The viaLibri website requires cookies to work properly. You can find more information in our Terms of Service and Privacy Policy.

Displayed below are some selected recent viaLibri matches for books published in 1804

        [Pears] King Catherine Pear (Catherine Royal); Lemon Pear; Late Petite Muscat; Oignon La Reine; Long stalked Blanquet [Pl. LXXVII]

      [London]: G. Brookshaw, [1804-1812]. Aquatint engraving, with some stipple, printed in colours and finished by hand. Very good condition. 17 3/4 x 13 3/4 inches. 21 3/4 x 18 1/8 inches. A fine image from Brookshaw's masterpiece: 'Pomona Britannica; or, A Collection of the Most Esteemed Fruits'. George Brookshaw's 'Pomona Britannica' is the finest work on fruit and flowers ever produced. Its breathtaking images display a level of technical virtuosity and beauty that distinguish this magnificent book as a true work of art. As a retired cabinetmaker, Brookshaw produced his seminal botanical study late in his career, at first publishing it in parts and then as a complete edition in 1812. The fact that this outstanding work took ten years to complete is evident in the quality of its images and the care with which Brookshaw executed each individual picture. 'Pomona Britannica' was produced as a visual record of the best available varieties of fruit in an attempt to encourage gardeners to experiment with growing fruit, and illustrates examples found in the Royal gardens at Hampton Court, Kensington Gardens, and the private gardens of the Prince of Wales in Blackheath. 'Pomona Britannica' differs from other botanical books in its dark aquatinted backgrounds and its stylized compositions. By using aquatint to create a contrasting background, Brookshaw manages to produce a truly dramatic effect. His use of stylized composition distinguishes his pictures from the dry scientific illustrations found in other botanical studies and creates an exceptionally beautiful visual experience. 'Pomona Britannica' is not only a didactic study, it is a masterpiece of illustration in which every picture is a testament to the artist's talent and ingenuity. Cf. Dunthorne 50; cf. Great Flower Books (1990) p. 81; cf. Nissen BBI 244; cf. Sandra Raphael An Oak Spring Pomona 40a.

      [Bookseller: Donald Heald Rare Books]
 1.   Check availability:     Biblio     Link/Print  


        An Inquiry Into the Nature and Origin of Public Wealth : and Into the Means and Causes of its Increase / by the Earl of Lauderdale

      Edinburgh : Printed For Arch. Constable & Co. ; London : T. N. Longman & O. Rees, 1804. 1st Edition. Physical desc. : [1-8] 1-482 [483-488] p. ; 22 cm; folding table. Subject: Economics. Wealth. Early Political Economy. Notes: Signatures: 4 p. [? ]. , A-Ggp8s, Hhp4s (first four leaves of each signature signed; 2Hh folds out to c. A. 32 x 27 cm. ) . Referenced by: OCLC 15814475. Goldsmiths'-Kress library of economic literature, no. 18801. Finely bound in modern aniline calf over marble boards. Raised bands with the title blocked direct in gilt. An exceptional copy - scans and additional bibliographic detail on request.

      [Bookseller: MW Books Ltd.]
 2.   Check availability:     Biblio     Link/Print  


        KALENDARIO MANUAL Y GUIA DE FORASTEROS EN MADRID, para el año de 1804.

      - Madrid; Imprenta Real, 1804. 16º (11 cm.) Retrato de Carlos III y Maria Luisa., 216 p. = 234 p. (Estado militar). Encuadernación en pasta española con orla dorada en el lomo. Buen estado, leves rozes en la encuadernación. Revisado completo. Año: 1804

      [Bookseller: LIBRERIA MARGARITA DE DIOS]
 3.   Check availability:     IberLibro     Link/Print  


        Catalogue des Livres rares et précieux, et des Manuscrits, composant la Bibliothèque de M***,

      dont la Vente se fera le Jeudi 22 Germinal (12 Avril 1804) et jours suivans... xii, 320, [4] pp. 8vo, cont. speckled calf (rather nicely rebacked with the orig. red morocco label laid-down), double gilt fillet round sides, spine gilt. Paris: G. De Bure père et fils, 1804. An important sale, containing a large portion of books from the famous De Boze collection. De Boze's library was acquired in 1753 before the scheduled auction jointly by Cotte (1721-1804), Président au Parlement de Paris, and Charles Robert Boutin, Maître des Requêtes, for the sum of 83,000 livres. They, in turn, sold most of the fifteenth-century books, reputedly for 80,000 livres, to Louis-Jean Gaignat, except for the Gutenberg Bible, of which he probably already owned a copy. Cotte and Boutin then divided up among themselves the books they wished to keep, and sold the remainder by auction through Martin in 1754. This was one of the great and most highly anticipated sales of the period which dispersed a very large portion of the legendary De Boze collection formed more than fifty years before. The sale was an enormous success and Didot was a major buyer. Cotte made his first important purchases at Count d'Hoym's sale in 1738. Fine copy with the four-page schedule of sale at end. 2422 lots plus two further numbered lots and one lot of three dozen skins of red morocco. Pages [308]-320 list another ca. 180 lots of manuscripts. Priced throughout in a contemporary hand. This catalogue is rare; I have not had a copy before. ❧ Gustave Brunet, Dictionnaire de Bibliologie Catholique, col. 439-"Les classiques grecs et et latins y dominent. Belles éditions et exemplaires de choix payés alors à des prix qu'on ne retrouverait plus aujourd-hui." Guigard, II, pp. 162-63. Peignot, p. 91-"Catalogue intéressant; beaucoup d'articles se sont vendu exorbitamment cher." .

      [Bookseller: Jonathan A. Hill, Bookseller, Inc.]
 4.   Check availability:     Biblio     Link/Print  


        [GEOGRAPHIA ANTIQUA: BEING A COMPLETE SETT OF MAPS OF ANTIENT GEOGRAPHY]

      [London]: [Rivington], [1804]. Disbound. The maps are quite clean but with offsetting. One map has a small, dark stain toward the top. Very Good. Small quarto (8-1/4" x 10"), disbound, with one original board present. Lacking the title page but with the table of contents and all 33 double-page maps present. The first 20 were engraved by Richard William Seale; William Henry Toms engraved the remainder. None of the maps is colored, and most measure about 12" x 8-1/4" on 15" x 10" pages. Apparently Seale issued these beginning about 1731, and they continued in print until about 1819. The paper is watermarked 1804. Christoph Cellarius (1638-1707) was a German classicist and geographer who was an early advocate of using maps to illustrate his publications. His most notable publication was Geographia Antiqua... (1686), and it was reissued throughout the next century and a half in various forms. Apparently the combination of maps varied for different editions. Most of the maps in this edition are the classical ones: the Roman Empire, ancient Greece, Macedonia, Palestine, etc.

      [Bookseller: Charles Agvent]
 5.   Check availability:     Biblio     Link/Print  


        Phaethornis Pygmaeus, Pl. 42 (Swallow-tail)

      John Gould (1804-1881) was an English ornithologist, self-taught artist and naturalist. Gould first worked as a gardener under his father in the Royal Gardens of Windsor from 1818-1824, where he began his illustrations. He became an expert taxidermist, opening his own practice in London in 1824 and in 1827 he became the first Curator and Preserver at the museum of the Zoological Society of London.Through his work he was able to meet with the country?s leading naturalists and view new collections of birds given to the Zoological Society. His interest in birds was continually developing and in 1830 he published his first volume on birds, ?A Century of Birds From the Himalaya Mountains.? For the next fifty years, Gould, his wife and artists working with them traveled around Asia, the East Indies and Australia. His wife Elizabeth and other artists were able to transfer his sketches to stone; hand print and hand-color them.Of all his works, many of Gould?s best-known images come from this beautiful and comprehensive ?Monograph of the Trochilidae, or Family of Hummingbirds?. One of his largest productions, the Hummingbirds was also the most painstaking, meticulously detailed project that the ornithologist attempted. In order to create accurate representations of the tiny, delicately beautiful birds, Gould invented a new method of coloring, using metallic pigments to reproduce the iridescence of their plumage. Most images also show at least one subject in flight to further accentuate the coloring of their feathers. All of the hummingbirds are drawn to scale and are anatomically correct to the smallest detail, their brilliant coloring highlighted with gold and transparent luster. Most of the subjects in the book were taken from Gould?s personal collection of hummingbird specimens.This magnificently hand-colored lithograph, "Phaethornis Pygmaeus", measures 21.75" x 15" and is in excellent condition with a few light foxing marks. These hummingbirds, also known as Pygmy Hermits or Reddish Hermits, are colored with reddish undersides, green wings and patterned tail-feathers. Precise lines define and detail each feather, giving these hummingbirds dimension and their positioning, one in the nest and one outside, show their small size and add to this dynamic composition.

      [Bookseller: Arader Galleries]
 6.   Check availability:     Biblio     Link/Print  


        MÈmoire sur le nouveau genre Pyrosoma

      Paris,: An XII, that is, 1804.. Quarto, hand-coloured plate and 10 pp.; some toning, but an excellent copy in modern marbled paper wrappers. Very rare indeed: the first printing of one of PÈron's earliest scientific articles based on his work during the Baudin voyage.In 1804, newly returned from the voyage, PÈron was living in Paris, where he and Lesueur began work on the official Baudin account. He had been resigned to the fact that by sending many of his specimens home, the scientific descriptions of a great number fell to important figures like Cuvier and Jussieu. On his return, however, he pressed on to publish several essays of his own, and one of the first was this essay on "Pyrosoma", bioluminescent organisms common to warm waters (from the Greek pyro "fire", soma "body"). His work on unheralded sea creatures like pyrosoma was the product of his tremendous collecting enthusiasm; he and Lesueur had been overwhelmed and delighted with the myriad different oceanic species they had discovered during the voyage, and later commented that 'their number and diversity afforded an inexhaustible fund of pleasure, and were the subject of philosophical enthusiasm' (quoted in Duyker, FranÁois PÈron, p. 87).'PÈron's work on jellyfish would ultimately include pioneering observations of their anatomy and physiology, and the collection of many previously undescribed species' (Duyker, p. 64). It was for this reason that the various mollusca and zoophytes he collected were so beautifully illustrated in the official account: the subject of the present article, the Pyrosoma atlanticum, was later figured at the upper left corner of plate 30 of the Atlas. The species is also, interestingly, one of only a handful to now be named after PÈron, as its official nomenclature has since been updated to Pyrosoma atlanticum PÈron, 1804.Any separate scientific publication relating to the voyage is a rarity: very few indeed survive, probably because of the limited audience to which they were distributed. Although not noted here, this article was published the same year in Annales du MusÈum national d'Histoire naturelle (pp. 437-46); this does confirm, however, that the present article, newly paginated, is a proper offprint rather than simply an extract from the museum journal. Such offprints, where they exist, are recognised as the original editions since they normally precede the journal printing and were typically done in very limited numbers for the author to distribute.

      [Bookseller: Hordern House Rare Books]
 7.   Check availability:     Biblio     Link/Print  


        White-Fronted Goose, Anser albifrons; Steph

      This splendid hand-colored, folio-size lithograph, "White-Fronted Goose, Anser albifrons; Steph", from John Gould?s (1804-1881) monumental book "Birds Europe" (1832-1837) is in very good condition with light foxing and a small pencil mark on the lower right corner. Measuring 14" x 21", this lithograph magnificently displays the author?s scientific skill and attention to detail. These geese are expertly hand-colored and finely detailed. The goose in the goose in the foreground has a taupe colored body, with white and gray accenting on the back and wings and black spots on its belly. The goose in the background is colored in rich taupe with gray and white highlighting. Each geese has a white face and colored beak tip. Precise lines define and detail each feather, giving these birds great dimension and naturalistic qualities.John Gould was an English ornithologist, self-taught artist and naturalist. Gould first worked as a gardener under his father in the Royal Gardens of Windsor from 1818-1824, where he began his illustrations. He became an expert taxidermist, opening his own practice in London in 1824 and in 1827 he became the first Curator and Preserver at the museum of the Zoological Society of London. Through his work he was able to meet with the country?s leading naturalists and view new collections of birds given to the Zoological Society. His interest in birds was continually developing and in 1830 he published his first volume on birds, ?A Century of Birds From the Himalaya Mountains.? For the next fifty years, Gould, his wife and artists working with them traveled around Asia, the East Indies and Australia. His wife Elizabeth and other artists were able to transfer his sketches to stone; hand print and hand-color them.One of the most accomplished and engaging natural history works of the 19th century, ?The Birds of Europe? was also the first of Gould's works to feature plates by Edward Lear. A total of sixty-eight images bear Lear's name, and they are among the most remarkable bird drawings ever made. Lear endowed his illustrations with some measure of his own whimsy and intelligence, and his style is at once fluidly spontaneous and realistically precise.In this way, the images of ?The Birds of Europe? are amazingly distinctive, while also highly realistic. Gould undertook this work partly in an effort to redress the imbalance between the study of local and foreign ornithology. Gould portrayed birds native to Europe in a manner that had only been thought appropriate for the colorful species of distant places. In this way he managed to draw much popular interest back to native birds, which were suddenly considered equally beautiful to exotic species.

      [Bookseller: Arader Galleries]
 8.   Check availability:     Biblio     Link/Print  


        Oxypogon Lindenii, Plate 183 (Linden?s Helmet-crest)

      John Gould (1804-1881) was an English ornithologist, self-taught artist and naturalist. Gould first worked as a gardener under his father in the Royal Gardens of Windsor from 1818-1824, where he began his illustrations. He became an expert taxidermist, opening his own practice in London in 1824 and in 1827 he became the first Curator and Preserver at the museum of the Zoological Society of London.Through his work he was able to meet with the country?s leading naturalists and view new collections of birds given to the Zoological Society. His interest in birds was continually developing and in 1830 he published his first volume on birds, ?A Century of Birds From the Himalaya Mountains.? For the next fifty years, Gould, his wife and artists working with them traveled around Asia, the East Indies and Australia. His wife Elizabeth and other artists were able to transfer his sketches to stone; hand print and hand-color them. Of all his works, many of Gould?s best-known images come from this beautiful and comprehensive ?Monograph of the Trochilidae, or Family of Hummingbirds?.One of his largest productions, the Hummingbirds was also the most painstaking, meticulously detailed project that the ornithologist attempted. In order to create accurate representations of the tiny, delicately beautiful birds, Gould invented a new method of coloring, using metallic pigments to reproduce the iridescence of their plumage. Most images also show at least one subject in flight to further accentuate the coloring of their feathers. All of the hummingbirds are drawn to scale and are anatomically correct to the smallest detail, their brilliant coloring highlighted with gold and transparent luster. Most of the subjects in the book were taken from Gould?s personal collection of hummingbird specimens.This magnificently hand-colored lithograph, "Oxypogon Lindenii", measures 21.75" x 15" and is in very good condition with light foxing marks throughout. This lithograph shows the three hummingbirds, commonly called Linden's Helmet-crests, interacting with each other while resting on some branches. These dynamic hummingbirds are expertly hand-colored with rich green bodies, large, white-striped tail feathers, and purple-grey wings. The juvenile has a white spotted underside, while the adults have while necks, chins and black and white crests rising above their heads. The hummingbirds are illustrated resting on a finely colored branch with rich green leaves and delicate pink flowers.

      [Bookseller: Arader Galleries]
 9.   Check availability:     Biblio     Link/Print  


        Phaethornis Hispidus, Gould, Plate 22 (Hairy Hermit)

      John Gould (1804-1881) was an English ornithologist, self-taught artist and naturalist. Gould first worked as a gardener under his father in the Royal Gardens of Windsor from 1818-1824, where he began his illustrations. He became an expert taxidermist, opening his own practice in London in 1824 and in 1827 he became the first Curator and Preserver at the museum of the Zoological Society of London.Through his work he was able to meet with the country?s leading naturalists and view new collections of birds given to the Zoological Society. His interest in birds was continually developing and in 1830 he published his first volume on birds, ?A Century of Birds From the Himalaya Mountains.? For the next fifty years, Gould, his wife and artists working with them traveled around Asia, the East Indies and Australia. His wife Elizabeth and other artists were able to transfer his sketches to stone; hand print and hand-color them.Of all his works, many of Gould?s best-known images come from this beautiful and comprehensive ?Monograph of the Trochilidae, or Family of Hummingbirds?. One of his largest productions, the Hummingbirds was also the most painstaking, meticulously detailed project that the ornithologist attempted. In order to create accurate representations of the tiny, delicately beautiful birds, Gould invented a new method of coloring, using metallic pigments to reproduce the iridescence of their plumage. Most images also show at least one subject in flight to further accentuate the coloring of their feathers. All of the hummingbirds are drawn to scale and are anatomically correct to the smallest detail, their brilliant coloring highlighted with gold and transparent luster. Most of the subjects in the book were taken from Gould?s personal collection of hummingbird specimens.This magnificently hand-colored lithograph, "Phaethornis Hispidus, Gould", measures 21" x 14" and is in excellent condition. This lithograph shows the two hummingbirds, commonly called Hairy Hermits, in search of nectar to feed on. These large hummingbirds are expertly hand-colored with rich green backs, pale blue undersides and wingtips and a blend of green and blue patterned tail feathers with white tips. The are illustrated with their long, thin breaks reaching for nectar from delicate white flowers. The positioning of the bodies of the hummingbirds allows for their dynamic coloring and patterns to be appreciated.

      [Bookseller: Arader Galleries]
 10.   Check availability:     Biblio     Link/Print  

______________________________________________________________________________


      Home     Wants Manager     Library Search     562 Years   Links     Contact      Search Help      Terms of Service      Privacy     


Copyright © 2018 viaLibri™ Limited. All rights reserved.