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Displayed below are some selected recent viaLibri matches for books published in 1832

        Slavery in Orange County Virginia. A rarely encountered ledger and separate receipt book documenting the sale of 37 slaves including at least 23 named individuals. Orange County was also home to James Madison at the time and he maintained approximately 100 slaves

      Woodlawn, Orange County, Virginia, 1832-1848. 6.5" x 8", 6" x 4.25". "Manuscript ledger, 70 leaves, 6.5"" x 8"", Orange County, Virginia, 1832-1835, bound in paper boards, being an account kept by Peter Scales (1790-1869) in his role as executor of the estate of Lucy Herndon Minor (1779-1832) of Woodlawn plantation in Orange County, Virginia. Spine worn off, front board and first few pages detached, expected toning and soiling, else very good condition overall. Offered together with the ledger's corresponding receipt book (or ""daybook"") 184 leaves, 6"" x 4.25"", [Orange County, Virginia], 1832-1848, bound in leather boards. Some warping to boards with a few spots of loss on leather, especially at corners, pages bear expected soiling, else very good condition overall. The ledger, meticulously-maintained with each page-spread numbered, details the settlement and liquidation of the estate of Lucy Herndon Minor, the widow of Dabney Minor (1779-1822) who built the plantation in the 1790s. The 1,100 acre plantation, called ""Woodlawn,"" included a large manor house, 600 acres of cultivated land, as well as extensive forests, fruit orchards and good supply of livestock (Enquirer, Richmond, Va., October 19, 1832, p. 4). Woodlawn, like most sizable Virginia plantations, was worked by slaves, and the present account book documents the appraisal and sale of at least thirty-seven individuals (valued close to $8,000) of which seventeen are named specifically including ""Edmund ,"" ""Warner,"" ""Wyatt,"" ""Dolly ,"" ""Lucy,"" ""Wm, Anthony,"" ""old Nanny,"" ""Martin ,"" ""Nelly,"" ""Ned ,"" ""Judy,"" ""Fanny,"" ""Esther,"" and ""Reynolds."" In once case ""George (a Slave)"" kept an account with Scales. George incurred a debt to ""P. Scales"" for $7.12 and ""D. Minor"" for $0.75 plus an additional 25¢ ""omitted"" totaling $8.12. The debt, which was noted in May 1834, was credited as paid in December 1833. On December 25, he was credited $5.12 by ""Farm Expenses"" and on the 27th ""By Corn"" worth $3. The credit page for the ""Estate of Mrs Lucy Minor deceased in a/c with P. Scales Ex of Mrs Lucy Minor deceased"" notes that on January 10, 1833 a total of 37 slaves were sold including ""15 Slaves divided Between 6 Legatees"" totaling $3,260 and ""22 Slaves divided between 3 Legatees"" worth $4,481. The accompanying receipt book (often referred to as a ""daybook"") details the transactions recorded in the ledger in chronological fashion. The receipts are accomplished in a variety of hands, some of which have been pasted down onto existing leaves. Most importantly, the daybook reveals more information on the identity of the slaves sold off by the Minor estate. For instance, on page 28 of the daybook, we learn that ""Edmund"" was a ""shoe maker."" We also learn the names of others who only appear as numbers in the aforementioned ledger including ""William,"" ""Jefferson,"" ""Old Magy,"" ""Harry,"" ""Mary,"" ""Amy,"" and ""Nelson,"" who was ""a slave with the wooden Leg."" The daybook also includes printed receipts from two Richmond newspapers, the Whig and the Inquirer, for advertisements for the auction of a slave in 1834. The daybook also includes a receipt for taxes paid in 1836 on ""10 negroes & 10 horse & Carriage [$] 5.10"" Whether or not there is any relationship between the Minors and Madisons, or amongst their slaves we have been not been able to ascertain, however, it presents a worthy research project."

      [Bookseller: University Archives]
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        SAN KOKF TSOU RAN TO SETS, OU APERCU GENERAL DES TROISS. ROYAUMES. Complete Ahead of Title: SANGUO TONGLAN TUSHUO. By Hayashi, Shihei.

      SUPERB EARLY HAND-COLORED MAPS OF CHINA, COREA, JAPAN, AINU [Paris 1832, - Murray]. Single sheet from the atlas, title:SCEAU DU ROI DE LIEOU KHIEOUN, sheet size 15 x 24 cm., verygood, shows the Loo Choo King's seal & ca. 9.5 x 9.5 cm.,coopper etched, seal characters & a Buddhist script. R A R E Color scans available for this book on request. Description content 2015Copyright Rare Oriental Books Co.

      [Bookseller: RARE ORIENTAL BOOK CO., ABAA, ILAB]
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        Phisiologie de la Poire, par Louis - Benoit

      chez les libraires 1832 (Grandville). Phisiologie de la Poire, par Louis - Benoit, jardinier. Paris, chez les libraires, 1832. In - 8°, m. pelle, dorso decorato in oro. xxii, 270 pp. Edizione originale di questo violento libello contro il governo di Louis Philippe. L' autore, il notaio Sébastien - Benoit Peytel fu condannato a morte per assassinio e giustiziato a Bourg - en - Bresse nel 1839. Il volume è illustrato da qualche piccola vignetta incisa in legno da Grandville. Prezioso esemplare ornato da 40 piccoli disegni originali del GRANDVILLE, in margine a una dozzina di Pagine. Rarissimo.

      [Bookseller: Brighenti libri esauriti e rari]
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        Pitture a fresco del camposanto di Pisa. Disegnate e incise da Giuseppe Rossi e dal prof. cav. G.P. Lasinio figlio.

      - Firenze, tipografia all'insegna di Dante di Luigi di Giuseppe Molini, 1832, in-folio, leg. della prima metà dell'800 in mezza pelle, titolo e fregi in oro al dorso (dorso che presenta delle spallature), pp. [4], 41, [1], [4] + 46 tavv. incise in rame. Bell'esemplare, completo del supplemento con la descrizione delle tavv. aggiunte (tavv. 45 e 46: descrizione preceduta da un secondo frontespizio tipografico). [Attributes: Hard Cover]

      [Bookseller: Libreria Oreste Gozzini snc]
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        Coleccion de Leyes, Decretos y Ordenes del Augusto Congreso.

      1832 - Early Compilation of the Constitutions and Laws of Yucatan [Mexico]. [Yucatan]. Coleccion de Leyes, Decretos y Ordenes del Augusto Congreso del Estado Libre de Yucatan. Corregida y Aumentada por una Comision Nombrada por la Sesta Lejislatura Constitucional. Merida: Imprenta de Lorenzo Segui, 1832. Two volumes. [ii], xxiv, 176 [i.e. 276]; [ii], xx, 254 pp. Octavo (7-1/2" x 5"). Contemporary quarter calf over marbled boards, titles stamped to spine. Light rubbing to boards, chipping to spine ends, gilding worn away from titles, corners bumped and moderately worn, a few partial cracks to text blocks, early owner bookplates to front pastedowns. Light toning to text, somewhat darker in places, foxing and dampstaining to a few leaves, internally clean. Ex-library. Location labels to spines, stamps and annotations to versos of title pages. A nice copy of a very scarce title. * Yucatan, which includes the present-day states of Campeche and Quaintana Roo, was a sovereign state during two periods of the nineteenth century. The first Republic of Yucatan was established on May 29, 1823 during the collapse of the Mexican Empire. It joined the succeeding Federated Republic of Yucatan on December 23, 1823. The second Republic of Yucatan was established in 1841. It lasted seven years, after which it rejoined the Mexican Federation. The first compilation of Yucatan's laws was issued in 1825. That and the more-extensive 1832 compilation offer a legal and legislative record of the first republic and an interesting look at Yucatan's place in the Federated Republic. Volume I: Comprende las del Constituyente; Volume II: Comprende las de las Seis Primeras Lejislaturas Constitucionales Desde 20 de Agosto de 1825 Hasta 5 de Marzo de 1832. OCLC locates 3 copies in North America (Harvard Law School, NY Public Library, University of Michigan Law School). [Attributes: Hard Cover]

      [Bookseller: The Lawbook Exchange, Ltd., ABAA ILAB]
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        The philological museum

      Cambridge: Pr. by J. Smith for Deightons, Rivingtons, & Parker 8vo (22.1 cm, 8.7"). 2 vols. I: iv, iv, 706 pp.; 1 fold. facs. II: iv, 706 pp.. 1832–33 First edition: The first two and only volumes published of a journal devoted to classical literature from the "philological point of view" (p. i). Connop Thirwall, who along with Hare was one of the founders of the periodical, submitted his essay "On the Irony of Sophocles" to the work; the "Translation of Part of the First Book of the AEneid" was written by Wordsworth. Contemporary half vellum over marbled paper–covered sides, spines with gilt-stamped leather title-labels; sides and edges scuffed, vol. II with vellum starting to peel or lift up in several places; despite qualifications, neither unsound nor unattractive. Front pastedowns each with private collector's 19th-century bookplate and with institutional stamp (no other markings); front pastedown of vol. I with bookseller's ticket from B. Westermann & Co. of New York. Some faint foxing, more pronounced to endpapers; some corners dog-eared.

      [Bookseller: SessaBks, A Division of the Philadelphia]
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        Schul Gesänge für John Peter Becker [School chants for John Peter Becker], Baltimore April the 17., 1845

      Oblong octavo, 210 x 108 mm. Half dark tan leather. [i] (blank), [lvii] (music), [xii] (blank), [vii] (alphabetical index), [i] (blank). Notated in ink on hand-ruled staves (index in pencil). With octagonal cut-paper manuscript title label to upper in ink, "1832" added in pencil. Contains a total of 101 numbered pieces set for three high voices (most probably children's voices) in tablature for scale degree solmization (1= do, 2=re, 3=mi, etc., with "movable do"). Titling to each piece in German cursive. The majority of the pieces are hymns, with some liturgical chants; all belong to the Lutheran tradition. With text to no. 82, "Wie sie so sanft ruhn" [How softly they rest] only. Binding considerably worn, rubbed, bumped and shaken; spine lacking. Moderately browned; some creasing, dampstaining, and other staining; several leaves frayed at lower edge; some leaves very slightly trimmed at upper edge just affecting text. In quite good condition overall. . The present manuscript, in unusual numeric notation, dates from an important period in Lutheranism in America. "In the mid-19th century there was a new influx of immigrants from different areas of Germany, each of which had its own hymnal. In their desire to be doctrinally orthodox they turned away from much in these hymnals and rediscovered the rugged hymns of the 16th century. They abandoned the later isometric forms of the melodies in favor of the original rhythmic forms as they found them in Friedrich Layriz's chorale books, Kern des deutschen Kirchengesang (Nördlingen, 1844-45). These volumes, and his liturgical settings for Loehe's Agenda (Nördlingen, 1853), helped to make Layriz influential in forming the musical ideals of Lutheranism in the USA. As in Germany, the recovery of early Lutheran hymnody led to a rediscovery of classic Lutheran composers and their music." Robin A. Leaver, Ann Bond and M. Alfred Bichsel in American Grove III, p. 129. The three-part settings and their notation afford considerable insight into the practice of the Lutheran church of mid-nineteenth century America and also into the choral pedagogy of the time. Most probably compiled by or for a student of a German-speaking Lutheran school (or Sunday school) in Baltimore. We have been unable to locate any biographical information on Becker. The volume testifies to the influence of the Lutheran clergyman and polymath Johann Friedrich Wilhelm Koch (1759-1831), who in his Gesanglehre [Treatise on singing] for elementary school teachers (Magdeburg: Heinrichshofen, 1814), which was widely used in mid-nineteenth century Germany, describes and champions the characteristic numeric notation used here. The majority of hymns and chants in the collection are still widely used, especially by Lutheran churches in Germany and (in translation) elsewhere, even though many melodies have undergone minor changes. The oldest hymns date back to Luther (some of them, in turn, based on Latin chant), while there are also a few new contemporary pieces.The last number, "Auferstehn, ja auferstehn" [Resurge, yes, resurge], a hymn by Friedrich Gottlieb Klopstock (1724-1803) famously quoted in Gustav Mahler's Second Symphony, is a later addition to the present collection (by the same scribe), not listed in the alphabetical index but on a separate page under the heading "Verschiedene Register" [various indexes] as its only entry. The text below no. 82 (not strictly an underlay) is an oddity: while the music is that of the funeral hymn "Wie sie so sanft ruhn," immensely popular in Germany at the time (text by J. P. Lange, 1802-84), the continuation of the text is not: "Wie sie so sanft ruhn, alle die Seligen, zu deren Wohnplatz jetzt meine Seele eilt. Wie sie so sanft ruhn, in die Gräber tief zur Verwesung hinabgesenket" [How softly they rest, all the blessed to whose dwelling my soul now is rushing. How softly they rest, here in their graves, deeply sunk for decomposition]. These words, not quite in the spirit of the church, are a quotation from the horror story "Das Raubschloss" (The Robber Baron Castle, 1812) by Heinrich Clauren (1771-1854), which was no less popular then. It may be assumed that the compiler of the present volume intended this as a joke, with another joke being the comment at the conclusion of no. 93, "Das Amen" [the Amen]: instead of "Ende" [end], the scribe wrote "Ente" [duck].

      [Bookseller: J & J Lubrano Music Antiquarians LLC]
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        Der englische Zeichenmeister. Oder die neuesten Methoden, Erfindungen und Verbesserungen im Zeichnen, Tuschen, Coloriren, Malen und Farbenbereiten. Mit deutschen Zusätzen und Bemerkungen verm. von A. Müller. 2. Auflage.

      Quedlinburg und Leipzig, Basse, 1832. - (17,5 x 1 cm). (2) 110 S. Mit 2 mehrfach gefalteten lithographierten Tafeln. Pappband der Zeit. Interessanter Band mit Beschreibungen der neuesten, teils ausgefallenen Zeichen- und Schreibgeräte sowie speziellen Linealen und Winkelmessern, darunter Haupes Malkasten, Palmers Liniermaschine, Tachets Zeicheninstrument etc. Die Tafeln mit Abbildungen der entsprechenden Geräte. - Stellenweise leicht stockfleckig bzw. gebräunt. Vorderer Einband mit kleinen braunen Flecken im oberen Teil, sonst gut erhalten. - Engelmann, Bibl. mech.-techn. 164 [Attributes: Hard Cover]

      [Bookseller: Antiquariat Gerhard Gruber]
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        "Schwäb: Hall, v.d. Süd-Seite". Prächtige Gesamtansicht.

      . Lithographie von D. Englert, dat. 1832, 28 x 44,5 cm.. Schefold 7281. - Zwei Einrisse im breiten Rand oben und rechts unten, dieser nicht sichtbar bis ins Bild. Rare Ansicht.

      [Bookseller: Peter Bierl Buch- & Kunstantiquariat]
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        SCHWÄBISCH-HALL. "Schwäb: Hall, v.d. Süd-Seite". Prächtige Gesamtansicht.

      - Lithographie von D. Englert, dat. 1832, 28 x 44,5 cm. Schefold 7281. - Zwei Einrisse im breiten Rand oben und rechts unten, dieser nicht sichtbar bis ins Bild. Rare Ansicht.

      [Bookseller: Peter Bierl Buch- & Kunstantiquariat]
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        SAN KOKF TSOU RAN TO SETS, OU APERCU GENERAL DES TROISS. ROYAUMES. Complete Ahead of Title: SANGUO TONGLAN TUSHUO. By Hayashi, Shihei.

      SUPERB EARLY HAND-COLORED MAPS OF CHINA, COREA, JAPAN, AINU [Paris 1832, - Murray]. Single sheet map from the atlas,title:CARTE DES HUIT PROVINCES DU TCHAO SIAN [Corea], copper etch-ed and hand-colord, 53.5 x 74.5 cm., folded down to 23 x 30cm., yellow outline, Touoimatao Tsoushima at bottom, clean ! Color scans available for this book on request. Description content 2015Copyright Rare Oriental Books Co.

      [Bookseller: RARE ORIENTAL BOOK CO., ABAA, ILAB]
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        A LITHOGRAPH WITH HAND-COLOURING IN GOUACHE OF CANTON HONGS,THE QUAY, SHOWING THE FORIEGN FACTORIES, AND THEIR FLAGS: American, British, Spanish, French, Dutch, as Chinese Junks Ply the Harbour.

      A LOVELY HAND-COLORED GOUACHE LITHO OF CANTON HARBOUR & QUAY[Canton ca. 1832- - 41]. A large lithograph, hand colouredgouache, lower left corner states "Canton," very good, 38.5x 25.2 cm., gilt framed & glazed to 63 x 50.5 cm.,very cleanunsigned work. A UNIQUE AND RARE EARLY CANTON VIEW Color scans available for this book on request. Description content 2015Copyright Rare Oriental Books Co.

      [Bookseller: RARE ORIENTAL BOOK CO., ABAA, ILAB]
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        Des maladies chroniques, de leur nature spéciale et de leur traitement homeopathique

      - Lyon, Louis Babeuf, 1832. In/8 reliure demi-basane verte, dos lisse à filets et titres dorés, 600 p. Petites usures sur le dos ; rousseurs claires éparses.Christian Friedrich Samuel HAHNEMANN (Meisse 1755 - Paris 1843) fut le fondateur de l’homoeopathie.

      [Bookseller: Philippe Lucas Livres Anciens]
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        Paris, ou le livre des cent-et-un

      first edition.Binders romantic half-calf cherry with corners, back with five false nerves ornate gilded nets and cold and cold florets, parts of title and volume number of black morocco, paper boards to the tank. Headdress head with the thirteenth volume rugged little lack; small shock without missing on the tail cap of the last volume. Chez Ladvocat Paris 1832-1834 14x23cm 12 volumes relié

      [Bookseller: Librairie Le Feu Follet]
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        "Königlich Bayerisches Linien- und Bürgermilitär" (Pressler). Folge von 9 Darstellungen des bayerischen Militärs "nach der neuesten Ordonnanz vom Jahre 1825" (Pressler).

      . 9 altkol. Lithographien von Gustav Kraus bei Hochwind, Mchn., 1832, je ca. 10,5 x 13,5 cm.. Pressler 612-620; R. Colas (1969) I, 1662; Lentner 5845 (nur 6 Blätter): "Sehr seltene Folge!". - Nach Pressler-Nummern: 612) Königl. Bayer. General Staab. (Der Stab von rechts nach links reitend, voran Generalfeldmarschall Fürst Wrede, dann die Generäle Fürst Löwenstein-Wertheim und Graf Pappenheim). 613) K. Bayerische Linien Infanterie (Leibregmt. sowie 1.-6. Regiment. Im Hintergrund Regensburg). 614) K. Bayerische Linien Infanterie (7.-15. Regiment. Im Hintergrund Nürnberg). 615) K. Bayerische Cürassiers (1. und 2. Regiment. Im Hintergrund München). 616) K. Bayerische Chevauxlegers (1.-6. Regiment. Im Hintergrund Speyer). 617) K. Bayerische Artillerie (leicht und schwere Artillerie, Ingenieur und Sapeur). 618) K. Bayerische Iäger und Gendarmerie zu Fuss und zu Pferd. 619) K. Bayerisches Bürger Militair. Infanterie (Im Hintergrund die Frauenkirche von München). 620) K. Bayerisches Bürger Militair. Kavalerie und Artillerie. - Ohne den Umschlag. Mit Lichtrand, die Ränder leicht gebräunt. - "Die Lithographien sind so natürlich u. lebendig gezeichnet, das Colorit ist abgesehen von seiner Wahrheitstreue von einer solchen Feinheit und Vollendung im Ton, dass man glaubt, Aquarelle eines tüchtigen Künstlers vor sich zu haben" (Lentner).

      [Bookseller: Peter Bierl Buch- & Kunstantiquariat]
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        MILITARIA. - Bayern. "Königlich Bayerisches Linien- und Bürgermilitär" (Pressler). Folge von 9 Darstellungen des bayerischen Militärs "nach der neuesten Ordonnanz vom Jahre 1825" (Pressler).

      - 9 altkol. Lithographien von Gustav Kraus bei Hochwind, Mchn., 1832, je ca. 10,5 x 13,5 cm. Pressler 612-620; R. Colas (1969) I, 1662; Lentner 5845 (nur 6 Blätter): "Sehr seltene Folge!". - Nach Pressler-Nummern: 612) Königl. Bayer. General Staab. (Der Stab von rechts nach links reitend, voran Generalfeldmarschall Fürst Wrede, dann die Generäle Fürst Löwenstein-Wertheim und Graf Pappenheim). 613) K. Bayerische Linien Infanterie (Leibregmt. sowie 1.-6. Regiment. Im Hintergrund Regensburg). 614) K. Bayerische Linien Infanterie (7.-15. Regiment. Im Hintergrund Nürnberg). 615) K. Bayerische Cürassiers (1. und 2. Regiment. Im Hintergrund München). 616) K. Bayerische Chevauxlegers (1.-6. Regiment. Im Hintergrund Speyer). 617) K. Bayerische Artillerie (leicht und schwere Artillerie, Ingenieur und Sapeur). 618) K. Bayerische Iäger und Gendarmerie zu Fuss und zu Pferd. 619) K. Bayerisches Bürger Militair. Infanterie (Im Hintergrund die Frauenkirche von München). 620) K. Bayerisches Bürger Militair. Kavalerie und Artillerie. - Ohne den Umschlag. Mit Lichtrand, die Ränder leicht gebräunt. - "Die Lithographien sind so natürlich u. lebendig gezeichnet, das Colorit ist abgesehen von seiner Wahrheitstreue von einer solchen Feinheit und Vollendung im Ton, dass man glaubt, Aquarelle eines tüchtigen Künstlers vor sich zu haben" (Lentner). [Attributes: Hard Cover]

      [Bookseller: Peter Bierl Buch- & Kunstantiquariat]
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        Afbildninger med vedføiede Beskrivelser over Amphibierne, tildeels efter Kobbere i de Værker, hvortil Professor Dr. Joh. Frid. Blumenbach i sin Hanndbog i Naturhistorien henviser.

      Kjøbenhavn, C. Steen, 1832. II + Upag. med tekster til 42 kobberstukne og håndkolorerede farveplancherr, samt register. Indb. samt. halvlæder med guld.dek. ryg.. Med slid på bindet og nogle brune pletter på siderne, samt gl. plet på de sidste friblade.Med alle plancher intakte, men 1 ligger løs. (Porto kr. 40,- på brevforsendelser i Danmark)

      [Bookseller: Bøger & Kuriosa]
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        Declaration of Independence, in Congress, July 4, 1776: The Unanimous Declaration of the Thirteen United States of America

      New York: Humphry Phelps and Bele Squire. October, 1832. Letterpress printing on cream paper, text and most decorations in black. With expert restoration, laid on rice paper. Approximately 29.5 x 20.5 inches overall, printed area 24 x 19 inches, or 71 x 48 cms. From the very beginning this document has been “the” pivotal document in U. S. history. The Declaration of Independence has been printed many, many times since its original publication in 1776. First as a broadside, then as an important addition in law books. The original of the Declaration [the “parchment” copy which was actually signed by Congress] was displayed, often in very poor conditions, and as a consequence suffered damage: the ink flaked and faded, and the parchment became darkened and creased, etc. Two early facsimile printings of the Declaration were made during the second decade of the 19th century: those of Benjamin Owen Tyler (1818) and John Binns (1819). Both facsimiles used decorative and ornamental elements to enhance the text of the Declaration. Richard Rush, who was Acting Secretary of State in 1817, remarked on September 10 of that year about the Tyler copy: "The foregoing copy of the Declaration of Independence has been collated with the original instrument and found correct. I have myself examined the signatures to each. Those executed by Mr. Tyler, are curiously exact imitations, so much so, that it would be difficult, if not impossible, for the closest scrutiny to distinguish them, were it not for the hand of time, from the originals." Rush's reference to "the hand of time" suggests that the signatures were already fading in 1817, only 40 years after they were first affixed to the parchment. One later theory as to why the Declaration was aging so soon after its creation stems from the common 18th-century practice of taking "press copies." Press copies were made by placing a damp sheet of thin paper on a manuscript and pressing it until a portion of the ink was transferred. The thin paper copy was retained in the same manner as a modern carbon copy. The ink was reimposed on a copper plate, which was then etched so that copies could be run off the plate on a press. This "wet transfer" method may have been used by William J. Stone when in 1820 he was commissioned by Secretary of State John Quincy Adams to make a facsimile of the entire Declaration, signatures as well as text. By June 5, 1823, almost exactly 47 years after Jefferson's first draft of the Declaration, the (Washington) National Intelligencer was able to report "that Mr. William J. Stone, a respectable and enterprising Engraver of this City, has, after a labor of three years, completed a fac simile of the original of the Declaration of Independence, now in the archives of the government; that it is executed with the greatest exactness and fidelity; and that the Department of State has become the purchaser of the plate." The copies made from Stone's copperplate established the clear visual image of the Declaration for generations of Americans. The 200 official parchment copies struck from the Stone plate carry the identification "Engraved by W. J. Stone for the Department of State, by order" in the upper left corner followed by "of J. Q. Adams, Sec. of State July 4th 1823." in the upper right corner. "Unofficial" copies that were struck later do not have the identification at the top of the document. Instead the engraver identified his work by engraving "W. J. Stone SC. Washn." near the lower left corner and burnishing out the earlier identification. Since the original Declaration consisted of text and signatures, the later broadsides and lithographs were embellished with borders, vignettes, other decorations, and facsimile signatures. Humphrey Phelps was a map maker in New York, and he together with Bele S. Squire, published a new version of the Declaration in 1832, the same year that Charles Carroll, the last surviving signer of the original Declaration, died. This has the original text and names the signatories in the conventional way, with woodcut illustrations of the American Eagle and the Capitol framing the text, surrounded by elaborate vignettes from the thirteen states with statistical information for each. An elaborate arch with climbing acanthus leaves and topped by the American Eagle is immediately framing the text. Additional vignettes naming the Presidents, reigning Sovereigns, Governors and the National Debt adorn each corner. The whole surrounded by an elaborate border. A very attractive and informative issue [Two copies located by OCLC: Albert Small Collection at University of Virginia, and Yale University].

      [Bookseller: Randall House Rare Books]
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        PHILOBIBLON, A TREATISE ON THE LOVE OF BOOKS

      Thomas Rodd, London 1832 - 8vo. original cloth with paper spine label. viii, 152 pages. First translation into English of this classic book on the love of books. The translation was done by John Bellingham Inglis from the text of the 1473 edition. MacLagan calls the translation "a work of more spirit than accuracy, ." Wear at spine ends with some lose of cloth at head of spine. Spine label partially chipped off. Old ink note on verso of title page. With old underlining in purple pencil and some annotations in margin and on back free endpaper. original cloth with paper spine label [Attributes: Hard Cover]

      [Bookseller: Oak Knoll Books, ABAA, ILAB]
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        MÜNCHEN. - Zwiesel. - Karte. "Chaussee von München über Freising nach Landshut" (Tab. A) und "Chaussee von München nach Landshut Deggendorf Regen und Zwisel" (Tab. B - D).

      - 4 altkol. Kupferstiche aus Riedl, 1832, je 22 x 14 cm. Aus der sehr seltenen Fortsetzung des Adrian von Riedlschen Reise-Atlas von 1835. - Die vier Straßenkarten zeigen u. a. München, Freimann, Ismaning, Garching, Fröttmaning, Freising, Moosburg, Landshut, Ergolding, Wörth, Dingolfing, Landau, Plattling, Deggendorf, Regen und Zwiesel. - Breitrandig und sehr gut erhalten.

      [Bookseller: Peter Bierl Buch- & Kunstantiquariat]
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        Des maladies chroniques, de leur nature spéciale et de leur traitement homeopathique

      Lyon, Louis Babeuf, 1832. In / 8 reliure demi - basane verte, dos lisse à filets et titres dorés, 600 p. Petites usures sur le dos ; rousseurs claires éparses. Christian Friedrich Samuel HAHNEMANN (Meisse 1755 - Paris 1843) fut le fondateur de l?homoeopathie. relié DeCollection

      [Bookseller: Livres Anciens Lucas Philippe]
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        Schul Gesänge für John Peter Becker [School chants for John Peter Becker], Baltimore April the 17., 1845.

      . Oblong octavo, 210 x 108 mm. Half dark tan leather. [i] (blank), [lvii] (music), [xii] (blank), [vii] (alphabetical index), [i] (blank). Notated in ink on hand-ruled staves (index in pencil). With octagonal cut-paper manuscript title label to upper in ink, "1832" added in pencil. Contains a total of 101 numbered pieces set for three high voices (most probably children's voices) in tablature for scale degree solmization (1= do, 2=re, 3=mi, etc., with "movable do"). Titling to each piece in German cursive. The majority of the pieces are hymns, with some liturgical chants; all belong to the Lutheran tradition. With text to no. 82, "Wie sie so sanft ruhn" [How softly they rest] only. Binding considerably worn, rubbed, bumped and shaken; spine lacking. Moderately browned; some creasing, dampstaining, and other staining; several leaves frayed at lower edge; some leaves very slightly trimmed at upper edge just affecting text. In quite good condition overall.. The present manuscript, in unusual numeric notation, dates from an important period in Lutheranism in America. "In the mid-19th century there was a new influx of immigrants from different areas of Germany, each of which had its own hymnal. In their desire to be doctrinally orthodox they turned away from much in these hymnals and rediscovered the rugged hymns of the 16th century. They abandoned the later isometric forms of the melodies in favor of the original rhythmic forms as they found them in Friedrich Layriz's chorale books, Kern des deutschen Kirchengesang (Nördlingen, 1844-45). These volumes, and his liturgical settings for Loehe's Agenda (Nördlingen, 1853), helped to make Layriz influential in forming the musical ideals of Lutheranism in the USA. As in Germany, the recovery of early Lutheran hymnody led to a rediscovery of classic Lutheran composers and their music." Robin A. Leaver, Ann Bond and M. Alfred Bichsel in American Grove III, p. 129. The three-part settings and their notation afford considerable insight into the practice of the Lutheran church of mid-nineteenth century America and also into the choral pedagogy of the time. Most probably compiled by or for a student of a German-speaking Lutheran school (or Sunday school) in Baltimore. We have been unable to locate any biographical information on Becker. The volume testifies to the influence of the Lutheran clergyman and polymath Johann Friedrich Wilhelm Koch (1759-1831), who in his Gesanglehre [Treatise on singing] for elementary school teachers (Magdeburg: Heinrichshofen, 1814), which was widely used in mid-nineteenth century Germany, describes and champions the characteristic numeric notation used here. The majority of hymns and chants in the collection are still widely used, especially by Lutheran churches in Germany and (in translation) elsewhere, even though many melodies have undergone minor changes. The oldest hymns date back to Luther (some of them, in turn, based on Latin chant), while there are also a few new contemporary pieces.The last number, "Auferstehn, ja auferstehn" [Resurge, yes, resurge], a hymn by Friedrich Gottlieb Klopstock (1724- 1803) famously quoted in Gustav Mahler's Second Symphony, is a later addition to the present collection (by the same scribe), not listed in the alphabetical index but on a separate page under the heading "Verschiedene Register" [various indexes] as its only entry. The text below no. 82 (not strictly an underlay) is an oddity: while the music is that of the funeral hymn "Wie sie so sanft ruhn," immensely popular in Germany at the time (text by J. P. Lange, 1802-84), the continuation of the text is not: "Wie sie so sanft ruhn, alle die Seligen, zu deren Wohnplatz jetzt meine Seele eilt. Wie sie so sanft ruhn, in die Gräber tief zur Verwesung hinabgesenket" [How softly they rest, all the blessed to whose dwelling my soul now is rushing. How softly they rest, here in their graves, deeply sunk for decomposition]. These words, not quite in the spirit of the church, are a quotation from the horror story "Das Raubschloss" (The Robber Baron Castle, 1812) by Heinrich Clauren (1771-1854), which was no less popular then. It may be assumed that the compiler of the present volume intended this as a joke, with another joke being the comment at the conclusion of no. 93, "Das Amen" [the Amen]: instead of "Ende" [end], the scribe wrote "Ente" [duck].

      [Bookseller: J & J Lubrano Music Antiquarians LLC]
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        Domestic Manners of the Americans

      London: Printed for Whittaker, Treacher & Co, 1832. First edition, with half titles. 24 lithographed plates by Ducôtes after drawings by Hervieu. 2 vols. 8vo. Three-quarter contemporary tan calf and marbled boards, hinges starting, but sound, gilt spine. Booklabel of George Wm. Mercer Henderson, Busby Lodge. Needless to say, contemporary Americans were not amused, and the resulting international rancor alone would be sufficient to place it among classic American travels. But if the tone of Mrs. Trollope's book, called by Streeter "a minor classic of looking down one's nose," does rankle, even the most hypersensitive of Americans can't help but chuckle aloud at the hilarious and rollicking Rowlandsonesque illustrations which accompany her schoolmarmish musings.

      [Bookseller: James Cummins Bookseller]
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        K.M.H. Bauausführungen des Preussischen Staats. Für den Dienstgebrauch herausgegeben von dem Ministerium des Innern. Dritte Lieferung. Blatt 25 bis 36 (Blatt 34 fehlt!). 11 Kupferstichtafeln im Format 30,5 x 41 cm bis 28 x 80 cm.

      [Berlin]: Pretre ( um 1832).. In einem Halbleinwandband der Zeit mit marmoriertem Überzugspapier und montiertem Deckelschild, Quer-2°, 43 x 84 cm.. (alter Stempel und Signatur einer dänischen Offiziersschule auf Vorsatz, Einband berieben und bestoßen sowie weitere Gebrauchs-, Staub- und Alterungsspuren, Tafeln kaum stockfleckig, für das Alter durchaus ordentlicher Zustand) Initiator und Herausgeber der "Bauausführungen" war Christian Wilhelm Peter Beuth (1781-1853) im (1830 noch für Bauangelegenheiten zuständigen) Handelsministerium. 1848 ging die Zuständigkeit an das "Ministerium der öffentlichen Arbeiten" über , die Zuständigkeit des Innenministeriums muß also im Zeitraum zwischen diesen Jahren liegen. Obwohl die Tafeln angeblich im von Beuth geleiteten Gewerbeinstitut gestochen und gedruckt wurden, tragen alle uns vorliegenden Tafeln den Vermerk "gedr. v. Pretre". Die "Oberbaudeputation" mit ihren mindestens fünf Mitgliedern hatte die planende und überwachende Kompetenz für die öffentlichen Bauten Preußens. Karl Friedrich Schinkel (1781-1841) war 1810 in die Oberbaudeputation berufen worden. Neben Schinkel hatte die Oberbaudeputation zunächst vier, ab 1821 sieben Mitglieder. Den Vorsitz führte der dienstälteste Baurat: Bis 1830 Johann Albert Eytelwein, danach Schinkel, nach dessen Tod 1841 August Adolph Günther und ab 1842 Carl Ludwig Schmid. Alle Entscheidungen wurden "kollegialisch" getroffen. - Vgl. Ausstellung "Neben Schinkel. Bauausführungen des preußischen Staats." der TU Berlin vom 7.5.-7.6.2002. Auch nach dem Ende der Ausstellung wird diese im Internet unter www.schinkelzentrum.tu-berlin.de zu sehen sein. Unter anderem sind dort die in unserem Band vorhandenen Tafeln 25, 27, 30 und 31 zu sehen. - Im Einzelnen zeigen die Tafeln unseres Bandes: Bl. 25-26 "Malapaner Kettenbrücke" (Malapane in Oberschlesien, heute Ozimek, die Bauausführung lag in den Händen von Maschineninspektor Schottelius); Bl. 27 "Zeichnung einer zu Peitz ueber den Hammer-Strom erbauten Roehren-Bruecke"; Bl. 28 "Hydraulische Presse"; Bl. 29-31 "Entwurf zum Gymnasien-Gebäude zu Stettin" (Architekt war Wilhelm Heinrich Matthias, gestorben 1846); Bl. 32-33 "Plan von dem Ausflusse des Swine Stroms in die Ost-See aufgenommen 1739"; Bl. 34 fehlt!; Bl. 35 zeigt eine "Feuerbraake" (Leuchtfeuer?), eine "Lootsen-Warte" (die an den Leuchtturm von Kap Arkona erinnert) und andere Wasserbaukonstruktionen; Bl. 36 "Kirche vor dem Rosenthaler Thor in der Invaliden-Strasse". Die Tafeln, soweit bezeichnet, sind gestochen von Carl Mare "in Berlin 1832" und von Schwechten nach Zeichnungen von Schwenger, G.Büttner und Collins. Obwohl bei den Entwürfen der technische Aspekt im Vordergrund steht, haben die Tafeln einen hohen ästethischen Reiz und wären passpartouriert und gerahmt eine Zierde für jedes Architekturbüro.

      [Bookseller: Versandantiquariat Bürck]
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        Vita di Napoleone Buonaparte Imperatore dei francesi

      Presso Salvatore Barcellona 1832 - 1833, Palermo - Preceduta da un quadro preliminare della rivoluzione francese - Traduzione italiana - in 8° - pp.250 pagine circa a volume - Mezza pergamena - Quattordici volumi - Taglio inferiore spruzzato - Fioriture alle pagine - Libro usato [Attributes: Hard Cover]

      [Bookseller: Antica Libreria Srl]
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        Ueber Kunst und Alterthum [(Bd.1,) H.1-3:] in den Rhein und Mayn Gegenden. Erster Band. Erstes Heft (- Sechster Band. Drittes Heft). Achtzehn Hefte in sechs Bänden. Mit fünf Kupfern, davon eins gefaltet, und zwei gefalteten Tabellen.

      Stuttgart, in der Cottaischen Buchhandlung 1816 - 1832 - Halblederbände der Zeit mit Rückenschild und -vergoldung. Etwas berieben, an Ecken und Kapitalen etwas bestoßen, Leder über den Gelenken teils etwas mürbe und am Vordergelenk von Bd.6 rissig. Von den wiederholten illustrierten, aber textlosen Orig.-Umschlägen des ersten Bandes ist ein Vorder- und ein Rückumschlag vorhanden, zu allen übrigen Heften sind die bedruckten Orig.-Umschläge beigebunden. Erste Ausgabe (Hagen 487; Goedeke IV/III,542-571; Diesch 1644; Kirchner 4115). - Teils etwas (stock-)fleckig, teils etwas gebräunt, Vorsätze und Titel teils mit handschriftl. Namen "G.F.Quentell", einmal datiert 1832; es handelt sich vermutlich um den Maler GUSTAV QUENTELL, der nach 1833 in Köln bei Simon Meister studierte und seit 1838 in Detmold lebte und malte (vgl. u.a. Thieme/B. 27,512). Mit allen Haupt- und Nebentiteln (zu Bd.3,H.6 erschien kein Hefttitel) vollständiges Exemplar, absolut zeitgenöss mit den Orig.-Broschuren gebunden besonders bemerkenswert, da der Absatz so schleppend verlief, daß um 1900 noch alle Hefte lieferbar waren und heute Exemplare im Orig.-Lieferzustand bzw. mit den Umschlägen in neueren Einbänden deutlich häufiger zu finden sind als zeitgenössisch gebundene. Die Umschläge "sind wichtig, da sie [d.h. die zu Bd.2ff.] nicht nur Inhaltsverzeichnisse und Verlagsanzeigen, sondern teilweise auch Nachträge und Sprüche enthalten." (Deneke 478). Eine "wilde Scizze" zu dem Umschlag des ersten Bandes stammt von GOETHE selbst, in ihr hat er Eindrücke seines Besuchs des Kölner Doms wiedergegeben (vgl. P.Raabe, Goethes Umschlag, S.40, in: Festgruss für Hans Pyritz), ausgearbeitet hat sie HEINRICH MEYER und in Kupfer gestochen C.A.SCHWERDGEBURTH. 16 Jahre nach Beendigung der Propyläen war die in loser Folge über einen Zeitraum von noch einmal 16 Jahren erschienene Zeitschrift "das Publikationsorgan des alten GOETHE für alle kulturellen Belange . Was später als Maximen und Reflexionen bekannt wurde, war in den Heften verstreut, ebenso zahme Xenien." (Conrady). Thematisch breiter gefächert als der Vorgänger machte GOETHE hier auch auf Literatur und Autoren des Auslands aufmerksam, "die mit ihrem Werk die Poesie recht eigentlich repräsentieren: WALTER SCOTT, vor allem aber ALESSANDRO MANZONI und LORD BYRON. Die von GOETHE in seiner Zeitschrift zuerst publizierten Übersetzungen, Betrachtungen und Würdigungen ihrer Werke begründeten den bis heute anhaltenden Weltruhm dieser Poeten." (K.-Hahn, in: Goethe-Jahrbuch 92). Die meisten (285) Beiträge stammen von GOETHE, zahlreiche von H.MEYER, weitere Mitarbeiter waren ECKERMANN und SULPIZ BOISSEREE, den GOETHE im Sommer 1816 besucht hatte und unter dem Eindruck von dessen Sammlung er gleich nach der Rückkehr an den Arbeiten zum ersten Heft begann. Das letzte Heft mit Texten aus GOETHEs Nachlaß von den "Weimarer Kunstfreunden" herausgegeben, "enthält u.a. zwei Briefe GOETHEs über den Abschluß des Faust, wovon der eine, an W.V.HUMBOLDT gerichtet, am 17.März 1832, dem Tag, an dem Goethe tödlich erkrankte, geschrieben ist." (Rech. Trauzettel) [Attributes: First Edition; Hard Cover]

      [Bookseller: A la Recherche]
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        Appointment document with seal signed and sealed by of James Wandesford Butler, 1st Marquess of Ormonde

      1832. No binding. Good. 15 x 9-1/2 inches flat, folded to 7-3/4 x 9-1/2 inches. Signed partially printed document. Two pages. Dated 29th February 1832. With Ormonde red wax seal and signature. Appointing Somerset Richard the Earl of Carrick, to be a Deputy Lieutenant in the County of Kilkenny.Fold tears, open tear at top centre 1 inch and sides 1/2 inch not affecting text, otherwise, good condition. James Wandesford Butler, 1st Marquess of Ormonde and the 19th Earl of Ormonde was an Irish nobleman and politician. Created Marquess of Ormonde in 1825. Butler was a Member of Parliament (MP) for Kilkenny City in the Irish House of Commons in 1796 and served then for Kilkenny County until the Act of Union in 1801. He sat subsequently for the Irish county constituency of County Kilkenny and was member of the UK House of Commons from 1801, until his succession to the peerage, as Earl of Ormonde, in 1820.Somerset Richard Butler , was the 3rd Earl of Carrick. Lord Carrick served as an Irish representative peer from 1819 to 1838. He was created, at the Coronation of George IV, a Peer of the United Kingdom, as Baron Ormonde, of Llanthony, in the county of Monmouth and in 1825.

      [Bookseller: Lord Durham Rare Books (IOBA)]
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        Neuestes Conversationslexikon für alle Stände. Von einer Gesellschaft deutscher Gelehrten bearbeitet. Band I - VIII ( cpl. )

      Brüggemannsche Verlagsgesellschaft; Wigand, Leipzig - Band I - VIII cpl. ( hier ohne den meist fehlenden Tafelband ). Erschienen 1832 - 1838. Mit 491, 542, 594, 512, 567, 632, 747 Seiten ( hier in 1494 Spalten gezählt, wobei einige Spalten hier fehlerhaft und wenige auf dem Kopf fälschlicherweise eingebunden sind ), 510 Seiten ( hier fehlen die Seiten 497 - 504 ). Ansonsten augenscheinlich complett allerdings nicht bis ins einzelnste collationiert. Ohne die lithographierten Tafeln die meist in einem separaten Band erschienen sind. Bibliothekshalbleinen, 4°. Umfangreiches Lexikon mit häufig recht langen und detaillierten Artikeln zu allen Bereichen der Geschichte, Geographie, Politik, Gesellschaft, Kunst etc.vielen biographischen Skizzen usw. Vorläufer des später erschienen " Meyerschen Konversationslexikon ". Zwar in stabilen, aber leider sehr unschönen privat verfertigten Halbleinwandbänden aufgebunden, wobei die ersten 6 Bände jeweils in 2 Bänden zusammengebunden wurden, Bd. 7 und 8 sind einzeln gebunden. Teilweise etwas knapp beschnitten ( nur ganz wenige Seiten mit minimalem Buchstabenverlust ), einige Seiten etwas fleckig, bzw. fingerfleckig. Wenige Seiten etwas angeknickt bzw. eselsohrig. - selten - ( Pic erhältlich / webimage available ) [Attributes: Hard Cover]

      [Bookseller: Antiquariat Friederichsen]
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        Sevilla, Blick vom Ufer des Guadalquivir mit der Kathedrale links und dem Torre del Oro rechts.

      . Aquarell mit Deckweiß gehöht, über Bleistift, auf Zeichenkarton. 21,5:30,5 cm. Papier insgesamt etwas gebräunt, verso Reste alter Verklebung.. Roberts hielt sich in Spanien 1832/33 auf, Anfang Mai 1833 erreichte er Sevilla. Möglicherweise besteht ein Zusammenhang mit Roberts' Litho-Folge "Picturesque Sketches in Spain". Vgl. dazu das Aquarell mit demselben Motiv in Hochformat in der Sammlung der Pierpont Morgan Library, New York (Inv. Nr. 1974.12).

      [Bookseller: Galerie Joseph Fach GmbH]
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        Tales and Novels. In Eighteen Volumes

      Printed for Baldwin and Cradock, et al., London 1832 - Bound in three quarters blue morocco, spines sunned with some rubbing, t.e.g., by Sangorski & Sutcliffe for the Gardenside Bookshop Engraved frontispiece and title pages after Harvey in each volume. 18 vols. 12mo

      [Bookseller: James Cummins Bookseller, ABAA]
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        The British Dominions in North America; or a Topographical and Statistical Description of the Provinces of Lower and Upper Canada, New Brunswick, Nova Scotia, The Islands of Newfoundland, Prince Edward, and Cape Breton ( 2 volumes)

      Longman, Rees, Orme, Brown, Green, and Longman, London 1832 - xxvi,(2p list of plates & errata), 498; (v)-xi, 296 Pp. Vol. 1 -frontis portrait, 10 plates (1 double) and 8 plans. Vol. II - 5 plates and 2 plans (1 folding) including Considerations on (title cont.) Land-Granting ane Emigration to which are annexed, Statistical Tables and Tables of Disstance, &c. This is an remarkable expansion of the Author's 'Topographical Description 1815' based on years of travel and oberservation in his native province. (TPL). Lt.-Colonel Joseph Bouchette (May 14, 1774 – April 8, 1841) was the Canadian Surveyor-General of British North America. His book, Topographical Description of the Province of Lower Canada was published at London in 1815 and also translated into French. It contained the sum knowledge of the territory at that time. The township of Bouchette, Quebec, was named for him. During the War of 1812 he raised and commanded the Quebec Volunteers. In 1813, he was gazetted Lt. Colonel on the Staff of Governor-General Sir George Prévost. Both vols. have been rebound with new end-papers. Vol. has a small tear to bottom inner corner of title page that has been expertly repaired. The frontis portrait has a light water stain. Interior to vol. II in very good condition Modern brown quarter calf with cloth boards and red labels to spine [Attributes: Hard Cover]

      [Bookseller: Schooner Books Ltd.(ABAC/ALAC)]
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        Little Grebe, Podiceps minor

      London 1832 - John Gould (1804-1881). A selection from Birds of Europe. Lithograph with original hand-coloring measuring 14 ½” x 21 ½”. Lithograph accompanied by corresponding natural history description written by John Gould. Condition: Very good. John Gould was without question the most prolific natural history artist of the nineteenth century. He worked during a period of intense fascination with discoveries in natural history, especially regarding knowledge of the wildlife of exotic lands. Gould shared the romantic enthusiasm of his time for such subjects, as well as the popular impulse to catalogue exotic wildlife. He combined his passion for natural history with outstanding scientific, artistic, and entrepreneurial talents. Drawing on these abilities, he embarked on a series of projects that would eventually make him the leading publisher of ornithological illustrations in Victorian Britain. Gould’s unparalleled career spanned five decades, and he produced a monumental series of books of birds throughout the world. Gould planned the Birds of Europe in an effort to redress the imbalance between the study of local and foreign ornithology. In his preface he stated his mission: “the Birds of Europe, in which we are, or ought to be, most interested, have not received that degree of attention which they naturally demand. The present work has been undertaken to supply that deficiency.” Gould portrayed birds native to Europe in a manner that had only been thought appropriate for the colorful species of distant places. In this way he managed to draw much popular interest back to native birds, which were suddenly considered equally beautiful to exotic species. Rich, vibrant color is an important attribute of the best 19th Century prints. Many prints by John Gould found on the market today have modern color that affects both the appearance and the value of these great works. John Gould died in 1881 still actively illustrating and producing fine bird books. His stock of unsold copies, unbound text and plates in various states, lithographic stones, drawings and paintings, amounted to nearly three tons. Many of the uncolored pulls from his monumental "Birds of Europe" have been re-colored in the last thirty years, and these are often found on the market. Fortunately, the difference between original and modern color can be discerned by looking carefully at the print. When modern color is applied to 180 year old paper, the application is inconsistent; the cellulose of the aged paper has begun to breakdown and can no longer evenly absorb the watercolors, resulting in a splotchy uneven appearance All of the Gould bird prints in Arader Galleries' inventory have exquisite original color. The vastly superior quality of original color can be clearly differentiated from new color by its smooth and even appearance. The inks have noticeably deeper, richer tones. The difference can also be seen in the lovely surface "sheen" that results from the application of gum arabic when the lithograph was first pulled. The hand coloring of engravings and lithographs reached its zenith in the 19th Century. Works that still display their original color are more rewarding to view, and will better hold their value in the years to come. ***If you frame up this item with Arader Galleries you can take a 50% discount off the listed price of this work of art.***

      [Bookseller: Arader Galleries San Francisco]
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        Spotted Crake - Zapornia Porzana

      London 1832 - John Gould (1804-1881) A selection from Birds of Europe published in London 1832-37. Lithograph with original hand-coloring measuring 14 ½” x 21 ½” accompanied by corresponding natural history description written by John Gould. Condition: Very good. John Gould was without question the most prolific natural history artist of the nineteenth century. He worked during a period of intense fascination with discoveries in natural history, especially regarding knowledge of the wildlife of exotic lands. Gould shared the romantic enthusiasm of his time for such subjects, as well as the popular impulse to catalogue exotic wildlife. He combined his passion for natural history with outstanding scientific, artistic, and entrepreneurial talents. Drawing on these abilities, he embarked on a series of projects that would eventually make him the leading publisher of ornithological illustrations in Victorian Britain. Gould’s unparalleled career spanned five decades, and he produced a monumental series of books of birds throughout the world. Gould planned the Birds of Europe in an effort to redress the imbalance between the study of local and foreign ornithology. In his preface he stated his mission: “the Birds of Europe, in which we are, or ought to be, most interested, have not received that degree of attention which they naturally demand. The present work has been undertaken to supply that deficiency.” Gould portrayed birds native to Europe in a manner that had only been thought appropriate for the colorful species of distant places. In this way he managed to draw much popular interest back to native birds, which were suddenly considered equally beautiful to exotic species. Rich, vibrant color is an important attribute of the best 19th Century prints. Many prints by John Gould found on the market today have modern color that affects both the appearance and the value of these great works. John Gould died in 1881 still actively illustrating and producing fine bird books. His stock of unsold copies, unbound text and plates in various states, lithographic stones, drawings and paintings, amounted to nearly three tons. Many of the uncolored pulls from his monumental "Birds of Europe" have been recolored in the last thirty years, and these are often found on the market. Fortunately, the difference between original and modern color can be discerned by looking carefully at the print. When modern color is applied to 180 year old paper, the application is inconsistent; the cellulose of the aged paper has begun to breakdown and can no longer evenly absorb the watercolors, resulting in a splotchy uneven appearance All of the Gould bird prints in Arader Galleries' inventory have exquisite original color. The vastly superior quality of original color can be clearly differentiated from new color by its smooth and even appearance. The inks have noticeably deeper, richer tones. The difference can also be seen in the lovely surface "sheen" that results from the application of gum arabic when the lithograph was first pulled. The hand coloring of engravings and lithographs reached its zenith in the 19th Century. Works that still display their original color are more rewarding to view, and will better hold their value in the years to come. ***If you frame up this item with Arader Galleries you can take a 50% discount off the listed price of this work of art.***

      [Bookseller: Arader Galleries San Francisco]
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        Fantail Warbler - Salicaria Cisticola

      London 1832 - ***If you frame up this item with Arader Galleries you can take a 50% discount off the listed price of this work of art.***This splendid hand-colored, folio size lithograph from John Gould's (1804-1881) monumental work "Birds of Europe" is in excellent condition, measures 14 ½” x 21 ½” and magnificently displays the author's scientific skill and attention to detail. John Gould was without question the most prolific natural history artist of the nineteenth century. He worked during a period of intense fascination with discoveries in natural history, especially regarding knowledge of the wildlife of exotic lands. Gould shared the romantic enthusiasm of his time for such subjects, as well as the popular impulse to catalog exotic wildlife. He combined his passion for natural history with outstanding scientific, artistic, and entrepreneurial talents. Drawing on these abilities, he embarked on a series of projects that would eventually make him the leading publisher of ornithological illustrations in Victorian Britain. Gould’s unparalleled career spanned five decades, and he produced a monumental series of books of birds throughout the world. Gould planned the Birds of Europe in an effort to redress the imbalance between the study of local and foreign ornithology. In his preface he stated his mission: “the Birds of Europe, in which we are, or ought to be, most interested, have not received that degree of attention which they naturally demand. The present work has been undertaken to supply that deficiency.” Gould portrayed birds native to Europe in a manner that had only been thought appropriate for the colorful species of distant places. In this way he managed to draw much popular interest back to native birds, which were suddenly considered equally beautiful to exotic species. Rich, vibrant color is an important attribute of the best 19th Century prints. Many prints by John Gould found on the market today have modern color that affects both the appearance and the value of these great works. John Gould died in 1881 still actively illustrating and producing fine bird books. His stock of unsold copies, unbound text and plates in various states, lithographic stones, drawings and paintings, amounted to nearly three tons. Many of the uncolored pulls from his monumental "Birds of Europe" have been recolored in the last thirty years, and these are often found on the market. Fortunately, the difference between original and modern color can be discerned by looking carefully at the print. When modern color is applied to 180 year old paper, the application is inconsistent; the cellulose of the aged paper has begun to breakdown and can no longer evenly absorb the watercolors, resulting in a splotchy uneven appearance All of the Gould bird prints in Arader Galleries' inventory have exquisite original color. The vastly superior quality of original color can be clearly differentiated from new color by its smooth and even appearance. The inks have noticeably deeper, richer tones. The difference can also be seen in the lovely surface "sheen" that results from the application of gum arabic when the lithograph was first pulled. The hand coloring of engravings and lithographs reached its zenith in the 19th Century. Works that still display their original color are more rewarding to view, and will better hold their value in the years to come.

      [Bookseller: Arader Galleries San Francisco]
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        Kentish Plover - Charadrius cantiamus

      London 1832 - John Gould (1804-1881) A selection from Birds of Europe published in London 1832-37. Lithograph with original hand-coloring measuring 14 ½” x 21 ½” accompanied by corresponding natural history description written by John Gould. Condition: Very good. John Gould was without question the most prolific natural history artist of the nineteenth century. He worked during a period of intense fascination with discoveries in natural history, especially regarding knowledge of the wildlife of exotic lands. Gould shared the romantic enthusiasm of his time for such subjects, as well as the popular impulse to catalogue exotic wildlife. He combined his passion for natural history with outstanding scientific, artistic, and entrepreneurial talents. Drawing on these abilities, he embarked on a series of projects that would eventually make him the leading publisher of ornithological illustrations in Victorian Britain. Gould’s unparalleled career spanned five decades, and he produced a monumental series of books of birds throughout the world. Gould planned the Birds of Europe in an effort to redress the imbalance between the study of local and foreign ornithology. In his preface he stated his mission: “the Birds of Europe, in which we are, or ought to be, most interested, have not received that degree of attention which they naturally demand. The present work has been undertaken to supply that deficiency.” Gould portrayed birds native to Europe in a manner that had only been thought appropriate for the colorful species of distant places. In this way he managed to draw much popular interest back to native birds, which were suddenly considered equally beautiful to exotic species. Rich, vibrant color is an important attribute of the best 19th Century prints. Many prints by John Gould found on the market today have modern color that affects both the appearance and the value of these great works. John Gould died in 1881 still actively illustrating and producing fine bird books. His stock of unsold copies, unbound text and plates in various states, lithographic stones, drawings and paintings, amounted to nearly three tons. Many of the uncolored pulls from his monumental "Birds of Europe" have been recolored in the last thirty years, and these are often found on the market. Fortunately, the difference between original and modern color can be discerned by looking carefully at the print. When modern color is applied to 180 year old paper, the application is inconsistent; the cellulose of the aged paper has begun to breakdown and can no longer evenly absorb the watercolors, resulting in a splotchy uneven appearance All of the Gould bird prints in Arader Galleries' inventory have exquisite original color. The vastly superior quality of original color can be clearly differentiated from new color by its smooth and even appearance. The inks have noticeably deeper, richer tones. The difference can also be seen in the lovely surface "sheen" that results from the application of gum arabic when the lithograph was first pulled. The hand coloring of engravings and lithographs reached its zenith in the 19th Century. Works that still display their original color are more rewarding to view, and will better hold their value in the years to come. ***If you frame up this item with Arader Galleries you can take a 50% discount off the listed price of this work of art.***

      [Bookseller: Arader Galleries San Francisco]
 35.   Check availability:     AbeBooks     Link/Print  


        Festung an von Schiffen befahrenem Gewässer, im Vordergrund sitzend eine zeichnende junge Dame und ein Angler.

      1832 1832 - Aquarell, mit Deckweiß gehöht, über Bleistift, auf chamoisfarbenem Velin, rechts unten signiert und datiert „Mathilde. 1832". 12,1:18,9 cm Kleiner Einriß im linken Rand hinterlegt und mit Lichtrand links. 1833 heiratete die Prinzessin Großherzog Ludwig III. von Hessen und bei Rhein, mit dem sie 1834 nach Darmstadt übersiedelte. Nach ihr wurde die Mathildenhöhe in Darmstadt und die Mathildenterrasse auf dem Kästrich in Mainz benannt. Die Großherzogin war eine Schülerin von D. Quaglio d. J. (1786/1787-1837) und L. Quaglio d. J. (1793-1869) und widmete sich besonders der Porträt-, Landschafts- und Architekturmalerei. Seit 1835 war sie mit der Malerin Julie von Egloffstein befreundet (1792-1869). Auf ihren vielen Reisen nach Hamburg, in die Normandie, nach Mittelitalien, Rom, Neapel, Holland, in die Alpen etc. entstanden zahlreiche Landschaftszeichnungen. Arbeiten der Herzogin tauchen nur vereinzelt im Kunsthandel auf.

      [Bookseller: Galerie Joseph Fach GmbH]
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        Der vollkommene Componist : Harmonische Beispiele und Uebungen des ersten ( und zweiten ) Bandes der Harmonik. ( = Band 1 - 2 )

      - ( Ohne Verlags- Orts- oder Erscheinungsjahr - laut Karlsruher Virtueller Katalog 1832 erschienen und offenbar bei Cosmar & Krause in Berlin erschienen ). Band 1 mit in Kupfer gestochenem Titelblatt und 33 Seiten mit durch C. C. Menzel in Kupfer gestochenen Noten / Band 2 mit gestochenem Titelblatt und den hieran anschließenden in Kupfer gestochenen Noten mit den Seiten 34 - 76 ( so jeweils vollständig ). Jeweils in Halblederbänden der Zeit, Quer4° ( 26 x 34 cm ). Die Halblederbände offenbar etwas später unter Verwendung offenbar der originalen marmorierten Buchdeckel neu aufgebunden. Einbände berieben, gering bestoßen, etwas fleckig und leicht angestaubt. Auf den Vorderdeckeln noch rudimentäre Reste des alten goldgeprägten Deckelschildchens. Innen Seiten durchgehend teils etwas stock- oder braun- oder fingerfleckig, wenige Seiten auch stärker. Ingesamt aber wohlerhalten und dekorativ. ( später erschien zu dem Werk noch ein dritter und vierter Band der hier nicht vorliegt ). Zusammen 2 Bände. - sehr selten - ( Gesamtgewicht 900 Gramm ) ( Pic erhältlich // webimage available ) [Attributes: Hard Cover]

      [Bookseller: Antiquariat Friederichsen]
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        Declaration of Independence, in Congress, July 4, 1776: The Unanimous Declaration of the Thirteen United States of America

      New York: Humphry Phelps and Bele Squire. October, 1832. Letterpress printing on cream paper, text and most decorations in black. With expert restoration, laid on rice paper. Approximately 29.5 x 20.5 inches overall, printed area 24 x 19 inches, or 71 x 48 cms. From the very beginning this document has been ???the??? pivotal document in U. S. history. The Declaration of Independence has been printed many, many times since its original publication in 1776. First as a broadside, then as an important addition in law books. The original of the Declaration [the ???parchment??? copy which was actually signed by Congress] was displayed, often in very poor conditions, and as a consequence suffered damage: the ink flaked and faded, and the parchment became darkened and creased, etc. Two early facsimile printings of the Declaration were made during the second decade of the 19th century: those of Benjamin Owen Tyler (1818) and John Binns (1819). Both facsimiles used decorative and ornamental elements to enhance the text of the Declaration. Richard Rush, who was Acting Secretary of State in 1817, remarked on September 10 of that year about the Tyler copy: "The foregoing copy of the Declaration of Independence has been collated with the original instrument and found correct. I have myself examined the signatures to each. Those executed by Mr. Tyler, are curiously exact imitations, so much so, that it would be difficult, if not impossible, for the closest scrutiny to distinguish them, were it not for the hand of time, from the originals." Rush's reference to "the hand of time" suggests that the signatures were already fading in 1817, only 40 years after they were first affixed to the parchment. One later theory as to why the Declaration was aging so soon after its creation stems from the common 18th-century practice of taking "press copies." Press copies were made by placing a damp sheet of thin paper on a manuscript and pressing it until a portion of the ink was transferred. The thin paper copy was retained in the same manner as a modern carbon copy. The ink was reimposed on a copper plate, which was then etched so that copies could be run off the plate on a press. This "wet transfer" method may have been used by William J. Stone when in 1820 he was commissioned by Secretary of State John Quincy Adams to make a facsimile of the entire Declaration, signatures as well as text. By June 5, 1823, almost exactly 47 years after Jefferson's first draft of the Declaration, the (Washington) National Intelligencer was able to report "that Mr. William J. Stone, a respectable and enterprising Engraver of this City, has, after a labor of three years, completed a fac simile of the original of the Declaration of Independence, now in the archives of the government; that it is executed with the greatest exactness and fidelity; and that the Department of State has become the purchaser of the plate." The copies made from Stone's copperplate established the clear visual image of the Declaration for generations of Americans. The 200 official parchment copies struck from the Stone plate carry the identification "Engraved by W. J. Stone for the Department of State, by order" in the upper left corner followed by "of J. Q. Adams, Sec. of State July 4th 1823." in the upper right corner. "Unofficial" copies that were struck later do not have the identification at the top of the document. Instead the engraver identified his work by engraving "W. J. Stone SC. Washn." near the lower left corner and burnishing out the earlier identification. Since the original Declaration consisted of text and signatures, the later broadsides and lithographs were embellished with borders, vignettes, other decorations, and facsimile signatures. Humphrey Phelps was a map maker in New York, and he together with Bele S. Squire, published a new version of the Declaration in 1832, the same year that Charles Carroll, the last surviving signer of the original Declaration, died. This has the original text and names the signatories in the conventional way, with woodcut illustrations of the American Eagle and the Capitol framing the text, surrounded by elaborate vignettes from the thirteen states with statistical information for each. An elaborate arch with climbing acanthus leaves and topped by the American Eagle is immediately framing the text. Additional vignettes naming the Presidents, reigning Sovereigns, Governors and the National Debt adorn each corner. The whole surrounded by an elaborate border. A very attractive and informative issue [Two copies located by OCLC: Albert Small Collection at University of Virginia, and Yale University].

      [Bookseller: Randall House Rare Books ]
 38.   Check availability:     ABAA     Link/Print  


        Handbuch der Hyppologie oder die Lehre von der Schätzung des Pferdes auf dessen oeconomischen und pecuniären Werth. Nach zeitgemäßen Grund- und Erfahrungssätzen bearbeitet.

      Rackhorst, Osnabrück 1832 - ( Erste Ausgabe ) VIII, 319 Seiten mit 2 gefalteten lithographischen Tafeln, OPappband mit umlaufendem Rotschnitt, 8° ( 18,5 x 11 cm ). Einband stärker berieben, Ecken und Kanten bestoßen. Innen Besitzvermerk von alter Hand auf Vorsatz, einige Seiten etwas fleckig, einige Seiten mit Anstrichen bzw. kleinen Anmerkungen von alter Hand. ( Gewicht 300 Gramm ) ( Pic erhältlich // webimage available ) [Attributes: First Edition; Hard Cover]

      [Bookseller: Antiquariat Friederichsen]
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        Vie de Leonie

      Lyon: Chez Perisse Freres. 1832. First. First edition (of several). 12mo. 232pp. Quarter calf and decorated paper over boards. Early owner's names penciled over, rubbed at the joints and corners, still a tight, very good or better copy. Life of Pierrette-Francoise-Charlotte Leonie. .

      [Bookseller: Between the Covers- Rare Books, Inc. ABA]
 40.   Check availability:     IOBABooks     Link/Print  


        Declaration of Independence, in Congress, July 4, 1776: The Unanimous Declaration of the Thirteen United States of America

      Humphry Phelps and Bele Squire. October, New York 1832 - Approximately 29.5 x 20.5 inches overall, printed area 24 x 19 inches, or 71 x 48 cms. Letterpress printing on cream paper, text and most decorations in black. From the very beginning this document has been "the" pivotal document in U. S. history. The Declaration of Independence has been printed many, many times since its original publication in 1776. First as a broadside, then as an important addition in law books.The original of the Declaration [the "parchment" copy which was actually signed by Congress] was displayed, often in very poor conditions, and as a consequence suffered damage: the ink flaked and faded, and the parchment became darkened and creased, etc. Two early facsimile printings of the Declaration were made during the second decade of the 19th century: those of Benjamin Owen Tyler (1818) and John Binns (1819). Both facsimiles used decorative and ornamental elements to enhance the text of the Declaration. Richard Rush, who was Acting Secretary of State in 1817, remarked on September 10 of that year about the Tyler copy: "The foregoing copy of the Declaration of Independence has been collated with the original instrument and found correct. I have myself examined the signatures to each. Those executed by Mr. Tyler, are curiously exact imitations, so much so, that it would be difficult, if not impossible, for the closest scrutiny to distinguish them, were it not for the hand of time, from the originals." Rush's reference to "the hand of time" suggests that the signatures were already fading in 1817, only 40 years after they were first affixed to the parchment.One later theory as to why the Declaration was aging so soon after its creation stems from the common 18th-century practice of taking "press copies." Press copies were made by placing a damp sheet of thin paper on a manuscript and pressing it until a portion of the ink was transferred. The thin paper copy was retained in the same manner as a modern carbon copy. The ink was reimposed on a copper plate, which was then etched so that copies could be run off the plate on a press. This "wet transfer" method may have been used by William J. Stone when in 1820 he was commissioned by Secretary of State John Quincy Adams to make a facsimile of the entire Declaration, signatures as well as text. By June 5, 1823, almost exactly 47 years after Jefferson's first draft of the Declaration, the (Washington) National Intelligencer was able to report "that Mr. William J. Stone, a respectable and enterprising Engraver of this City, has, after a labor of three years, completed a fac simile of the original of the Declaration of Independence, now in the archives of the government; that it is executed with the greatest exactness and fidelity; and that the Department of State has become the purchaser of the plate."The copies made from Stone's copperplate established the clear visual image of the Declaration for generations of Americans. The 200 official parchment copies struck from the Stone plate carry the identification "Engraved by W. J. Stone for the Department of State, by order" in the upper left corner followed by "of J. Q. Adams, Sec. of State July 4th 1823." in the upper right corner. "Unofficial" copies that were struck later do not have the identification at the top of the document. Instead the engraver identified his work by engraving "W. J. Stone SC. Washn." near the lower left corner and burnishing out the earlier identification.Since the original Declaration consisted of text and signatures, the later broadsides and lithographs were embellished with borders, vignettes, other decorations, and facsimile signatures. Humphrey Phelps was a map maker in New York, and he together with Bele S. Squire, published a new version of the Declaration in 1832, the same year that Charles Carroll, the last surviving signer of the original Declaration, died. This has the original text and names the signatories in the conventional way, with woodcut illustrations of the American Eagle and [Attributes: Signed Copy]

      [Bookseller: Randall House Rare Books (ABAA)]
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        Herta eller Den gavmilde Natur en forberedende Laesebog i Naturhistorien for Ungdommen.

      . Efter Wilmsens tydske Original. Kbhvn. 1832. Med 6 handkolorerede kobberstik. 12mo. 208 s. Samt. hlvldr. med svage brugsspor. * Med Oscar Davidsens exlibris. Eksemplaret har yderligere tilhört Baron Gustav Wedell-Wedellsborg og J. Bille-Brahe..

      [Bookseller: Peter Grosell, Antiquarian Bookseller]
 42.   Check availability:     ZVAB     Link/Print  

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