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Displayed below are some selected recent viaLibri matches for books published in 1777

        A Sua Eccellenza il Sig. Principe D. (Candelabro antico di marmo, che si vede nel Museo)

      Rome 1777 - John Wilton-Ely plate 912No watermark is present.From the series "Vasi, candelabri, cippi, sarcofagi, tripodi, lucerne, ed ornamenti antichi"Giovanni Battista Piranesi was one of the leading figures in the development of the neoclassical style in the late 18th Century. As architect, archaeologist, artist, designer, collector, and antiquities dealer, he produced a series of etchings and engravings depicting the glories of ancient Rome. These fine prints served as source material for other architects and designers. He was born in Venice on the 4th October 1720. The son of a stone-mason, he was educated as an architect under his maternal uncle Matto Lucchesi and under Carlo Zucchi. In 1740 Piranesi left Venice for Rome, there he studied etching under Giuseppe Vasi. He appears to have had little success in these early years in Rome and as his father was unable to continue his allowance returned to Venice in 1744. He was soon, however, encouraged to return to Rome by Giuseppe Wagner, a successful engraver and publisher of Venice. This time he achieved success, and a constant series of works, illustrating architecture and antiquities, issued from his studio until his death in 1778. His output in etched plates is enormous (about 1000 numbers in all). While he achieved a work of magnitude in pictorial records of Roman monuments of antiquity and of the Renaissance, and gave immense archæological, antiquarian, and topographical value to this work, the artistic quality always predominates. He was fond of peopling his ruins with Callot-like figures, and "like Callot makes great use of the swelling line" (Hind). He had two sons and a daughter, all of whom helped him in his work and after his death carried on his publications in Rome and Paris. They were Francesco (born 1748 or 1756; died 1810), Pietro (who lived till after 1807) and Laura (born 1750). His position in Rome and in Europe after 1760 was a prominent one. He was well-known figure to the wealthy English visitors in Rome and was elected a Fellow of the Society of Antiquaries in 1757. Most of his life was passed in Rome, etching, writing, publishing, and directing a workshop in which the restoration and sale of antiques played a considerable part.He was famous for his poetic views of Rome and also his fantastic imaginary interiors. His skills, allied to his deep knowledge of archaeology, provided the substance for his Vedute (Views), a series of 135 etchings of ancient and contemporary Rome, published from 1745 onwards, which established the popular mental image of the city. Vasi.et Ornamenti Antichi was a collection of 110 etchings documenting large sculptural vases, together with other antiquities excavated (and in some cases created) in Italy in the 18th century. The prints were initially separately issued and sold by Piranesi over a period of several years and subsequently collected in two folio volumes, each with its own title page, in 1778. They illustrate a wide range of genuine antiquities, as well as Piranesi's own collections, from utilitarian objects such as cinerary urns, lamps, and sarcophagi to monumental vases. The plates in Vasi often included text by Piranesi with information about where the objects were discovered and their contemporary location, and the prints bore dedications to his patrons, colleagues, visitors and influential people. He believed absolutely in the supremacy of Roman over Greek architecture, an argument he expounded most forcefully in his Della magnificenza ed architettura dei Romani (On the Magnificence of Roman Architecture, 1761). his romanticized views and imaginary interiors had a profound effect on stage designers, painters of capricci such as Hubert Robert, and even writers: William Beckford, the author of the Gothic novel and Vathek . In the 20th century his imaginary interiors have been admired by the Surrealists . Reference: John Wilton-Ely. Giovanni Battista Piranesi: The Complete Etchings. San Francisco: Alan Wofsy Fine Arts, 1994.

      [Bookseller: Alexandre Antique Prints, Maps & Books]
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        Vasi Antichi di marmo eccellentemente scolpiti, si vedono in Inghilterra presso il. . .

      Rome 1777 - John Wilton-Ely plate 930An early state before the dedicationThe watermark is on the upper portion of the print but is indistinguishable.From the series "Vasi, candelabri, cippi, sarcofagi, tripodi, lucerne, ed ornamenti antichi"Giovanni Battista Piranesi was one of the leading figures in the development of the neoclassical style in the late 18th Century. As architect, archaeologist, artist, designer, collector, and antiquities dealer, he produced a series of etchings and engravings depicting the glories of ancient Rome. These fine prints served as source material for other architects and designers. He was born in Venice on the 4th October 1720. The son of a stone-mason, he was educated as an architect under his maternal uncle Matto Lucchesi and under Carlo Zucchi. In 1740 Piranesi left Venice for Rome, there he studied etching under Giuseppe Vasi. He appears to have had little success in these early years in Rome and as his father was unable to continue his allowance returned to Venice in 1744. He was soon, however, encouraged to return to Rome by Giuseppe Wagner, a successful engraver and publisher of Venice. This time he achieved success, and a constant series of works, illustrating architecture and antiquities, issued from his studio until his death in 1778. His output in etched plates is enormous (about 1000 numbers in all). While he achieved a work of magnitude in pictorial records of Roman monuments of antiquity and of the Renaissance, and gave immense archæological, antiquarian, and topographical value to this work, the artistic quality always predominates. He was fond of peopling his ruins with Callot-like figures, and "like Callot makes great use of the swelling line" (Hind). He had two sons and a daughter, all of whom helped him in his work and after his death carried on his publications in Rome and Paris. They were Francesco (born 1748 or 1756; died 1810), Pietro (who lived till after 1807) and Laura (born 1750). His position in Rome and in Europe after 1760 was a prominent one. He was well-known figure to the wealthy English visitors in Rome and was elected a Fellow of the Society of Antiquaries in 1757. Most of his life was passed in Rome, etching, writing, publishing, and directing a workshop in which the restoration and sale of antiques played a considerable part.He was famous for his poetic views of Rome and also his fantastic imaginary interiors. His skills, allied to his deep knowledge of archaeology, provided the substance for his Vedute (Views), a series of 135 etchings of ancient and contemporary Rome, published from 1745 onwards, which established the popular mental image of the city. Vasi.et Ornamenti Antichi was a collection of 110 etchings documenting large sculptural vases, together with other antiquities excavated (and in some cases created) in Italy in the 18th century. The prints were initially separately issued and sold by Piranesi over a period of several years and subsequently collected in two folio volumes, each with its own title page, in 1778. They illustrate a wide range of genuine antiquities, as well as Piranesi's own collections, from utilitarian objects such as cinerary urns, lamps, and sarcophagi to monumental vases. The plates in Vasi often included text by Piranesi with information about where the objects were discovered and their contemporary location, and the prints bore dedications to his patrons, colleagues, visitors and influential people. He believed absolutely in the supremacy of Roman over Greek architecture, an argument he expounded most forcefully in his Della magnificenza ed architettura dei Romani (On the Magnificence of Roman Architecture, 1761). his romanticized views and imaginary interiors had a profound effect on stage designers, painters of capricci such as Hubert Robert, and even writers: William Beckford, the author of the Gothic novel and Vathek . In the 20th century his imaginary interiors have been admired by the Surrealists . Reference: John Wilton-Ely. Giovan

      [Bookseller: Alexandre Antique Prints, Maps & Books]
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        Monumento antico che si presso il Sig. Giorgio Aufrere. . .

      Rome 1777 - John Wilton-Ely plate 934The watermark that is present is number 36 in John Wilton-Ely on page 1162 and is dated between 1760 and 1780.From the series "Vasi, candelabri, cippi, sarcofagi, tripodi, lucerne, ed ornamenti antichi"Giovanni Battista Piranesi was one of the leading figures in the development of the neoclassical style in the late 18th Century. As architect, archaeologist, artist, designer, collector, and antiquities dealer, he produced a series of etchings and engravings depicting the glories of ancient Rome. These fine prints served as source material for other architects and designers. He was born in Venice on the 4th October 1720. The son of a stone-mason, he was educated as an architect under his maternal uncle Matto Lucchesi and under Carlo Zucchi. In 1740 Piranesi left Venice for Rome, there he studied etching under Giuseppe Vasi. He appears to have had little success in these early years in Rome and as his father was unable to continue his allowance returned to Venice in 1744. He was soon, however, encouraged to return to Rome by Giuseppe Wagner, a successful engraver and publisher of Venice. This time he achieved success, and a constant series of works, illustrating architecture and antiquities, issued from his studio until his death in 1778. His output in etched plates is enormous (about 1000 numbers in all). While he achieved a work of magnitude in pictorial records of Roman monuments of antiquity and of the Renaissance, and gave immense archæological, antiquarian, and topographical value to this work, the artistic quality always predominates. He was fond of peopling his ruins with Callot-like figures, and "like Callot makes great use of the swelling line" (Hind). He had two sons and a daughter, all of whom helped him in his work and after his death carried on his publications in Rome and Paris. They were Francesco (born 1748 or 1756; died 1810), Pietro (who lived till after 1807) and Laura (born 1750). His position in Rome and in Europe after 1760 was a prominent one. He was well-known figure to the wealthy English visitors in Rome and was elected a Fellow of the Society of Antiquaries in 1757. Most of his life was passed in Rome, etching, writing, publishing, and directing a workshop in which the restoration and sale of antiques played a considerable part.He was famous for his poetic views of Rome and also his fantastic imaginary interiors. His skills, allied to his deep knowledge of archaeology, provided the substance for his Vedute (Views), a series of 135 etchings of ancient and contemporary Rome, published from 1745 onwards, which established the popular mental image of the city. Vasi.et Ornamenti Antichi was a collection of 110 etchings documenting large sculptural vases, together with other antiquities excavated (and in some cases created) in Italy in the 18th century. The prints were initially separately issued and sold by Piranesi over a period of several years and subsequently collected in two folio volumes, each with its own title page, in 1778. They illustrate a wide range of genuine antiquities, as well as Piranesi's own collections, from utilitarian objects such as cinerary urns, lamps, and sarcophagi to monumental vases. The plates in Vasi often included text by Piranesi with information about where the objects were discovered and their contemporary location, and the prints bore dedications to his patrons, colleagues, visitors and influential people. He believed absolutely in the supremacy of Roman over Greek architecture, an argument he expounded most forcefully in his Della magnificenza ed architettura dei Romani (On the Magnificence of Roman Architecture, 1761). his romanticized views and imaginary interiors had a profound effect on stage designers, painters of capricci such as Hubert Robert, and even writers: William Beckford, the author of the Gothic novel and Vathek . In the 20th century his imaginary interiors have been admired by the Surrealists . Reference: John Wilton-Ely. Giovanni

      [Bookseller: Alexandre Antique Prints, Maps & Books]
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        COMMISSIONE DOGALE per Antonio Piovene, mandato Capitanio a Verona.

      Die V Martij, Venezia, 1777 - Manoscritto in 8° (222x157); 76 carte in pergamena non numerate, manoscritte ad inchiostro bruno con i nomi del Piovene e del Doge Aloisio Mocenigo, che commissiona la carica al nobiluomo, rialzati in oro.Splendida antiporta allegorica policroma miniata su pergamena, raffigurante il Doge con il leone di San Marco in basso, mentre in cielo San Giuseppe presenta il bastone fiorito a Maria con Gesù Bambino in braccio.Importante e raro documento di storia veronese in cui sono riportati doveri del Capitanio e le regole comportamentali nel governo della città. Le Commissioni dogali per la città di Verona sono molto difficilmente riscontrabili sul mercato.Buona legatura in piena pelle marmorizzata, filetti in oro, dorso a cinque scomparti. Perfetto stato di conservazione eccetto piccoli difetto al piatto posteriore.

      [Bookseller: libreria antiquaria perini Sas di Perini]
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        Vita del beato Gioanni di Parma settimo general ministro di tutto l'Ordine de' Minori

      Parma: Dalla Stamperia Reale. 1777. First Edition. Hardcover. xix, (1), 224pp. Contemporary vellum backed paper covered boards with gold lettering on the spine. Some stains to covers, stain affecting lower corner of boards and of leaves, previous owner's name to front pastedown endpaper and to title page. A very good copy. In the Italian language. ; Octavo .

      [Bookseller: Parigi Books, ABAA/ILAB]
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        L'Odyssée d'Homère traduite en vers, avec des remarques, suivie d'une dissertation sur les voyages d'Ulysse.

      Brunet, Paris 1777 - 509 pp et 458 pp. Première édition. 2 volumes. Petits manques ( 2mm) aux coiffes. Reliure plein veau d'époque, dos à 5 nerfs avec entrenerfs ornés de fleurons dorés aux petits fers, pièces de titre et de tomaison en maroquin brun, tranches jaspées.

      [Bookseller: de KunstBurg]
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        A Sketch of the Operations of His Majesty's Fleet and Army Under the Command of Vice Admiral the Rt. Hble. Lord Viscount Howe and Gen./Sr.Wm. Howe, K.B. in 1776

      [London]: Des Barres, 1777. A magnificent 1777 map of the sites of the Revolutionary War battles in and around New York City Des Barres' "Sketch" depicts the entire field of action for the latter half of 1776 in the battle for control of New York City and the Hudson River. The map, extending from Sandy Hook to Haverstraw, and Jamaica Bay to the western New Jersey establishes in detail the geographical setting for the war as it took place in this region, showing troop positions and strengths, fortifications and battle sites, as well as carefully delineated topographical details, roads, towns, even houses; shoals, banks, soundings in the bay and on the rivers; warships up and down the East River and Hudson. The sites of various embarkations and one of the first American Naval battles: the fire-ship attack on the Phoenix and the Rose are shown. The map also includes an inset of References, which is an index of all the major events from the initial invasion up to and including the battle at Fort Washington. After being forced to evacuate Boston, General Howe brought his army down to Staten Island for an assault on Brooklyn and New York. Howe and his brother, Admiral Richard Howe, built an armada, the largest British invading force in history to that point in time. The Continental Congress had determined that Washington should defend New York, despite the fact that he was outnumbered and his troops inexperienced. It is very much to Washington's credit that though he lost this sequence of battles, he did not lose the war. With the exception of the mistaken defense of Fort Washington, where 2,800 men surrendered, Washington kept his army intact to fight again. This was Howe's biggest chance as most of the Continental Army was at New York. The British invasion began on August 27, 1776 on the southwest end of Long Island. It was, from the British point of view, highly successful, by the end of August 29th, the Americans appeared to be trapped in Brooklyn Heights. However, the Americans quietly and famously escaped, fleeing up Manhattan, while the British slowly pursued them. Washington then left Manhattan for Westchester where he evaded the British until they met in White Plains. There Howe fought a tepid battle and was not able or unwilling to inflict the kind of blow that might have ended the war. After Washington withdrew, Howe returned to Manhattan to take Fort Washington. Cornwallis occupied Fort Lee on the opposite shore. Washington withdrew to New Jersey and then crossed the Delaware to Pennsylvania. These are the events that took place on the geographical setting handsomely portrayed in this fine map. "One of the greatest of the 'Atlantic Neptune' charts, with the best topographical information on the lower Hudson River valley, western Long Island and Staten Island," according to Nebenzahl. Considering the large, elephant folio scope of the map, it is incredibly precise and well-informed. As with Des Barres' greatly esteemed sea charts, this map brings to the study of military events his apparently inexhaustible capacity for detail. The Atlantic Neptune was the first British sea atlas of the North American colonies, and due to Des Barres' synergy of great empirical accuracy with unrivalled artistic virtue, it is considered to be one of the most important achievements of eighteenth-century cartography. Upon the conclusion of the Seven Year's War, Britain's empire in North America was greatly expanded, and this required the creation of a master atlas featuring new and accurate sea charts for use by the Royal Navy. Des Barres was charged with this Herculean task, publishing the first volume in London in 1775, which was soon followed by further volumes. Des Barres' monumental endeavor eventually featured over two-hundred charts and aquatint views, many being found in several states. This is the only known state of the map. This copy with the land elements with original wash colour, the water elements with later colour. Provenance : The Captain "Larry" Sneden house is located in legendary Snedens Landing on the western bank of the Hudson River. The house, an authentic Dutch colonial, was built at an historically important point both before and after the American Revolution. A ferry ran from Dobb's Ferry on the Westchester side to Snedens Landing from the early 1700's through the early1960's. Washington and his troops crossed here during the early days of the Revolution. Nebenzahl 99; Seller and van Ee 1057; National Maritime Museum 122. Copper-engraved and etched map with aquatint, hand-coloured, on watermarked: "Bates" laid paper. (Expertly repaired tears).

      [Bookseller: Donald Heald Rare Books]
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        A Voyage Round The World, In His Britannic Majesty’s Sloop, Resolution, commanded by Capt. James Cook, during the Years 1772, 3, 4, and 5.

      London: Printed for B.White, J.Robson, P.Elmsly, and G.Robinson, 1777. - 2 Volumes. 4to. pp. xviii, [2], 602; 2 p.l., 607. without the errata leaf at the end of Vol. I. folding engraved map (frontis.). An attractive set in contemporary sprinkled calf, neatly rebacked, corners renewed, spines tooled in gilt (Vol. I title-leaf professionally remargined at lower edge & upper outer corner with small repair, marginal repair to GG2-3 affecting part of headline, occasional spotting). First Edition of this important account of Cook’s second voyage, which preceded the publication of the official record by some six weeks. The author and his father, Johann Reinhold, served as naturalists on the expedition. While the elder Forster was originally to have written the account, he was forbidden to do so because of a dispute with the Admiralty concerning his emoluments. It is based on his journal and also draws from Cook’s own although no acknowledgement is given. Humboldt said that he was indebted to this work more so than to any other for his early love of nature and tropical beauty. On his second, and historically most important voyage, Cook determined that the ‘Terra Australis Incognita’, which supposedly lay between New Zealand and South America did not exist, and accomplished the first crossing of the Antarctic Circle. He also suggested the existence of an antarctic land mass, but this was not to be proved until the explorations of the nineteenth century. Cook revisited New Zealand, and discovered, or re-explored and charted many of the islands in the Pacific, including Easter Island, the Marquesas, Tahita and the Society Islands, the Tonga Islands, the New Hebrides, and New Caledonia. A vast amount of scientific and ethnographical information was gathered, and as a result of new techniques developed by Cook, not one crew member on the voyage died from scurvy, a remarkable achievement for the time and for which Cook was awarded the Copley gold medal. Beddie 1247. Cox I p. 60. Hill p. 108. Hocken pp. 16-17. Holmes 23. Kroepelien 450. O’Reilly-Reitman 382. Sabin 25140. Spence 464. [Attributes: First Edition; Hard Cover]

      [Bookseller: D & E LAKE LTD. (ABAC/ILAB)]
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        La Crimee, la Nouvelle Russie, les Tartares Nugay ry d\' Oczakow, les Zaporoviens, et partie de la Circassie.

      Venice 1777 - A detailed attractive 18th century map of Ukraine published in Venice. , Size : 420x560 (mm), 16.5x22 (Inches), Hand Colored

      [Bookseller: Alexandre Antique Prints, Maps & Books]
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        Storia Polemica delle Proibizioni de' Libri

      Rome: Per Generoso Salomoni. 1777. 4to - over 9¾" - 12" Tall. F First Edition. S Paperback. Very Good-. 4to xx,398pp Text in Italian (with numerous quotations in Latin). History o f book censorship from Roman times through the Index Expurgatorius of Pope Alexander VII; dedicated to Pope Pius VI. Scarce. Bound in contemporary hea vy stock plain paper, with brown rawhide ties at spine; plain endpapers. VG - (slight soiling and rubbing to covers; original ties worn, first few leav es detaching from spine, slight internal browning and creasing to few leave s).

      [Bookseller: Arundel Books of Seattle]
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        Histoire générale des voyages, ou nouvelle collection de toutes les relations de voyages par mer et par terre. Tome vingt-troisième: Voyages et établissemens aux Antilles. (Quarto ed.).

      Amsterdam, Van Harrevelt & Changuion, 1777. - Nouvelle édition. 4to. (IV)+477 (+1) pp. Complete with 8 maps (incl. 7 fold.) & 9 plts. (all engr.). Hardcover. Late 19th-century half calf with 2 gilt-lettered title labels on spine, marbled boards & endpapers. VG. (Occas. light waterst. in top margin). * Incl. the French in Hispaniola or Santo Domingo, Saint Christopher, Martinique, Guadeloupe, Grenada & Grenadins, Sainte Lucie; the English in Jamaica, Barbados, Antigua, Montserrat, Nevis, Barbuda, Anguilla, Bermuda (Summer Islands), St. Lucia; with supplement on St.Thomas, Virgin Islands, the Dutch in St. Martin, Saba & St. Eustatius, St.Croix, St. Vincent, etc. Maps of Hispaniola (Saint Domingue), St. Christopher, Martinique, Guadeloupe, Grenada, St. Lucia, Jamaica, Barbados. - Sabin 65404: Mainly a reprint of the Paris edition, but with many corrections and additions, especially in the later volumes. The maps and plates were finely engraved by J. van der Schley. [Attributes: Hard Cover]

      [Bookseller: Charbo's Antiquariaat]
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        THE LADIES' DIARY: OR WOMAN'S ALMANACK, FOR THE YEAR OF OUR LORD 1777 [-88]; . containing many improvements in arts and sciences, and many entertaining particulars: designed for the use and diversion of the fair-sex. 12 volumes in 2.

      London: Printed for the Company of Stationers and sold by George Hawkins and later John Wilkie -88 1777 - 8vo, (173x112mm), 48;48;48;48;48;48; 48;48;48;48;48;48p. printed in red and black with a woodcut on the titles and cuts and diagrams in the texts, tax stamp on the titles. The run preserved in two volumes in a contemporary binding of purple paper over limp boards with ms. back-labels. Typographic bookplate of Matthew Flinders, Donnington, Lincolnshire in each volume. A very good collection. The seventy-fourth to eighty-fifth annual appearances of this influential almanac founded in 1704 by John Tipper a Coventry schoolmaster. By this period it was edited by the mathematician Charles Hutton, Professor at Woolwich Academy and both Fellow and Secretary of the Royal Society. The Ladies' Diary was aimed primarily at the new market of educated, leisured, middle-class women and its most successful feature was an annual set of riddles or 'enigmas' in verse. Readers sent in their solutions, also in verse, and were doubtless gratified to see their names and addresses in print and to win one of the prizes as, equally doubtless, were those who are also named and who contributed worthy efforts. The Ladies' Diary was not, however, merely light entertainment and, as in these issues, also included mathematical problems described as another form of enigma. This remarkable assemblage in its contemporary binding is given an added attraction by the presence in each volume of the bookplate of Matthew Flinders, the father of one of the world's foremost navigators. [Attributes: Hard Cover]

      [Bookseller: Barry McKay Rare Books]
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        A Map of the most Inhabited part of New England containing the Provinces of Massachusets Bay and New Hampshire, with the Colonies of Conecticut and Rhode Island, Divided into Counties and Townships: The whole composed from Actual Surveys and its Situation adjusted by Astronomical Observations

      Chez Le Rouge rue des grands Augustins, Paris 1777 - A very fine copy of this highly important and large scale map of New England, the finest map of the region available to military commanders during the Revolutionary War This is the grandest, most accurate and detailed map of New England produced during the British colonial period. It depicts the entire region from Long Island Sound up north to the line of 44'30 of latitude. While it shows that the coastal areas and the lower Connecticutt Valley were well settled, areas of the interior, especially in New Hampshire and the future Vermont were just developing, with the early boundaries of townships having recently been established by surveyors. Importantly, this map contains two detailed cartographic insets, one of the city of Boston (upper-left), and another of Boston Harbor on the lower-right sheet. The map is also adorned with a very handsome pictorial title cartouche, depicting the arrival of the Pilgrims at Plymouth Rock in 1620. The present map is the edition produced by Georges-Louis Le Rouge, then the royal Geographer to Louis XVI, and was significantly updated from the original issue of 1755. Copies of this issue would most certainly have been consulted by French commanders such as the Comtes D'Estaing and Rochambeau who both led forces in New England following France's entry into the Revolutionary War in support of the American cause in 1778. This map's maker, John Green, was an intriguing and larger-than-life figure, who has been called "the genius behind Jefferys". In addition to his extensive cartographic abilities, Green's personal history also stands out from amongst the biographies of other 18th-century British map makers. Green was born Braddock Mead in Ireland around 1688, married in Dublin in 1715 and moved to London in 1717. He was imprisoned in 1728 for trying to defraud an Irish heiress, and assumed his alias after his release from prison. He worked with Ephriam Chambers on his Universal Dictionary before joining the employ of Cave, Astley, and Jefferys. William Cumming remarked that Mead/Green 'had a number of marked characteristics as a cartographer . One was his ability to collect, to analyze the value of, and to use a wide variety of sources; these he acknowledged scrupulously on the maps he designed and even more fully in accompanying remarks. Another outstanding characteristic was his intelligent compilation and careful evaluation of reports on latitudes and longitudes used in the construction of his maps, which he also entered in tables on the face of the maps . Mead's contributions to cartography stand out . At a time when the quality and the ethics of map production were at a low ebb in England, he vigorously urged and practiced the highest standards; in the making of maps and navigational charts he was in advance of his time. For this he deserves due credit.' (Cumming, p.45). McCorkle, New England in Early Printed Maps , 755.19; Sellers & Van Ee, Maps & Charts of North America & West Indies , 802; cf. Crone, "John Green. Notes on a neglected Eighteenth Century Geographer and Cartographer," Imago Mundi, VI (1950) p. 89-91; Crone, "Further Notes on Braddock Mead, alias John Green" Imago Mundi , VIII (1951) p. 69; Cumming, British Maps of Colonial America, pp.45-47. Copper-engraved map, on four joined sheets, with original outline colour, in excellent condition.

      [Bookseller: Donald A. Heald Rare Books (ABAA)]
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        Direzioni della Prospettiva Teorica corrispondenti a quelle dell'Architettura. Istruzione a' Giovani Studenti di Pittura, e Architettura nell'Accademia Clementina dell'Instituto delle Scienze, raccolte. Divise in cinque parti.

      nella Stamperia di Lelio dalla Volpe, 1777 - 1783, in Bologna, - 2 voll. in-8° (185x108mm), pp. (12), 144; 144; legatura coeva p. pergamena con unghie e con titolo, segnatura di volume e fregi in oro su tasselli ai dorsi. Tagli spruzzati. Dediche a stampa dell'autore a Santa Caterina De Vigri da Bologna e a San Petronio. Capilettera e fregi tipografici incisi su legno. 75 tavole incise su rame f.t. al primo vol. e 57 al secondo (le tavv. 70-75 sono anteposte fra le tavv. 59-60; nel secondo volume sono presenti due tavole col numero 44, sicché risulta una tavola in più rispetto alla normale collazione; anche il Canterzani, p. 293, n. 12, non accenna che a 56 tavole). Bell'esemplare. Quarta edizione del primo volume, terza edizione del secondo (le due parti, apparse rispettivamente nel 1725 e nel 1731, vennero successivamente riedite più volte dal Dalla Volpe, spesso abbinate con date diverse sulla base delle disponibilità dell'editore). Versione "ridotta" e adattata a fini didattici (essa era destinata agli allievi dell'Accademia Clementina) dell'Architettura Civile del 1711. "Questi precetti elementari preceduti da un compendio di geometria pratica servirono per lungo tempo in Bologna alle Scuole del disegno; e sono in sostanza la prima e seconda parte dell'Architettura Civile. Ristampa simile alle precedenti edizioni enunciate agli anni 1725, 1731, 1753, 1764 di questo catalogo. I due volumi portano in fronte la stessa dedica, lo stesso preambolo, e corredati dalle stesse incisioni" (Canterzani, p. 26). Ferdinando Galli Bibiena fu esponente di un'importante famiglia di architetti e scenografi, pittori e quadraturisti. Stimato per la straordinaria capacità nella gestione dello strumento prospettico, dopo aver lavorato alla Corte dei Farnese in qualità di primo pittore e architetto, ottenne importanti incarichi a Barcellona, da Carlo III d'Asburgo, e successivamente a Vienna alla corte dell'imperatore Carlo VI che lo insignì del titolo di ''primo architetto teatrale''. Cfr. Canterzani, cit.: e p. 293, n. 12. "Questi precetti elementari preceduti da un compendio di geometria pratica servirono per lungo tempo in Bologna alle Scuole del disegno; e sono in sostanza la prima e seconda parte dell'Architettura Civile.". Fowler, 135. Berlin Katalog, 2630. Cicognara, n. 517:" [incisioni] nitidamente intagliate in finissimi e precisi contorni". Riccardi, I, 153. Comolli, II, pp. 341-344. Poudra, Histoire de la perspective, Paris, 1864, pp. 515-516.

      [Bookseller: Gilibert Libreria Antiquaria (ILAB-LILA)]
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        The Province of New Jersey, Divided into East and West, commonly called the Jerseys

      London: Wm. Faden, 1777. The first state of one of the finest and most celebrated maps of New Jersey, made during the Revolutionary War This elegant composition depicts New Jersey in finely engraved detail at a large scale of 7 miles to an inch. The map was the grandest representation of the state made up to that time, taking in the entire breadth of the state, as well as the Hudson Valley, most of Long Island, eastern Pennsylvania and all of Delaware Bay. It captures the state's rich topography, including the Jersey Highlands and the Palisades in the north and the broad Pine Barrens and coastal marshes in the south. The county divisions, major roads and towns are all carefully depicted, indicating that New Jersey was, by the standards of the time, heavily populated, having over 120,000 inhabitants. Faden based his rendering of the state largely on the manuscript works of Bernard Ratzer, a British military surveyor most famous for his map of New York City. Ratzer's rendezvous with New Jersey cartography stemmed from the resolution of the bitter boundary dispute between that state and New York that had raged for over a century. In 1764, George III charged Samuel Holland and William De Brahm with settling the boundary, and their demarcation was finally surveyed by Ratzer in 1769. Ratzer's line is noted on the map as "The boundary settled by commissioners in 1769". Two of Ratzer's New Jersey manuscripts, one dealing with the boundary question, and another featuring Monmouth and Ocean Counties are today preserved in the Faden Collection at the Library of Congress. Faden supplemented Ratzer's work with surveys of the northern part of the state made by Gerard Bancker. Curiously, it seems that Bancker's work found its way to Faden, by way of John Murray, the Earl of Dunmore, the former governor of Virginia, who was given a draft by Bancker when he stopped in at New York on his way back to London. An interesting feature present on the map are the two lines bisecting the state, being the boundary lines between the archaic colonies of East and West Jersey. In 1664, Charles II granted the New Jersey charter jointly to Lord Berkeley and Sir George Carteret. Berkeley sold his share to John Fenwick, a Quaker who, in turn, passed it on to a consortium that included William Penn. The king elected to renew only Carteret's charter to the colony, and from 1676 the already small province was split into two awkward colonies. One of the lines present on this map is "Keith's Line" referring to the 1687 demarcation of the boundary by surveyor George Keith. While the two colonies were reunited under a royal governor in 1702, certain private land ownership questions predicated on the partition necessitated that an internal line of division persist, which was re-demarcated as the "Lawrence Line" in 1743. The map is embellished with a very fine cartouche, formed by trees framing a bucolic scene inhabited by farm houses and raccoons. The lower left of the map is adorned with a table of astrological observations. This copy is an excellent example of this important map, featuring a strong impression and good margins. In a careful original hand, New Jersey, and its internal boundaries have been outlined in pink, while surrounding jurisdictions are outlined in a yellow-green hue. Guthorn, British Maps of the American Revolution , p.39; Degrees of Latitude , 47; Schwartz & Ehrenberg, Mapping of America, p.193; Snyder, The Mapping of New Jersey , pp.57-59. Copper-engraved map, with original outline colour, on two joined sheets, in very good condition.

      [Bookseller: Donald Heald Rare Books]
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        THE PROVINCE OF NEW JERSEY, DIVIDED INTO EAST AND WEST, COMMONLY CALLED THE JERSEYS.

      London: Wm. Faden, Dec. 1, 1777. - Copper-engraved map. Sheet size: 32 x 24 inches. In good condition. The first state of one of the finest and most celebrated maps of New Jersey, made during the Revolutionary War. This elegant composition depicts New Jersey in finely engraved detail at a large scale of seven miles to an inch. The map was the grandest representation of the state made up to that time, taking in the entire breadth of the state, as well as the Hudson Valley, most of Long Island, eastern Pennsylvania, and all of Delaware Bay. It captures the state's rich topography, including the Jersey Highlands and the Palisades in the north and the broad Pine Barrens and coastal marshes in the south. The county divisions, major roads and towns are all carefully depicted, indicating that New Jersey was, by the standards of the time, heavily populated, having over 120,000 inhabitants. Faden based his rendering of the state largely on the manuscript works of Bernard Ratzer, a British military surveyor most famous for his map of New York City. Ratzer's rendezvous with New Jersey cartography stemmed from the resolution of the bitter boundary dispute between that state and New York that had raged for over a century. In 1764, George III charged Samuel Holland and William De Brahm with settling the boundary, and their demarcation was finally surveyed by Ratzer in 1769. Ratzer's line is noted on the map as "The boundary settled by commissioners in 1769." Two of Ratzer's New Jersey manuscripts, one dealing with the boundary question, and another featuring Monmouth and Ocean Counties, are today preserved in the Faden Collection at the Library of Congress. Faden supplemented Ratzer's work with surveys of the northern part of the state made by Gerard Bancker. Curiously, it seems that Bancker's work found its way to Faden, by way of John Murray, the Earl of Dunmore, the former governor of Virginia, who was given a draft by Bancker when he stopped in at New York on his way back to London. An interesting feature present on the map are the two lines bisecting the state, being the boundary lines between the archaic colonies of East and West Jersey. In 1664, Charles II granted the New Jersey charter jointly to Lord Berkeley and Sir George Carteret. Berkeley sold his share to John Fenwick, a Quaker who, in turn, passed it on to a consortium that included William Penn. The King elected to renew only Carteret's charter to the colony, and from 1676 the already small province was split into two awkward colonies. One of the lines present on this map is "Keith's Line" referring to the 1687 demarcation of the boundary by surveyor George Keith. While the two colonies were reunited under a royal governor in 1702, certain private land ownership questions predicated on the partition necessitated that an internal line of division persist, which was redemarcated as the "Lawrence Line" in 1743. The map is embellished with a very fine cartouche, formed by trees framing a bucolic scene inhabited by farm houses and raccoons. The lower left of the map is adorned with a table of astrological observations. This copy is an excellent example of this important map, featuring a strong impression and good margins. GUTHORN, BRITISH MAPS OF THE AMERICAN REVOLUTION, p.39. DEGREES OF LATITUDE 47 (state 1). SCHWARTZ & EHRENBERG, p.193. SNYDER, THE MAPPING OF NEW JERSEY, pp.57-59. BMC MAPS 10:251. STEVENS & TREE 37a.

      [Bookseller: William Reese Company - Americana]
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        The Province of New Jersey, Divided into East and West, commonly called the Jerseys. Engraved & Published by Wm. Faden, Charing Cross, December 1st 1777.

      London 1777 - Original outline color; small area of wear at one fold expertly repaired with some reinstatement of image, else excellent. The definitive map of New Jersey of the 18th century, in its rare first state. It was the first map to present the geography of New Jersey with any degree of detailed accuracy. It also illuminates for the first time the state¿s topography, river networks, early road system, and the locations of its natural resources. Moreover, Schwartz states that it is "the most important general map of New Jersey during the revolutionary period." As such, it would have been consulted by commanders on both sides during the American Revolution. According to a note on the map, it was based on surveys that were made in 1769 for the purpose of settling the border between New York and New Jersey, which had long been in dispute. The surveys were supervised by Lt. Bernard Ratzer, an important British military engineer and surveyor before and during the Revolution. The resulting boundary line, which was permanently adopted, is shown on the map. (The map also shows two different boundaries between East and West Jersey.) Ratzer was also the author of what is considered the finest colonial map of New York City. William Faden was an English publisher who played a leading role in filling the demand for accurate maps, charts and plans relating to the campaigns of the American Revolution. "His fine engravings made him one of the greatest cartographers of the late 18th century" (Snyder). The map¿s large, decorative cartouche illustrates a typical New Jersey farmhouse and several beavers, the favorite animal of colonial cartographers. Snyder, John P., The Mapping of New Jersey, pp. 57-61; Ristow, Walter W., American Maps and Mapmakers; Schwartz, The Mapping of America, plate 120.

      [Bookseller: Martayan Lan, Inc]
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        Memoirs of the Kings of France, of the Race of Valois

      London - Edwards and Charles Dilly, 1777 Book. Very Good. Hardcover. First edition. Memoirs of the Kings of France interspersed with interesting anecdotes. To which is added a tour through the Western, Southern and interior provinces of France, in a series of letters,'First edition. In two volumes complete. Sir Nathaniel William Wraxall, 1st Baronet (8 April 1751 7 November 1831) was an English author. In 177 he published his Memoirs of the Kings of France of the Race of Valois, to which he appended an account of his tour in the Western, Southern and Interior Provinces of France. With an ink inscription of previous owner's name to title page of both volumes. Condition: In a full speckled calf binding. Externally, generally smart but with some wear to extremities and a few external repairs to original binding. With the odd mark to boards and slight wear to rear board of second volume. Cracking to joints. Internally, generally firmly bound with the odd page loosening. Bright but with slight scattered spotting and handling marks to pages. Ink inscription of previous owner's name to gutter of page 15 of volume one. Marginal off-setting from binding to endpapers. Overall: VERY GOOD.

      [Bookseller: Rooke Books]
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        Life and Opinions of Tristram Shandy, Gentleman

      London: R. & J. Dodsley and T. Becket, 1777. 6 vols. 16 mo. Mottled calf, some covers detached; new edition. Frontispiece after Hogarth. Publisher's ad: "a New Edition, complete in 6 vols. Price 18s. bound." Bookplate of William Henry Shirreff.

      [Bookseller: Alan Wofsy Fine Arts]
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        Guadaloupe, Mariegalante, Antigua

      John Thompson (1777-1840) was a Scottish cartographer from Edinburgh. Like many cartographers in the 18th century, Thompson moved away from the decorative cartouches and colorful maps of his predecessors and chose to detail his maps with precision and definition.Thompson published ?New General Atlas? in 1817 in partnership with James Kirkwood, the leading engraver in Edinburgh. Kirkwood?s printmaking family produced most of the banknotes of Scotland, maps, globes and atlases and was well acknowledged for their great skill.This map, ?West India Islands: Guadaloupe, Marie Galante, Antigua? measures 21 1/4? x 28 1/4? and is in excellent condition with light staining in the margins and faint evidence of previous repair to the central crease.These three islands, all part of the Leeward Islands in the Lesser Antilles are finely detailed with their capitals and major cities noted, as well as pots all along the circumferences of the islands. Although the map stays true to the simplistic styling of the 18th century, the mountain rages of these islands are hash-marked in relief to show the changing topography and further the precise detailing.

      [Bookseller: Arader Galleries]
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        Vita del beato Gioanni di Parma settimo general ministro di tutto l'Ordine de' Minori.

      Dalla Stamperia Reale, Parma 1777 - xix, (1), 224pp. Contemporary vellum backed paper covered boards with gold lettering on the spine. Some stains to covers, stain affecting lower corner of boards and of leaves, previous owner's name to front pastedown endpaper and to title page. A very good copy. In the Italian language. ; Octavo [Attributes: First Edition; Hard Cover]

      [Bookseller: Parigi Books, ABAA/ILAB]
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        Chemische Abhandlung von der Luft und dem Feuer. Nebst einem Vorbericht von Torbern Bergman.

      Upsala & Leipzig Magn. Swederus. zu finden bey S.L. Crusius 1777. - 8vo, 3 ff., 16, 155, (1) pp. Engraved vignette on title & one folding engraved plate, both depicting chemical apparatus. Bound with:BERGMANN, Torbern. Anleitung zu Vorlesungen über die Beschaffenheit und den Nutzen der Chemie, und die allgemeinsten Verschiedenheiten natürlicher Körper. Aus d. Schwedischen übersetzt. Stockholm and Leipzig, Swederus. 1779. 8vo, 95, (3 blank) pp. Niedersächsische Staats- und Universitätsbibliothek and Berlin records call for xxxi preliminary pages as well as 95 numbered pages. Utrecht, Union Catalog Hesse, Bayrische Staatsbibliothek Munich records match our collation. First edition of this extremely scarce and important book which contains the announcement of Scheele’s discovery of oxygen, made independently of, and two years prior to, Priestley. Scheele’s monumental discovery was made by 1773; he had begun his experiments on oxygen in 1770. The publication of this book was delayed due to the fact that Tobern Bergman was two years late in delivering his promised preface. The work is fittingly bound with Bergman’s own lectures on the nature and application of chemistry, a rare work that is not included in his collected works Opuscula Physica et Chemica."The independent discovery of oxygen is here described and the composition of air by two gases is illustrated. One of these is necessary for combustion and respiration and it is absorbed by a number of solid substances and can be artificially produced; the second gas (nitrogen) prevents combustion. Scheele’s ‘fire-air’ (oxygen) could be produced from saltpetre, from black oxide of manganese, from oxide of mercury, etc. The photo-sensitive nature of chloride of silver was announced, a discovery that led to photography" (Dibner, Heralds of Science, 41). "Scheele (1742-1786) was an experimental genius; he made more discoveries of first-rate importance with fewer opportunities and scantier appliances than any one else, and his skill, insight and power of illuminating experimental results have never been surpassed, if indeed, they have ever been equaled" (Ferguson II.331).Bergman (1735-1784) was a member of the Swedish Academy and from 1767 professor of chemistry at Uppsala. He had a high regard for the younger Scheele and "did everything in his power to bring him to the notice of the scientific world. Bergman owed to him his transition from obscurity to a leading position in the world of science." (Partington, III, p. 208) His Essay on the General Usefulness of Chemistry and its Application to the Various Occasions of Life (thus the title of the English edition of 1783) gives "a general view [of] medical, oeconomical, and technical chemistry, halurgy, geurgy, theiurgy, salts, earths, inflammable substances, metals, waters and airs." (Partington III, p. 184) Bergman remained a follower of the phlogiston theory all his life.OCLC: Scheele: Burndy, Chemical Heritage Foundation, Cornell, Madison, NLM, Smithsonian, Stanford, UCLA, Yale. Bergmann: Cornell.* Scheele: DSB XII.143-50; Horblit 92; Partington III.205-34; Waller 11225; Gernsheim, Hist. of Photography (1969), pp. 32-33; not in Duveen, Ferguson, Young, or E.F. Smith collections.*Bergmann: Partington III, p. 184, F. [Attributes: First Edition]

      [Bookseller: Martayan Lan, Inc]
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        Armide drame héroïque Mis en Musique par M. le Ch. Gluck. Représenté pour la première Fois par l'Académie Royale de Musique le 23 Septembre 1777.

      - Paris, Deslauriers, [1777]. In-folio (323 x 250 mm), plein vélin teinté vert de l'époque, dos lisse (accrocs de vélin aux coiffes), (1) f. de titre, (1) f. de 'catalogue de musique Deslauriers', 279 p., entièrement gravé. Edition originale partagée avec le "Bureau du Journal de Musique" de cet opéra que Gluck considérait lui-même comme son chef-d'oeuvre et qu'il composa sur un livret de Philippe Quinault, d'après "Gerusalemme liberata" du Tasse, livret déjà mis en musique par Lully en 1685. Représenté pour la première fois le 23 septembre 1777 à l'Académie Royale de Musique, il s'agit du quatrième opéra de la "période parisienne" de Gluck. C'est à l'occasion de la représentation de cet opéra que la querelle entre gluckistes et piccinnistes éclata. (Fétis, 2683. Hopkinson, ‘Bibliography of the Works of Gluck’, 45A. RISM A/I/3 G2679). Provenance : Jean-Frédéric-Auguste Lemiere de Corvey (1771-1832), avec petite signature à la plume "J.F.A. Le Miere, rue Grammont n°13". Compositeur et professeur de musique, également officier dans les campagnes napoléoniennes et spécialiste de tactique militaire, il est l'auteur de nombreux opéras comiques (cf. Grove online, art. "Lemiere" et Fétis, 'Biographie des musiciens', V, 265). Grande étiquette de veau brun de l’époque sur le plat supérieur: "Romagnat". Petite étiquette ancienne imprimée de librairie "Leduc. magasin de musique ancienne & moderne." Très bon exemplaire, frais, entièrement gravé sur cuivre, imprimé sur papier fort. [Attributes: First Edition; Soft Cover]

      [Bookseller: Librairie HATCHUEL]
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