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Displayed below are some selected recent viaLibri matches for books published in 1804

        Selasphorus Heloisa, Pl. 141 (Heloisa?s Flame-bearer)

      John Gould (1804-1881) was an English ornithologist, self-taught artist and naturalist. Gould first worked as a gardener under his father in the Royal Gardens of Windsor from 1818-1824, where he began his illustrations. He became an expert taxidermist, opening his own practice in London in 1824 and in 1827 he became the first Curator and Preserver at the museum of the Zoological Society of London.Through his work he was able to meet with the country?s leading naturalists and view new collections of birds given to the Zoological Society. His interest in birds was continually developing and in 1830 he published his first volume on birds, ?A Century of Birds From the Himalaya Mountains.? For the next fifty years, Gould, his wife and artists working with them traveled around Asia, the East Indies and Australia. His wife Elizabeth and other artists were able to transfer his sketches to stone; hand print and hand-color them.Of all his works, many of Gould?s best-known images come from this beautiful and comprehensive ?Monograph of the Trochilidae, or Family of Hummingbirds?. One of his largest productions, the Hummingbirds was also the most painstaking, meticulously detailed project that the ornithologist attempted. In order to create accurate representations of the tiny, delicately beautiful birds, Gould invented a new method of coloring, using metallic pigments to reproduce the iridescence of their plumage. Most images also show at least one subject in flight to further accentuate the coloring of their feathers. All of the hummingbirds are drawn to scale and are anatomically correct to the smallest detail, their brilliant coloring highlighted with gold and transparent luster. Most of the subjects in the book were taken from Gould?s personal collection of hummingbird specimens.This magnificently hand-colored lithograph, "Selasphorus Heloisa", measures 21.75" x 15" and is in excellent condition with a few light foxing marks. This lithograph shows the three hummingbirds, commonly called Heloisa's Flame-bearers, in diffident positions. These hummingbirds are expertly hand-colored with rich green heads and white undersides, and wings with brown, white and yellow accenting. The adult hummingbirds have vibrant magenta throats, which are given a luminous sheen through the use of metallic gum arabic. These hummingbirds are pictured with a delicate orchid flower, with lush green leaves and delicate yellow flowers.

      [Bookseller: Arader Galleries]
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        Oxypogon Lindenii, Plate 183 (Linden?s Helmet-crest)

      John Gould (1804-1881) was an English ornithologist, self-taught artist and naturalist. Gould first worked as a gardener under his father in the Royal Gardens of Windsor from 1818-1824, where he began his illustrations. He became an expert taxidermist, opening his own practice in London in 1824 and in 1827 he became the first Curator and Preserver at the museum of the Zoological Society of London.Through his work he was able to meet with the country?s leading naturalists and view new collections of birds given to the Zoological Society. His interest in birds was continually developing and in 1830 he published his first volume on birds, ?A Century of Birds From the Himalaya Mountains.? For the next fifty years, Gould, his wife and artists working with them traveled around Asia, the East Indies and Australia. His wife Elizabeth and other artists were able to transfer his sketches to stone; hand print and hand-color them. Of all his works, many of Gould?s best-known images come from this beautiful and comprehensive ?Monograph of the Trochilidae, or Family of Hummingbirds?.One of his largest productions, the Hummingbirds was also the most painstaking, meticulously detailed project that the ornithologist attempted. In order to create accurate representations of the tiny, delicately beautiful birds, Gould invented a new method of coloring, using metallic pigments to reproduce the iridescence of their plumage. Most images also show at least one subject in flight to further accentuate the coloring of their feathers. All of the hummingbirds are drawn to scale and are anatomically correct to the smallest detail, their brilliant coloring highlighted with gold and transparent luster. Most of the subjects in the book were taken from Gould?s personal collection of hummingbird specimens.This magnificently hand-colored lithograph, "Oxypogon Lindenii", measures 21.75" x 15" and is in very good condition with light foxing marks throughout. This lithograph shows the three hummingbirds, commonly called Linden's Helmet-crests, interacting with each other while resting on some branches. These dynamic hummingbirds are expertly hand-colored with rich green bodies, large, white-striped tail feathers, and purple-grey wings. The juvenile has a white spotted underside, while the adults have while necks, chins and black and white crests rising above their heads. The hummingbirds are illustrated resting on a finely colored branch with rich green leaves and delicate pink flowers.

      [Bookseller: Arader Galleries]
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        Phaethornis Hispidus, Gould, Plate 22 (Hairy Hermit)

      John Gould (1804-1881) was an English ornithologist, self-taught artist and naturalist. Gould first worked as a gardener under his father in the Royal Gardens of Windsor from 1818-1824, where he began his illustrations. He became an expert taxidermist, opening his own practice in London in 1824 and in 1827 he became the first Curator and Preserver at the museum of the Zoological Society of London.Through his work he was able to meet with the country?s leading naturalists and view new collections of birds given to the Zoological Society. His interest in birds was continually developing and in 1830 he published his first volume on birds, ?A Century of Birds From the Himalaya Mountains.? For the next fifty years, Gould, his wife and artists working with them traveled around Asia, the East Indies and Australia. His wife Elizabeth and other artists were able to transfer his sketches to stone; hand print and hand-color them.Of all his works, many of Gould?s best-known images come from this beautiful and comprehensive ?Monograph of the Trochilidae, or Family of Hummingbirds?. One of his largest productions, the Hummingbirds was also the most painstaking, meticulously detailed project that the ornithologist attempted. In order to create accurate representations of the tiny, delicately beautiful birds, Gould invented a new method of coloring, using metallic pigments to reproduce the iridescence of their plumage. Most images also show at least one subject in flight to further accentuate the coloring of their feathers. All of the hummingbirds are drawn to scale and are anatomically correct to the smallest detail, their brilliant coloring highlighted with gold and transparent luster. Most of the subjects in the book were taken from Gould?s personal collection of hummingbird specimens.This magnificently hand-colored lithograph, "Phaethornis Hispidus, Gould", measures 21" x 14" and is in excellent condition. This lithograph shows the two hummingbirds, commonly called Hairy Hermits, in search of nectar to feed on. These large hummingbirds are expertly hand-colored with rich green backs, pale blue undersides and wingtips and a blend of green and blue patterned tail feathers with white tips. The are illustrated with their long, thin breaks reaching for nectar from delicate white flowers. The positioning of the bodies of the hummingbirds allows for their dynamic coloring and patterns to be appreciated.

      [Bookseller: Arader Galleries]
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        Klais Guimeti, Plate 7 (Guimet?s Flutterer)

      John Gould (1804-1881) was an English ornithologist, self-taught artist and naturalist. Gould first worked as a gardener under his father in the Royal Gardens of Windsor from 1818-1824, where he began his illustrations. He became an expert taxidermist, opening his own practice in London in 1824 and in 1827 he became the first Curator and Preserver at the museum of the Zoological Society of London.Through his work he was able to meet with the country?s leading naturalists and view new collections of birds given to the Zoological Society. His interest in birds was continually developing and in 1830 he published his first volume on birds, ?A Century of Birds From the Himalaya Mountains.? For the next fifty years, Gould, his wife and artists working with them traveled around Asia, the East Indies and Australia. His wife Elizabeth and other artists were able to transfer his sketches to stone; hand print and hand-color them.Of all his works, many of Gould?s best-known images come from this beautiful and comprehensive ?Monograph of the Trochilidae, or Family of Hummingbirds?. One of his largest productions, the Hummingbirds was also the most painstaking, meticulously detailed project that the ornithologist attempted. In order to create accurate representations of the tiny, delicately beautiful birds, Gould invented a new method of coloring, using metallic pigments to reproduce the iridescence of their plumage. Most images also show at least one subject in flight to further accentuate the coloring of their feathers. All of the hummingbirds are drawn to scale and are anatomically correct to the smallest detail, their brilliant coloring highlighted with gold and transparent luster. Most of the subjects in the book were taken from Gould?s personal collection of hummingbird specimens.This magnificently hand-colored lithograph, "Klais Guimeti", measures 21.75" x 15" and is in excellent condition. This lithograph shows the two hummingbirds, commonly called Guimet's Flutterer's, resting on some branches. These dynamic hummingbirds are expertly hand-colored with rich green bodies and lighter undersides. The bird in the foreground has a more colorful body with deep indigo colored head. The smaller bird in the background has a lighter underside with a blue-green forehead and white win-tips on its tail feathers. The birds are perched on a finely colored and well detailed tree branch with green leaves.

      [Bookseller: Arader Galleries]
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        Phaethornis Intermedius, Plate 30 (Middle Sized Hermit)

      John Gould (1804-1881) was an English ornithologist, self-taught artist and naturalist. Gould first worked as a gardener under his father in the Royal Gardens of Windsor from 1818-1824, where he began his illustrations. He became an expert taxidermist, opening his own practice in London in 1824 and in 1827 he became the first Curator and Preserver at the museum of the Zoological Society of London.Through his work he was able to meet with the country?s leading naturalists and view new collections of birds given to the Zoological Society. His interest in birds was continually developing and in 1830 he published his first volume on birds, ?A Century of Birds From the Himalaya Mountains.? For the next fifty years, Gould, his wife and artists working with them traveled around Asia, the East Indies and Australia. His wife Elizabeth and other artists were able to transfer his sketches to stone; hand print and hand-color them. Of all his works, many of Gould?s best-known images come from this beautiful and comprehensive ?Monograph of the Trochilidae, or Family of Hummingbirds?.One of his largest productions, the Hummingbirds was also the most painstaking, meticulously detailed project that the ornithologist attempted. In order to create accurate representations of the tiny, delicately beautiful birds, Gould invented a new method of coloring, using metallic pigments to reproduce the iridescence of their plumage. Most images also show at least one subject in flight to further accentuate the coloring of their feathers. All of the hummingbirds are drawn to scale and are anatomically correct to the smallest detail, their brilliant coloring highlighted with gold and transparent luster. Most of the subjects in the book were taken from Gould?s personal collection of hummingbird specimens.This magnificently hand-colored lithograph, "Phaethornis Intermedius", measures 21.75" x 15" and is in excellent condition. This lithograph shows two hummingbirds, commonly called Middle Sized Hermits, resting on delicate green plants. These hummingbirds are expertly hand-colored with rich green backs and brown undersides with white and black freckled necks and tails. they have white accented wingtips and long, orange accents on their beaks and eyebrows. Their dynamic positioning allows for their back and underside patterning to be appreciated.

      [Bookseller: Arader Galleries]
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        Microchera Parvirostris, Lawr, Plate 30 (Purple Snowcap)

      John Gould (1804-1881) was an English ornithologist, self-taught artist and naturalist. Gould first worked as a gardener under his father in the Royal Gardens of Windsor from 1818-1824, where he began his illustrations. He became an expert taxidermist, opening his own practice in London in 1824 and in 1827 he became the first Curator and Preserver at the museum of the Zoological Society of London.Through his work he was able to meet with the country?s leading naturalists and view new collections of birds given to the Zoological Society. His interest in birds was continually developing and in 1830 he published his first volume on birds, ?A Century of Birds From the Himalaya Mountains.? For the next fifty years, Gould, his wife and artists working with them traveled around Asia, the East Indies and Australia. His wife Elizabeth and other artists were able to transfer his sketches to stone; hand print and hand-color them.Of all his works, many of Gould?s best-known images come from this beautiful and comprehensive ?Monograph of the Trochilidae, or Family of Hummingbirds?. One of his largest productions, the Hummingbirds was also the most painstaking, meticulously detailed project that the ornithologist attempted. In order to create accurate representations of the tiny, delicately beautiful birds, Gould invented a new method of coloring, using metallic pigments to reproduce the iridescence of their plumage. Most images also show at least one subject in flight to further accentuate the coloring of their feathers. All of the hummingbirds are drawn to scale and are anatomically correct to the smallest detail, their brilliant coloring highlighted with gold and transparent luster. Most of the subjects in the book were taken from Gould?s personal collection of hummingbird specimens.This magnificently hand-colored lithograph, "Microchera Parvirostris, Lawr", measures 21.75" x 15" and is in excellent condition. This lithograph shows the four hummingbirds, commonly called Purple Snowcaps, resting on a large green leaf. The hummingbirds are expertly-hand colored and show the differences between the mature adult and juvenile birds who lack the "snowcap". The hummingbirds are colored in a blend of green, purple, brown and white, the youngest with more green on its back and a white underside. The snowcaps of the adult birds are vibrantly colored against their rich, dark bodies. The reflections of a bird and the leaf are seen in the water as it bends down for a drink, adding to the dynamic composition of this lithograph.

      [Bookseller: Arader Galleries]
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        Views in Egypt, Palestine and other parts of the Ottoman Empire [general title]

      London: printed by T. Bensley for R. Bowyer, 1804 [text and plates watermarked 1801]. 3 parts in 1, folio. (18 1/4 x 12 1/2 inches). General title, 4 section titles (one part with 2 section titles in English and French, respectively). 96 hand-coloured aquatint plates. Expertly bound to style in dark green morocco over contemporary marbled paper covered boards, flat spine in six compartments, lettered in the second compartment, the others with a repeat decoration in gilt. [Comprised of:] Views in Egypt from the Original Drawings in the Possession of Sir Robert Ainslie, taken during his Embassy to Constantinople. London, 1801. Text in English. 48 hand-coloured aquatint plates after Mayer, all captioned in English. [With:] Views in Palestine, from the Original Drawings of Luigi Mayer, with an Historical and Descriptive Account of the Country and its Remarkable Places ... Vues en Palestine ... London, 1804. Title and text in English and French. 24 hand-coloured aquatint plates after Mayer, all captioned in English and French. [With:] Views in the Ottoman Empire, chiefly in Caramania, a part of Asia Minor hitherto unexplored; with some curious selections from the Islands of Rhodes and Cyprus, and the celebrated cities of Corinth, Carthage and Tripoli: from the original drawings in the possession of Sir R. Ainslie, taken during his embassy to Constantinople by ... Mayer: with historical observations and incidental illustrations of the manners and customs of the natives of the country ... Vues dans l'empire Ottoman. London: 1803. 2 letterpress titles: one in English, one in French, text in English and French. 24 hand-coloured aquatint plates after Mayer, all captioned in English and French. Rare combined issue of Mayer's spectacular works with remarkable colour plates. Each work was published under the auspices of Sir Robert Ainslie (1730- 1812), antiquary, numismatist, and ambassador to Constantinople from 1776 to 1792. The plates include many remarkable images. The first work includes breathtaking views from the top of the Great Pyramid at Gizeh, the second and third pyramids at Gizeh, and a very detailed illustration of the Nilometer, an ancient device which measured the height of the Nile. (Egypt's agricultural economy depended almost entirely on the annual flooding of the land by the Nile and the Turkish rulers of Egypt used the Nilometer to judge how good a season their subjects were going to have and thus how much, if any, taxes could be levied). The second work contains a series of 10 views taken in and around Jerusalem, as well as a number of other locations known from passages in the Bible. The third work concentrates on Caramania in Asiatic Turkey, including views of the ancient sites as well as ethnographical portraits of the inhabitants. It also includes images of Rhodes, Corinth, Carthage and Tripoli. As the titles make clear, the plates are based upon the designs of Luigi Mayer, an Italian-born artist of German parentage. Abbey Travel 369; Atabey 787 & 788; Blackmer 1098 & 1099; Gay 2145; Rohricht p. 339; Colas I, 2018; Hardie p.141; Hiler p.577

      [Bookseller: Donald Heald Rare Books]
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        [AUTOGRAPH MANUSCRIPT, TOGETHER WITH AN AUTOGRAPH LETTER, SIGNED, ADDRESSED TO LORD MELVILLE CONCERNING POSSIBLE ACTIONS TO BE TAKEN IN THE EVENT OF WAR WITH SPAIN]

      Granton, Edinburgh. Oct. 22, 1804.. 12; 2pp. Quarto letter, folio memorandum. Old fold lines to both. Minor wear and soiling. Very good. A fascinating memorandum entitled "Hints as to the Conduct of this Country, in the Event of a Spanish War," together with the accompanying cover letter, written by Scottish MP Charles Hope to Lord Melville. The memorandum presents a clear outline of a detailed scheme for English commercial advancement, under the guise of a war with Spain. The object is two-fold, first to gain lucrative trade opportunities in South American and the South Seas; secondly to compromise the power of the French empire and gain international commercial advantage over France while gaining favor with Spain and colonies in the Americas in the peace that will follow. At the time of writing this assessment and strategy, Hope was a Member of Parliament for Edinburgh, appointed Lord Advocate, and also serving as Lord Justice Clerk. In his cover letter, Hope writes: "Founded on the conversation we had on the conduct of the war, on our journey to London last year, I now send you a sketch of the conduct which I think this country ought to follow in our hostilities with Spain. The general ideas, I know, coincide with your own, & if any one hint of mine as to the detail can be of use, I am satisfied. I am so convinced of the immense advantages which will result to this country, if some such plan is adopted, if I were unmarried I would cheerfully renounce my other prospects & go out as Commercial Envoy with the Southern Armament." Hope's well thought-out memorandum proposes specific strategies, mentions desired commodities, and stresses the necessity for developing and maintaining peaceful alliances. He also presents for consideration the long- term results of the Spanish Conquest of Mexico and Peru to form a superior strategy to gain commercial supremacy over unsuspecting nations. A calculated formation of war strategy with trade interests at its core, the content is provocative, persuading, unadulterated, and reflective of the very design of war. The document opens by remarking that Spain seems an unwilling adversary, pressured into war by France. "Therefore if we go to was with Spain, I think it is not our interest to humble & weaken Spain. The more she is humbled & weakened, the more decidedly she must in future become subservient to the views of France...." He writes that conquering Spanish colonies is not the route to take, as England proved with her own American colonies. The real key is having English access to trade, rather than control over the government of the colony itself: "I would therefore make a Spanish war, if we must have one...entirely subservient to the opportunity of laying open the trade of the Spanish colonies on the continent of America. If we can accomplish this, it will open sources of commerce, & create a demand for our manufactures, which would soon compensate for any restrictions which the power of France on the continent may be able to perpetuate at the Peace. It will give us a great part of the bullion of America, without bringing with it the evils which Spain experiences from the possession of the riches of Mexico & Peru. To us the gold & silver of those countries will flow in the natural & beneficial channels of Industry & Commerce. They will come as the returns, & again act as the means of encouraging our manufactures...." He continues, writing that as they cannot rescue European Spain from France's power and influence, they should "consider her so far our enemy as to capture her Marine, & destroy her commerce as much as possible, so as to render her assistance of the least possible use to France, & her commerce the means of encouraging & enriching our own seamen, who against France, will meet only with hard blows & hardships." He reiterates that the colonies should be left relatively unmolested, to govern themselves as usual. He then goes on to expound on individual colonies and the gains that England can find in them. "Those in the West Indies, such as the Havannah, Carthagena, Porto Bello, &c. are of little use except as stations & stages for carrying on the regulated & circuitous commerce between Spain & her colonies on the main. The capture of them would distress Spain, with little benefit to ourselves. Besides, they are all very strong places, & would cost much blood & expence to take & keep them, & would infallibly be restored at the Peace. ... Instead, therefore, of expeditions for capturing the Spanish colonies, I would fit out commercial armaments, if I may use the phrase, for the purpose of opening a direct trade with the Spanish Main. ... I would on the Eastern coast of America, possess ourselves of Vera Cruz in the Gulf of Mexico & I would hold this mainly as a Factory, leaving as much as possible the people in possession of their property, government, religion, & prejudices. This port would open to us a direct trade with the whole empire of Mexico, & if we conduct ourselves there at first with good faith, & a proper regard for the interests of the people, they will never suffer us to be excluded & will infallibly shake off the Spanish yoke, if that should be stipulated at the Peace." He lays down similar plans for South America, going into extensive detail as to how to proceed. Charles Hope (1763-1851) was a Scottish politician and judge. The eldest son of John Hope, he studied law at Edinburgh University. He was admitted as an advocate in 1784 and was appointed sheriff of Orkney in 1792. He was a Member of Parliament for Edinburgh from 1803 to 1805, and was appointed Lord Advocate from 1801 to 1804. He was raised to the bench as Lord Granton and held the office of Lord Justice Clerk from 1804 to 1811. That year he was promoted to be Lord President of Court of Sessions, an office he essentially held until 1841. Appointed a Privy Counsellor in 1822, Hope was also an active Colonel of the Edinburgh volunteers. He lived in the Granton area of Edinburgh.

      [Bookseller: William Reese Company - Americana]
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        The Edinburgh Review

      91 - Edinburgh - Printed by Ballantyne and Co. for Longman, Rees, Orme, Brown and Green, 1804 Book. Very Good. Hardcover. First edition. An extensive collection of the Victorian publication The Edinburgh Review. Containing one hundred and three volumes. The Edinburgh Review, founded in 1802, was one of the most influential British magazines of the 19th century. It ceased publication in 1929. The magazine took its Latin motto judex damnatur ubi nocens absolvitur (the judge is condemned when the guilty is acquitted) from Publilius Syrus. Notable contributors include Richard Harris Barham, Thomas Babington Macaulay, Walter Scott, Thomas Carlyle and many others. Under its first permanent editor, Francis Jeffrey (the first issue was edited by Sydney Smith), it was a strong supporter of the Whig party and laissez-faire politics, and regularly called for political reform. Including critical, historical, philosophical and literary essays. Containing volumes:I - third edition - October 1802-January 1803I - seventh edition - October 1802-January 1803III - first edition - October 1803-January 1804III - sixth edition - October 1803-January 1804IV - fifth edition - April-July 1804VI - fifth edition - April-July 1805VII - October 1805-January 1806IX - fourth edition - October 1806-January 1807XIII - second edition - October 1808-January 1809XIV - April-July 1809XV - October 1809-January 1810XXXII - July-October 1819XXXV - March-July 1821XXXVII - June-November 1822XXXVIII - February-May 1823XL - March-July 1824XLIV - June-September 1826XLV - December 1826-March 1827XLVI - June-October 1827XLVIII - September-December 1828LI - April-June 1830LII - October 1830-January 1831LIV - August-December 1831LVI - July 1832-January 1833LVII - January-July 1833LX - July 1834-January1835LXIV - October 1836-January 1837LXV - April-July 1837LXVI - October 1836-January 1837LXVIII - October 1838-January 1839LXIX - April-July 1839LXXIV - October 1841-January 1842LXXV - April-July 1842LXXVI - October1842-January 1843LXXXIII - January-April 1846LXXXIV - July-October 1846LXXXV - January-April 1847LXXXIX - January-April 1849XCI - October 1849-April 1850XCII - July 1850-October 1850XCIII - January-April 1851XCIV - July-October 1851XCVI - July-October 1852XCVII - January-April 1853XCVIII - July-October 1853CI - January-April 1855CIV - July-October 1856CV - January-April 1857CVI - July-October 1857CVII - January-April 1858CVIII - July-October 1858CX - July-October 1859CXI - January-April 1860CXII - July-October 1860CXIII - January-April 1861CXIV - July-October 1861CXV - July-October 1862CXVI - January-April 1862CXVII - January-April 1863CXXI - January-April 1865CXXIV - July-October 1866CXXV - January-April 1867CXXVI - July-October 1867CXXVII - January-April 1868CXXX - July-October 1869CXXXI - January-April 1870CXXXII - July-October 1870CXXXIII - January-April 1871CXXXIV - July-October 1871CXL - July-October 1874CXLI - January-April 1875CXLV - January-April 1877CXLVI - July-October 1877CXLVII - January-April 1878CL - July-October 1879CLI - January-April1880CLII - July-October 1880CLIII - January-April 1881CLIV - July-October 1881CLV - January-April 1882CLVI - July-October 1882CLVII - January-April 1883CLX - July-October 1884CLXI - January-April 1885CLXII - July-October1885CLXIV - July-October 1886CLXV - January-April 1887CLXVI - July-October 1887CLXVII - January-April 1888CLXVIII - July-October 1888CLXXIII - January-April 1891Index to I-XX (1813)Index to LI-LXXX (1850)Ten of the volumes included are original editions of the magazine, complete in original publisher's binding. These are: No. 260 (April 1868), No. 261 (July 1868), No, 265 (July 1869), No. 267 (January 1870), No. 268 (April 1870), No. 269 (July 1870), No. 270 (October 1870), No. 280 (April 1873), No. 284 (April 1874), and No. 297 (1877). Condition: In half-calf, calf, and cloth bindings. Externally, rather worn, with rubbing and wear to the extremities. Most of the joints are cracked, with six joints failed and the boards detached. Loss to backstrips on two volumes. One backstrip lifting. Tape repairs to one volume. Ink spills to the boards.

      [Bookseller: Rooke Books]
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        A Voyage of Discovery to the North Pacific Ocean: in which the Coast of Asia .. the Island of Insu ... the North, South and East Coasts of Japan, the Lieuchieux and the adjacent isles, as well as the Coast of Corea, have been examined and surveyed. Performed in his Majesty's Sloop Providence, and her Tender, in the Years 1795, 1796, 1797, 1798

      London: T. Cadell and W. Davies, 1804. Quarto. (10 1/16 x 8 1/8 inches). 9 engraved plates and maps (7 folding or double-page). Publisher's ad leaf in the rear. Expertly bound to style in half russia over contemporary marbled paper covered boards, spine with raised bands in six compartments, lettered in the second compartment, the others with a repeat decoration in gilt. "A scarce and exceedingly important work" (Hill). A foundation work for any collection of voyages, here with important surveys and accounts of Japan, Korea, China, the northwest coast of North America and including one of only a handful of 18th-century accounts of Hawaii. One of the rarest of the British voyages. "In 1793 Broughton was made commander of the Providence, Captain Bligh's old ship, and was sent out to the northwest coast of America to join Captain George Vancouver. He sailed to Rio de Janeiro, thence to Australia, Tahiti, and the Hawaiian Islands, and on to Nootka Sound on Vancouver Island. Finding that Captain Vancouver had left, Broughton sailed down the coast to Monterey, across the Pacific to the Hawaiian Islands and on to Japan. For four years he carried out a close survey of the coast of Asia and the Islands of Japan. The ship was lost off Formosa, but the crew were all saved, and work continued in the tender. He arrived back in England in 1799 and, until his death, saw much further important service, for the most part in the Far East. This voyage was one of the most important ever made to the northwest coast of America. It is on this document that Great Britain based her claim to the Oregon Territory, in 1846" (Hill). Cordier Japonica 457; Ferguson 389; Forbes 352; Hill (2004) pp.35-6; Howes B821; Judd 28; Lada-Mocarski 59; Sabin 8423; Streeter Sale 3500; TPL 36814.

      [Bookseller: Donald Heald Rare Books]
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        A PLAN OF MATHEMATICAL LEARNING TAUGHT IN THE ROYAL ACADEMY PORTSMOUTH. PERFORMED BY THOMAS WHICHCOTE, A STUDENT THERE

      Portsmouth, England: April 27, 1804. Hardcover. Large, Thick MS Beautifully Written, IllustratedBy an Early 19th Century English Naval Cadet. 375 x 279 mm (14 3/4 x 11"). 1 p.l. (title), 1-161, [1] (blank), 162-236, [1] (blank), 237-94, [1] (illustration), 295-96, [1] (blank), 297, [1] (blank), 298, [1] (blank), 299, [1] (blank), 300-424, [1] (blank), 425, [1] (blank), 426, [1] (blank), 427-54, [1] (blank), 455-509 pages, all written in a beautiful, clear cursive hand. Pleasing contemporary tree calf, flat spine skillfully rebacked preserving most of original backstrip, gilt in panels formed by multiple plain and decorative rules with sunburst centerpiece, red morocco label. COPIOUSLY ILLUSTRATED with 10 half-page and two full-page ink wash illustrations, one half-page and one full-page pen and ink drawings, and 10 half-page watercolors, all land- or seascapes; eight full-page maps and one folding map, all in color; five full-page black and white diagrams, 11 full-page color diagrams, and numerous diagrams in the text, some heightened with color. Front free endpaper with ink ownership inscription of "Thomas Whichcote, Esq., of His Majesty's Ship ye Beaulieu of 44 Guns." Corners a little bumped, spine a bit dry and crackled with a couple of one-inch chips, minor loss of gilt, folding map with two-inch tear along a fold, just touching the edge of the image, last two leaves with slight soiling and fraying to fore edges, isolated minor thumbing, small stains, and other trivial imperfections, but A VERY FINE MANUSCRIPT, the expertly restored binding sound and attractive, the leaves clean and crisp, the handsome writing entirely legible, and the illustrations demonstrating considerable artistic skill on the part of Midshipman Whichcote. This compendium of mathematical knowledge necessary for an officer in the Royal Navy was written and beautifully illustrated by a student at the Royal Naval Academy at Portsmouth, which was founded to recruit and train officers from among the many qualified young men who lacked the family connections otherwise to obtain a naval commission. The volume covers arithmetic, geometry, plane trigonometry, geography, navigation (at 100 pages, by far the longest section), spherics, spherical trigonometry, astronomy, latitude, longitude, marine surveying, fortification, gunnery, and mechanics. The text is neatly written in a very skilled and controlled hand, and examples of calculations are given. Perhaps the most unexpected and pleasurable features of this manuscript are the illustrations, which sometimes approach a kind of modest magnificence. Whichcote was a talented artist, and while at the Royal Naval Academy, he would have had the opportunity to study with noted marine artist Richard Livesay (1750-1826), who served as drawing master there from 1796 to 1811. The ink washes and watercolors here portray not only ships and scenes at sea, but also several fine landscapes, including a full-page view of the Portsmouth Academy. The fine maps show Christmas Island, the Coast of Kamchatka, Table Bay and the Cape of Good Hope, the western Atlantic with the coastline of North America and the West Indies, and the eastern Atlantic with the coast of Africa, Ireland, Greenland, and Iceland. The whole is beautifully preserved and a wonderful artifact of early 19th century naval knowledge.

      [Bookseller: Phillip J. Pirages Fine Books and Mediev]
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