann Lear. His childhood was one of outward prosperity but in 1825, his father, a stockbroker, was ruined by a financial crisis brought on by unfortunate speculation, and consigned to the debtor's prison. At the age of fifteen the young and somewhat sickly Edward had to start earning his own living drawing and assisting printsellers. In 1830, at the age of 18, Lear obtained permission to work as a draughtsman at the Zoological Society gardens, located at Regent’s Park. The following year he moved with his sister, Ann, to nearby lodgings in Albany Street, in order to be close to his work and during the course of the next two years devoted his time to recording the different members of the parrot family. He was encouraged in this task by N. A. Vigors, John Gould and Lord Stanley and between 1830 and 1832 “Illustrations of the Family Psittacidae, or Parrots” was published in parts. Lear’s publication was innovative in several significant ways. Unlike previous bird artists, he drew whenever possible from life rather than stuffed specimens, thus combining anatomical accuracy and subtlety of detail with the pose and expression of the living, moving bird. Lear also employed the relatively new medium of lithography which, by dispensing with the need for professional engravers, allowed him to retain complete artistic control over all stages of his work. This expertly hand-colored lithograph, Trichoglossus Rubritorquis. Scarlet-collared Parrakeet, measures 21" x 14.5" and is in good condition with light foxing and staining with lightly torn left edge. This parakeet is vibrantly colored and detailed, against the pencil-sketch-like background, making it the focal piece of this lithograph. The head and neck are colored in a deep blue, with an orange beak, throat and chest and brilliant green wings and legs. Precise lines define and detail each feather and characteristic of this magnificent bird.

      [Bookseller: Arader Galleries San Francisco]
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        Out Lines of Oryctology. An Introduction to The Study of Fossil Organic Remains: Especially Those Found in the British Strata

      London: M.A. Nattall and Leicester: Combe and Son, [c.1832]. . Third edition, “with the author’s latest corrections”. 8vo. viii, 350, (6) pp. Uncut in publisher’s dark green pebbled cloth, original paper spine label slightly chipped, the ownership inscription of one William Lowrey [?] to the title page and front pastedown, the latter also featuring a modern bookplate. 10 plates. A little staining to the plates, minor splits to the upper edges of the joints though they remain sound, a decent, unsophisticated copy.

      [Bookseller: Bow Windows Bookshop]
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        A Map of the County of Stafford Divided into Hundreds & Parishes, From an Accurate Survey, Made in the Years 1831 & 1832, By J. Phillips & W. J. Hutchings, London.

      Published by Henry Tessdale & Co. 302, High Holborn, August 1st, 1832., London, - Hutchings' large-scale map of Staffordshire 1370 by 990mm (54 by 39 inches). Large engraved map, dissected and mounted on linen, fine original full-wash colour, south east view of Lichfield cathedral, edged in green silk, housed in original tree calf pull-off slipcase, spine ruled in gilt, red morocco label lettered in gilt to spine, rubbed. Uncommon. A fine example in full original wash colour. The large calligraphic title at the upper right surmounts the 'Scale of Miles' and vignette view of the Customs House in Liverpool. A table of explanation towards the bottom left outlines a wealth of topographical detail, including ichnographic representations of the principal towns, villages, churches, gentleman's seats, commons, heaths and hills, parish and other boundaries, canals, wind and water-mills, roads, lanes, toll-bars and rivers.

      [Bookseller: Daniel Crouch Rare Books LLP]
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        Quadro in musaico scoperto in Pompei a di 24 Ottobre 1831.

      Naples, Stamperia Reale, 1832. - 4to. (2), 91, (1), XXIV pp. With 11 (1 coloured, 2 folding) engr. plates and 2 colour specimens in the text. Contemp. half calf with original wrapper cover mounted. First edition of the first scholarly description of the Alexander Mosaic discovered in the House of the Faun in Pompeii in fall 1831. - Slightl browning; top right corner shows small Vesuvian burn stain throughout (not touching text). From the library of Duke Max in Bavaria (1808-88), father of Empress Elisabeth of Austria. Borroni 7504. [Attributes: First Edition]

      [Bookseller: Antiquariat INLIBRIS Gilhofer Nfg. GmbH]
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        Pitture al fresco del Camposanto di Pisa.

      Dante,, Florenz, 1832 - Florenz, Dante, 1832. Gr.-folio. (4), 41, (2) S. Mit 1 gest. Frontisp., 1 kl. Titelvignette und 44 (von 46) gest. Tafeln und 1 gest. Textillustr. Pergamentband des 20. Jahrunderts. Brunet III, 862. - Thieme/Becker 22, 404 u. 29, 65 (für Rossi). - Neuausgabe mit neu gestochenen Tafeln der von Giovanni Lasinios Vater Carlo Lasinio erstmals 1810 unter demselben Titel herausgegebenen und gestochenen Folge von Kupfertafeln mit denselben Sujets. Neben dem schiefen Turm, zwei Kompositionen des Friedhofs und des Doms diverse Wandgemälde des "Camposanto" von Pisa. - Es fehlen die Tafeln 28 u. 29. - Mit grösserem durchgehendem Fleck im oberen Falz. Die letzten sieben Tafeln stärker fleckig. Der Pergamentband verzogen und fleckig. Pergamentband des 20. Jahrunderts.

      [Bookseller: EOS Buchantiquariat Benz]
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        L'America Storica, Fisica E Politica Nel 1825. Continente Meridionale Continente Settentrionale

      Milan 1832 - Size : 330x482 (mm), 13x19 (Inches), Original Hand Coloring

      [Bookseller: Alexandre Antique Prints, Maps & Books]
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        Arctic Oil Works. San Francisco, Cal.

      San Francisco - Edward Bosqui (1832 -1917) “Arctic Oil Works. San Francisco, Cal.” San Francisco, Bosqui Eng. & Print Co. Hand-colored lithograph 35” x 43” framed San Francisco was the biggest whaling port in the world during the late 19th century. This view depicts the Arctic Oil Works plant in the Potrero Hill waterfront area (Illinois and 16th St.) of San Francisco. The Artic Oils Works port complex and California Street offices were built and established in 1884. Boats traveling from the Arctic would transport whale and seal oils to the Arctic Oil Works refining plant in San Francisco to make soap and other products derived from whale oil. They also processed baleen (whales teeth) by drying it, then cutting it into stays for corsets, umbrellas and buggy whips. Their huge tanks for storing whale oil and connection to the railroad were state-of-the-art in 1884. The site was eventually replaced by Union Oil's petroleum depot by the turn of the 1900s. Edward Bosqui was born in Montreal, Canada on July 23, 1832. Bosqui came to San Francisco during the Gold Rush era in 1850 and found employment with a banking firm. In 1863 he established the Bosqui Engraving & Printing Company which produced lithographs and bookbinding. A friend of many of the local artists, Bosqui was one of the organizers of the San Francisco Art Association (1871) and the Bohemian Club (1872). His Marin County home burned in 1897, taking with it his large collection of paintings by local artists as well as his own, and in 1906, the fires following the great earthquake destroyed his printing firm. He was inactive in business until his death on Dec. 8, 1917 at his home in San Francisco.

      [Bookseller: Arader Galleries San Francisco]
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        Élémens de musique théoretique et pratique, suivant les principes de M. Rameau. Nouvelle édition. Lyon, Bryset 1762. 8°. 2 Bll., XXXVI, 236 S., 2 Bll., mit 10 gest. Notentafeln, Ldr. d. Zt. mit Rtitel u. reicher Rvergold.

      - DG 3,977 - MGG I, 310 - Eitner I, 103 - Wolffheim I, 450 - Dritte revidierte Ausgabe des wichtigen Werkes, das Dank seiner Klarheit den Theorien Rameaus eine viel größere Resonanz verschaffte, als Rameau selbst sie hatte erzielen können.- Mit Büchermarke u. eigenh. Kaufvermerk des Geigers (Gewandhausorchester) und Musikwissenschaftlers Wilhelm Langhans (1832-1892) und Stempel des Volksliedforschers Werner Danckert auf dem Vorsatz.- Leicht gebräunt, die Notentafeln tls. mit kl. Randläsuren, Ebd. etw. berieben, Rücken unterlegt.# Third revised edition of one of the most important books on music theory to be published in the 18th century.- Slightly browned, some plates with small marginal defects, binding slightly rubbed, overall decent copy. [Attributes: Signed Copy]

      [Bookseller: Antiquariat Müller]
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        Four Autograph Signed Letters to William Wetmore from His Business Partners Regarding Market Conditions and Wetmore's Business Affairs in South America and New York].

      - Valparaiso, Cadiz and New York, 1832-1837. Four autograph signed letters, all Quartos (ca. 27x20 cm or slightly smaller). In all 10 pp. of text. Brown ink on folded, all addressed, stamped and docketed on the last blank pages. Fold marks, minor holes on three letters after opening, in one case slightly affecting the text, otherwise a very good collection. Four interesting letters addressed to noted American merchant William Shepard Wetmore, concerning his business dealings and market conditions in South America and New York. Two letters are written by his business partners in Chile "Alsop and Co" (Valparaiso, 25 April and 29 November 1832); one - by a Cadiz merchant A. Burton "on the instruction of Mr. John Cryder," another partner of Wetmore (12 February 1833), and one - by a New York merchant Thomas P. Bucklin. The letters discuss various matters of Wetmore's trade, including arrival and departure of ships with his cargo, market fluctuations, business climate, quarantines, latest deals etc. The correspondents relate to a number of goods and articles which Wetmore traded with, including silk, copper, mercury (in other letters - quicksilver); the market conditions are reported about flour, sugars, various textiles (shirtings, cotton, silk etc.), tea, soap, gun powder, rice and others. Overall a nice collection of informative business letters regarding the dealings of an important American merchant. William Shepard Wetmore entered the mercantile business at the age of 14, as an employee of Edward Carrington & Co. of Providence, Rhode Island. In the 1820s he conducted active trade with the United States, England and South America, in partnership with Valparaiso import merchant Richard Alsop. In 1825 they were joined by Philadelphia native John Cryder. Four years later Wetmore retired and returned to the United States with a large fortune. In 1833-1839 he ran a successful business in Canton, as Wetmore & Co., trading in Chinese tea, silk, opium and other goods. His partners were Samuel Archer and John Cryder. In the 1840s Wetmore worked in New Your, having established a commission merchant firm of Wetmore, Cryder & Co. He retired in 1847 and permanently lived in his famous mansion Chateau-sur-Mer, the first of the Gilded Age mansions in Newport, Rhode Island.

      [Bookseller: The Wayfarer's Bookshop, ABAC/ILAB/PBFA]
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        Iceland Gull. Larus icelandicus, (Edmonston)

      London 1832 - John Gould (1804-1881) A selection from the Birds of Europe. Lithograph with original hand-coloring measuring 14 ½” x 21 ½”. Condition: Very good. John Gould was without question the most prolific natural history artist of the nineteenth century. He worked during a period of intense fascination with discoveries in natural history, especially regarding knowledge of the wildlife of exotic lands. Gould shared the romantic enthusiasm of his time for such subjects, as well as the popular impulse to catalogue exotic wildlife. He combined his passion for natural history with outstanding scientific, artistic, and entrepreneurial talents. Drawing on these abilities, he embarked on a series of projects that would eventually make him the leading publisher of ornithological illustrations in Victorian Britain. Gould’s unparalleled career spanned five decades, and he produced a monumental series of books of birds throughout the world. Gould planned the Birds of Europe in an effort to redress the imbalance between the study of local and foreign ornithology. In his preface he stated his mission: “the Birds of Europe, in which we are, or ought to be, most interested, have not received that degree of attention which they naturally demand. The present work has been undertaken to supply that deficiency.” Gould portrayed birds native to Europe in a manner that had only been thought appropriate for the colorful species of distant places. In this way he managed to draw much popular interest back to native birds, which were suddenly considered equally beautiful to exotic species. Rich, vibrant color is an important attribute of the best 19th Century prints. Many prints by John Gould found on the market today have modern color that affects both the appearance and the value of these great works. John Gould died in 1881 still actively illustrating and producing fine bird books. His stock of unsold copies, unbound text and plates in various states, lithographic stones, drawings and paintings, amounted to nearly three tons. Many of the uncolored pulls from his monumental "Birds of Europe" have been recolored in the last thirty years, and these are often found on the market. Fortunately, the difference between original and modern color can be discerned by looking carefully at the print. When modern color is applied to 180 year old paper, the application is inconsistent; the cellulose of the aged paper has begun to breakdown and can no longer evenly absorb the watercolors, resulting in a splotchy uneven appearance All of the Gould bird prints in Arader Galleries' inventory have exquisite original color. The vastly superior quality of original color can be clearly differentiated from new color by its smooth and even appearance. The inks have noticeably deeper, richer tones. The difference can also be seen in the lovely surface "sheen" that results from the application of gum arabic when the lithograph was first pulled. The hand coloring of engravings and lithographs reached its zenith in the 19th Century. Works that still display their original color are more rewarding to view, and will better hold their value in the years to come.

      [Bookseller: Arader Galleries San Francisco]
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        Tales and NovelsÉ

      New-York: Printed and published by J. & J. Harper, 1832-4. - Maria Edgeworth's tales for children and education theories were very popular in America as well as Britain and Ireland. Twenty volumes, bound in ten, twelvemo. With engraved titles and frontispieces. Contemporary half black calf over marbled boards, gilt spines. Fore-edge of back cover of the first volume rather worn, minor wear to boards otherwise. Light foxing throughout, as usual. A good, attractive set. Harper's Stereotype Edition, possibly the second American edition. Slade lists American editions published in 1822-5 and 1835-6. See Slade 29c. [Attributes: Hard Cover]

      [Bookseller: Michael R. Thompson Books, A.B.A.A.]
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        Barcelonne (Barcelona)

      Paris 1832 - A selection from Vues des cotes de France et dans la Mediterranee. Hand-colored aquatint engraving. Sheet size: 17 x 23 5/8". Inventory#: p188pmat.

      [Bookseller: Arader Galleries of Philadelphia, PA]
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        Botanical Watercolor for Tropical, Chiefly South American Plants

      1832 - Charles Empson Tropical, Chiefly South American Plants c. 1832 Original watercolors on paper Paper size: 15 1/2” x 10 1/4” Framed size: 26 1/2” x 20 1/2” Only recently discovered, Charles Empson’s original drawings of the exotic plants of South America introduce an artist of superb technique and achievement previously known only through the narratives of his travel in South America. Pursuing his fascination with the South American continent, Empson left England in 1830 to fulfill his “finely-cherished wish” to see for himself the curiosities and beauties of South America. His peregrinations took him from Cienega on the northern coast of Colombia through the central and eastern cordilleras of the Andes to Honda in the south, via the river Magdalena, and east into Venezuela. His recollections of the trip are preserved in his Narratives of South America, published in London in 1836. This volume also contains several engravings made from Empson’s notes and sketches and an appendix in which Epson listed many of the plants that excited his interest. Some of these are preserved in this sketchbook. Almost the entire collection of notes and sketches Empson made while in South America was destroyed in a shipwreck, depriving Empson of most of the specimens and data he collected under the title Tropical, Chiefly South American Plants. This strikingly beautiful series of original watercolors are valuable, therefore, for both their artistic merit and their historical importance. Unusual for the quality of the drawing and their pristine state of preservation, Empson’s plants and flowers seem to glisten under the touch of the tropical sun. Unlike the botanical drawings of most of his contemporaries, Empson’s sketches are not at all stylized. His Morning Glories entwine a dry twig; the tendrils of the Passion Flower reach out to find something to clutch. Like the great French botanical artist Redoute, Empson captures the play of light across shiny leaves, the color changes from a crease of a turning in a leaf. Technically and aesthetically masterful, these watercolors by Charles Empson must be ranked among the most important nineteenth century botanical drawings ever discovered.

      [Bookseller: Arader Galleries San Francisco]
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        Esquisses pittoresques et déscriptives de la ville et des environs de Naples

      Napoli, 1832 - Tre volumi di cm. 29, pp. (8) iv, 63 (1); (2) 79 (1); (2) 60, 8. Con bel frontespizio generale figurato, tre frontespizi particolari e 80 tavole fuori testo, ciascuna protetta da velina. Il tutto in litografia a firma Gigante e Wenzel. Legatura coeva in piena percallina decorata, dorsi lisci con filetti e titoli in oro su doppi tasselli. Sguardie marmorizzate con ex libris nobiliari. Bruniture limitate ai margini di parte delle tavole del secondo volume, altrimenti esemplare assolutamente genuino, marginoso ed in ottimo stato di conservazione. Non comune raccolta completa di quest'opera che rappresenta uno dei gioielli della tipografia napoletana del tempo. Così suddivisa: prima parte: Chemin de Naples a Cumes; seconda parte: Vues de Naples et de ses principaux édifices; terza parte: Ruines d'Herculanum et de Pompèi.

      [Bookseller: Studio Bibliografico Benacense]
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        Andrew Jackson Denouncing South Carolina's Nullification Attempt

      New York 1832 - Broadside. Proclamation, By Andrew Jackson, President of the United States. New York: Marsh & Harrison, [1832]. Large broadside on silk, text in 5 columns, surrounded by an ornamental border. 19 x 26 in. 1p. Excerpt"Whereas, a Convention assembled in the State of South Carolina, have passed an Ordnance.I consider then the power to annul a law of the United States, assumed by one State, incompatible with the existence of the Union, contradicted expressly by the letter of the Constitution unauthorized by it's spirit, inconsistent with every principle on which it was founded, and destructive of the great object for which it was formed." Historical BackgroundThe Nullification crisis was a foreshadowing of the sectional divisions that ultimately brought on Civil War. Opposition to protective tariffs enacted by Congress in 1832 grew to such intensity, particularly in the South, that in November 1832, South Carolina adopted a Nullification Ordinance proclaiming the Federal tariffs void in that state as of February 1, 1833.Jackson's Proclamation, drafted by Secretary of State Edward Livingston but infused with the president's Federalist principles and unyielding resolve, denounced South Carolina's ordnance as treasonous, unconstitutional, and "incompatible with the existence of the Union."While Congress granted Jackson emergency powers to employ the Army and Navy if necessary, the crisis was narrowly averted. Before the Ordinance of Nullification went into effect, Congress enacted a Compromise Tariff in 1833 that was sponsored by Clay and acceptable to both Jackson and the South. South Carolina promptly rescinded the Ordinance of Nullification, but afterwards, Calhoun and others argued that their actions had been justified and were in accordance with the principles of the Constitution.The first broadsides of this Proclamation were printed on paper in Washington and followed by several additional printings on silk in such cities as New York, Boston, and Philadelphia. ConditionFraying and some loss to margins. Minor tears and abrasion to the text area.

      [Bookseller: Seth Kaller Inc.]
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