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Displayed below are some selected recent viaLibri matches for books published in 1776

        Detail of a fresco in the 'Domus Aureus' [Pl. 32]

      Rome: Ludovico Mirri, [1776-1778]. Original engraving with modern bodycolour. Very good condition apart from a small light brown stain in the top right corner of the sheet and some mild creasing and rippling. 21 5/8 x 23 1/2 inches. 24 1/2 x 28 5/8 inches. A fine plate from 'Vestigia delle terme di Tito e loro interne pitture' of an ancient fresco from the 'Domus Aureus', Nero's sumptuous imperial complex in Rome. Situated between the Palatine and Esquiline Hills in Rome and designed by architects Severus and Celer, the Domus Aureus (Golden House) was erected by Nero in 64 AD after the great fire in Rome. The magnitude and decadent extravagance of the impressive gold-covered, jewel bedecked palace was intended to glorify the Emperor's reign. Its rooms were filled with lavish furniture and its walls and ceilings covered with decorative late- Hellenistic murals by the renowned ancient artist Fabullus. Nero, however, died in 68 AD before the Domus was totally completed. Years later, Titus (and later Trajan) built his thermal bath over its ruins, which were used as a foundation for and were partially preserved by Titus' edifice. Successive emperors continued to erect various buildings on the site and subsequently make several renovations to the Domus substructure. In 1480, practically forgotten, the Domus was excavated, and its subterranean passages and rooms thereafter became known as 'le grotte' (cave). Many of its original frescoes survived, and their motifs and ancient style of ornamentation, called 'grotteschi' (grotesque) after 'grotte', became extremely popular during the Renaissance, influencing many prominent artists such as Raphael, Michelangelo, Ghirlandio, and Pinturicchio. Published in the late eighteenth century, 'Vestigia delle terme di Tito e loro interne pitture' is an elaborate album of engravings depicting the stunning 'al fresco' and 'al stucco' murals of Nero's Domus Aureus. Carloni's colourful and beautifully rendered plates faithfully capture the grotesque style of the ancient frescoes, which was characterized by decorative borders filled with whimsical, often comical animals and foliage taken from both nature and the artist's imagination. The ornamental borders also served the practical functions of framing the central mythological, religious, or historical subject portrayed and separating the various murals in a single decorative scheme.

      [Bookseller: Donald Heald Rare Books]
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        A General Map of the Middle British Colonies

      London, 1776. No Binding. Very Good. 19 x 26 inches. Original outline color; reinforced fold separation & wear, slight losses due to abrasion, mended split into surface; nice, dark printing impression; overall very good, especially for a map originally issued folded. A scarce, handsomely engraved edition of the great Evans map intended for use by British officers serving in the American Revolution. This edition appeared as both a separate and in a work called the American Military Pocket Atlas, styled the "Holster Atlas," as it was intended to provide a geographic overview for British officers being shipped off to battle the rebellious colonists. This was a new state, second issue, of the often-used Kitchin-Jefferys-Sayer plate but with significant changes (".so strangely altered as to be almost unrecognizable,"). An important improvement in this state was the expansion of the inset at upper left to contain all of the Great Lakes not already shown on the map proper. The shapes of Lake Ontario and Erie have also been updated, and the map was expanded to include some of Canada north of the lakes. Many of the other changes, especially in the Ohio area, reintroduced Evans' original delineations that were distorted in the earlier states of the present plate. Forts are shown in abundance in New York, especially in the Lake Champlain region, and in Pennsylvania. Roads and trails are also shown throughout. Stevens Map XV, see also XIV.

      [Bookseller: Martayan Lan, Inc.]
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        Bibliotheque orientale ou Dictionnaire universel, contenant generalement tout ce qui regarde la connaissance des Peuples de l'Orient

      J.E. Dufour & P.H. Roux, Imprimeurs & Libraires, Affocies, 1776. Hardcover. Very Good. Elephant folio. Maestricht : J.E. Dufour & Ph. Roux, 1776. Bound in tan cloth. Gilt lettering on spine over dark red title plate. 5 raised bands. Six compartments. Publishers imprint and publication date on bottom of spine. Light gray endpapers. Elaborately decorated title page, with red and black lettering. Intricately detailed copperplate engravings throughout. This edition of the Bibliotheque Orientale is the second printing, created in Maastricht in the year 1776. The book was Herbelots greatest achievement, occupying most of his life. It was completed in 1697 by Antoine Galland. It is based on the immense Arabic bibliography (the Kashf al-Zunun) of Hadji Khalfa (Katip Celebi), of which it is largely an abridged translation, but also contains the substance of a vast number of other Arabic, Persian and Turkish compilations and manuscripts. Tight binding and solid boards. Minimal scuffing to boards. Small scrape along leather title plate. Slight bumping to corners. Clean, unmarked pages. Library sticker gently removed from endpaper. Slight residue remains. Minor wrinkling to pages. Minimal discoloration to pages. A beautifully preserved volume in exceptional condition. Please view our images of this rare item. Brunet II, 664.

      [Bookseller: SequiturBooks]
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        A Plan of Port Royal in South Carolina. Survey'd by Capn. John Gascoigne

      London: William Faden, [1776]. Copper-engraved sea chart on a full untrimmed sheet, in excellent condition. 32 1/2 x 25 2/3 inches. A very rare and highly detailed sea chart, the most important map of South Carolina's Port Royal Sound and Hilton Head made during the Revolutionary War, here in the first state. This very finely engraved and immensely detailed chart was superior to all other maps printed of the region, and the most important portrayal of the Port Royal Sound available in the early days of the Revolutionary War. The map embraces today's Beaufort County, with the Sound's excellent natural harbour, formed by the numerous Sea Islands, which are separated from each other by an elaborate web of tidal channels. The Broad River enters from the north, and the sound is bordered by Port Royal, Parris, and Trench's (Hilton Head) Island, and Lady's and Saint Helena Islands. In the upper-center of the image is the town of Beaufort, and numerous plantations are individually labeled. This sea chart was one of the most detailed and accurate of any such map of the American coastline. The immense detail of the hydrography was the result of surveys conducted by Captain John Gascoigne, assisted by his brother James. In 1728, aboard the HMS Alborough, he employed the most sophisticated and modern techniques with exacting attention to detail to produce a manuscript chart. The next year, this chart was altered by Francis Swaine, and it would appear that Swaine's manuscript, or a close copy of it, found its way to the London workshop of William Faden. Faden, the successor to the great Thomas Jefferys, was already one of Britain's leading cartographers and this map, present here in the first state, although undated, was printed in 1776. This chart would most certainly have been used by commanders in formulating their battle plans. This is significant, as Port Royal Sound was one of the South's finest harbours, and both sides in the conflict believed that possession of the area was of great strategic importance. Early in the war, the region had fallen under the control of the American patriots, however, in December, 1778 the British seized control of nearby Savannah, Georgia. As the new year of 1779 dawned, the British commander, General Augustin Prevost was determined to further his gains. Taking advantage of Britain's naval superiority, Prevost dispatched the HMS George Germaine with 200 marines aboard, commanded by Major Valentine Gardiner. On February 1st, they first engaged American forces at Hilton Head, who then decided to strategically withdraw up the Broad River, with the British in close pursuit. A fierce battle occurred at Bull's Plantation, forcing the Americans to retreat to the shelter of the surrounding forested swamps. Emboldened by his success, on February 2nd, Gardiner decided to attack Beaufort, which was defended by General William Moultrie. A pitched battle ensued, in which Moultrie managed to disable some of the British guns, which neutralized the British advantage. The next day, Gardiner was forced to retreat with heavy losses. On September 24th of the same year, in what was to become known as the Battle of Hilton Head, three British ships were set upon by a trio of French ships, allied to the American cause. After a dramatic chase and intense exchange of cannon fire, the principal British ship, the HMS Experiment, was forced to surrender. The area remained an important base for the American cause, and although the British conducted isolated raids along the coast, it generally remained in the possession of the American forces for the duration of the war. Guthorn, British Maps of the American Revolution, 150/17; Sellers & Van Ee, Maps & Charts of North America & West Indies, 1529; Stevens & Tree, "Comparative Cartography," 71(a), in Tooley, The Mapping of America; Cf. Cumming, British Maps of Colonial America, pp.47-49; Cumming,The Southeast in Early Maps, 204.

      [Bookseller: Donald Heald Rare Books]
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        A PLAN OF PORT ROYAL IN SOUTH CAROLINA. SURVEY'D BY CAPN. JOHN GASCOIGNE

      London: Jefferys & Faden, [1776].. Copper-engraved sea chart. Sheet size: 32 1/2 x 25 2/3 inches. In excellent condition, on a full, untrimmed sheet. A very rare and highly detailed sea chart, the most important map of South Carolina's Port Royal Sound and Hilton Head made in the early days of the Revolutionary War, in the first state. This very finely engraved and immensely detailed chart was superior to all other maps printed of the region, and the most important portrayal of the Port Royal Sound available in the early days of the Revolutionary War. The map embraces today's Beaufort County, with the Sound's excellent natural harbor, formed by the numerous Sea Islands, which are separated from each other by an elaborate web of tidal channels. The Broad River enters from the north, and the sound is bordered by Port Royal, Parris, and Trench's (Hilton Head) Island, and Lady's and Saint Helena islands. In the upper center of the image is the town of Beaufort, and numerous plantations are individually labeled. This sea chart was one of the most detailed and accurate of any such map of the American coastline. The immense detail of the hydrography was the result of surveys conducted by Captain John Gascoigne, assisted by his brother James. In 1728, aboard the H.M.S. Alborough, he employed the most sophisticated and modern techniques with exacting attention to detail to produce a manuscript chart. The next year this chart was altered by Francis Swaine, and it would appear that Swaine's manuscript, or a close copy of it, found its way to the London workshop of William Faden. Faden, the successor to the great Thomas Jefferys, was already one of Britain's leading cartographers, and this map, present here in the first state, although undated, was printed in 1776. The Port Royal Sound region has one of the most diverse and fascinating histories of any part of the American South. The region was originally the domain of the Yamasee native tribe, and was known to Europeans since 1521, when it was encountered by a Spanish expedition led by Francisco Cordillo. In 1562, Jean Ribaut led a party of Huguenot colonists to found Charlesfort on Parris Island. The French presence soon proved too close for comfort for the Spanish, who had established a base at St. Augustine in 1565. The Spanish commander, Pedro Ménendez de Avilés succeeded in crushing the French colony, establishing his own outpost of Santa Elena nearby in 1566. Santa Elena became the capital of Spanish Florida and an important Jesuit mission that sought to convert the natives to Christianity. It was finally abandoned in 1587. For a brief period in the 1680s the area was also home to a Stuart Town, the first Scottish settlement in the Americas. In 1663, Captain William Hilton, sailing from the Barbados on the Adventure, conducted a reconnaissance of the region, newly claimed by England. It was on this trip that he named "Hilton Head" after himself. In the 1670s the first governor of Carolina, William Sayle, led a party of Bermudian colonists to found the town of Port Royal. The English settlement of the region proved to be successful and enduring, and what was to become the most important town in the region, Beaufort, was founded in 1710. This chart was the finest and most detailed map available in the early days of the Revolutionary War, and would most certainly have been used by commanders in formulating their battle plans. This is significant, as Port Royal Sound was one of the South's finest harbors, and both sides in the conflict believed that possession of the area was of great strategic importance. Early in the war the region had fallen under the control of the American patriots; however, in December 1778 the British seized control of nearby Savannah, Georgia. As the new year of 1779 dawned, the British commander there, Gen. Augustin Prevost, was determined to further his gains. Taking advantage of Britain's naval superiority, Prevost dispatched the H.M.S. George Germaine with two hundred marines aboard, commanded by Major Valentine Gardiner. On February 1st they first engaged American forces at Hilton Head, who then decided to strategically withdraw up the Broad River, with the British in close pursuit. A fierce battle occurred at Bull's Plantation, forcing the Americans to retreat to the shelter of the surrounding forested swamps. Emboldened by his success, on February 2nd, Gardiner decided to attack Beaufort, which was defended by Gen. William Moultrie. A pitched battle ensued, in which Moultrie managed to disable some of the British guns, which neutralized the British advantage. The next day Gardiner was forced to retreat with heavy losses. On September 24th of the same year, in what was to become known the Battle of Hilton Head, three British ships were set upon by a trio of French ships, allied to the American cause. After a dramatic chase and intense exchange of cannon fire, the principal British ship, the H.M.S. Experiment, was forced to surrender. The area remained an important base for the American cause, and although the British conducted isolated raids along the coast, it remained in the possession of the American forces until the end of the war. SELLERS & VAN EE, MAPS & CHARTS OF NORTH AMERICA & THE WEST INDIES 1529. Steven & Tree, "Comparative Cartography" 71(a), in Tooley, THE MAPPING OF AMERICA. CUMMING, BRITISH MAPS OF COLONIAL AMERICA, pp.47-49. CUMMING, THE SOUTHEAST IN EARLY MAPS 204 (refs).

      [Bookseller: William Reese Company - Americana]
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        A Chart of Delaware Bay and River, containing a full & exact description of the shores, creeks, harbours, soundings. shoals, sands and bearings of the most considerable land marks &c. &c. Faithfully coppied from that published in Philadelphia by Joshua Fisher

      London: Printed for Robt. Sayer & Jno. Bennett, 10 July 1776. Copper engraved map, inset list of "subscribers" (i.e. list of pilots and masters who attested to the charts accuracy), tide table below the title. 20 1/4 x 28 1/2 inches. An early English issue of Fisher's famed chart of Delaware Bay, published at the outset of the Revolution. In 1756, Philadelphian and self-taught cartographer Joshua Fisher, after several years of research, published in Philadelphia his Chart of Delaware Bay from the Sea-Coast to Reedy-Island. The chart, published during the French & Indian War, was immediately suppressed by the Assembly, fearing that its falling into enemy hands would make Philadelphia a target of the French navy (accounting in part for the great rarity of the first edition). However, before being ordered to suspend the sale of the map, Fisher had in fact distributed a few copies, writing to Richard Peters in March 1756, "some few have been deliverd, before notice, as also some few sent to England." Apparently, one of the latter (or perhaps an equally rare Philadelphia second edition of circa 1775) would eventually find its way to William Faden, who would re-engrave the map and issue it in March 1776 on the eve of the Revolution." "[Fisher's chart] was without rival in the remaining years of the eighteenth century. Between 1756 and 1800, it was published in ten editions and issues of Philadelphia, London, and Paris ... [I]t came into its own in the War of the Revolution as a potential aid to the military operations of all three contestants" (Wroth). The first London issue was published by William Faden in March 1776 and closely followed the second American edition. The present issue, with Sayer and Bennett's imprint, followed a few months later. Sellers and Van Ee, Maps and Charts of North America and the West Indies 1360; Phillips, A List of Maps of America, p. 262; Snyder, COI 265b; Wroth, "Joshua Fisher's 'Chart of Delaware Bay & River'" in PMHB, vol. 74, no. 1.

      [Bookseller: Donald Heald Rare Books]
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        Bye-laws, Rules, Orders, and Directions, for the Better Government of His Majesty's Royal Hospital for Seamen at Greenwich,

      London: T. Harrison and S. Brooke,, 1776. made and confirmed at Three General Courts of the Commissioners and Governors of the said Hospital, held at the Admiralty-Office, on the 16th 18th of December, 1775, and 16th of February, 1776. Quarto (255 × 197 mm). Presentation quality binding of contemporary red morocco, raised bands, olive branch tool in compartments, broad gilt panelling to covers, milled edge-roll, similar tool to turn-ins, marbled endpapers, gilt edges. Attractive engraved head- and tailpieces. Somewhat rubbed, and a little bumped at the extremities, some skillful restoration at spine and corners, light toning to the text, remains attractive, a very good copy. First and only edition. Established under a charter of William and Mary in 1694 as the Royal Hospital for Seamen; "for the relief and support of seamen of the Royal Navy who, by wounds or other disabilities, should be incapable of further service at sea, and unable to maintain themselves; and the sustenation of widows, and the education of children of such seamen as should be slain or disabled in the King's service." The buildings were designed and begun by Christopher Wren, the project was – in the words of his assistant, Nicholas Hawksmoor – 'the darling object' of Queen Mary II, work began in 1696 and the first 40 pensioners arrived in 1705. However, the commissioners were only formally incorporated under a charter of George III in 1775 and the present document represents their first efforts to establish the institution on practical, modern grounds; "This charter grants powers to finish the building; to provide for seamen, either within or out of the Hospital; to make bye-laws, &c. &c. It is provided by the charter, that all the officers of the Hospital shall be seafaring men; the office of the directors is defined to be, to inspect the carrying on of the buildings; to state the accounts, and to make contracts; and to place the boys out as apprentices. The internal regulation of the Hospital to be in the Governor and Council, as before mentioned. This charter was followed by an Act of Parliament, which vested in the commissioners thus incorporated, all the estates held in trust for the benefit of the Hospital" (Lysons, 'Greenwich,' The Environs of London, volume 4, Counties of Herts, Essex & Kent). It is interesting that the period of incorporation and the publication of these Bye-laws overlaps with the appointment of James Cook as the Fourth Captain of the Hospital. He had just returned from his Second Voyage and "was promoted to post captain on 9 August 1775 and appointed fourth captain of Greenwich Hospital, an appointment he accepted with the proviso that it would not preclude him from being considered for further service" (ODNB). The position was essentially a sinecure, with the Captains charged with such generalizations as to "assist the Governor and Lieutenant-Governor," "frequently to visit all the wards, and see that good order and discipline be kept therein," and "to see that all the rules and orders of the Hospital be duly observed." In any case Cook came out of retirement early in 1776, taking command of a further voyage to the Pacific with the "purpose that an attempt should be made to find out a Northern Passage by Sea from the Pacific to the Atlantic Ocean," the voyage from which he did not return. Although it is unlikely that Cook had any influence over the nature of these arrangements, they do show that his enlightened concern for the welfare of his men was a tendency that was beginning to find wider acceptance. Uncommon ESTC records just 6 copies in the UK - BL, NLW, NMM, House of Lords Library, and two copies at the Wellcome - a copy in the Bibliothèque Nationale, and 5 in the USA - LoC, National Library of Medicine, Huntington, Society of the Cincinnati and University of Minnesota.

      [Bookseller: Peter Harrington]
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        Carte Nouvelle de L'Amerique Angloise contenant tout ce que les Anglois possedent sur le Continent de L'Amerique Septentrionale savoir le Canada, la Nouvelle Ecosse ou Acadie, les treize Provinces unies ... avec la Floride

      Augsburg: [1776]. Copper engraved map, period hand-colouring. 27 7/8 x 22 5/8 inches. Lotter's attractive map of the British Colonies at the start of the Revoloutionary War, here with beautiful contemporary hand colouring Each of the thirteen Colonies is identified by name both on the map, and in the title. The title is placed within an attractive decorative border surmounted by the British Royal arms. The French title and nomenclature indicates that Lotter, a leading German mapmaker, intended this for the French market, as does the fact that he limits the claims of the British to the regions east of the Appalachian Mountains.The delineation of the thirteen "Provinces unies" is generally well done (although Maryland and Georgia are both strangely shaped): a number of locations are named in the Ohio Valley, including Logs Town, Twictwees, Ft. Du Quesne, Allegheny, Vinango, Buffaloons, Sandoski and Mingos. Some interesting details are also shown in the region of the Great Lakes. McCorkle, New England in Early Printed Maps 776.19; cf. Phillips, A List of Maps of America, p. 3517; Sellers & Van Ee, Maps and Charts of North America and the West Indies 141.

      [Bookseller: Donald Heald Rare Books ]
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        Sacrorum bibliorum concordantiae juxta esemplar vulgatae editiones Sicti V. Pontificis Maximi jussu re cognitum et Clementis VIII. authritate editum

      Bambergae: Matthaei Rieger, 1776. Gebunden. Augustae Vindelicorum 24x37 cm gest. Titel 5 cm Buchblock berieben Ruecken oben etwas eingerissen leicht wasserrandig Text nicht beschaedigt

      [Bookseller: Buchhandlung Antiquariat Sawhney]
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        OEUVRES DIVERSES.

      - Londres, s.e., 1776, 8.5x14, sept volumes. Reliure en plein veau. Dos à 5 nerfs, élégamment orné de motifs dorés. Pièces de titre et de tomaison sur maroquin rouge. Filet sur les coupes. Tranches marbrées. Quelques feuillets sur papier bleu. Bon exemplaire malgré quelques accros à certaine coiffe et un petit trou de ver sur le dos d'un volume. Envoi de photographies sur demande. [Attributes: Hard Cover]

      [Bookseller: Librairie de l'Univers]
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        Observations on the Nature of Civil Liberty...

      Observations on the Nature of Civil Liberty, the Principles of Government, and the Justice and Policy of the War with America. To Which Is Added an Appendix, Containing A State of the National Debt, an Estimate of the Money drawn from the Public by the Taxes, and an Account of the National Income and Expenditure since the last War. London Printed, 1776. Philadelphia, Re printed and Sold by John Dunlap, at the Newest Printing-Office, in Market-Street. MDCCLXXVI. Pamphlet (19.5 x 12 cm), remnants of binding cords, traces of hide glue along spine, light foxing, no marginal tears, a good to very good copy. Collation: 1 preliminary leaf: title page, 'Advertisement', 3-71, [1] (blank). [Evans:p699,n15032; Howes:P-585].

      [Bookseller: Bauer Rare Books]
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        JOURNAL OF THE PROCEEDINGS OF THE CONGRESS HELD AT PHILADELPHIA, MAY 10, 1775. PUBLISHED BY ORDER OF THE CONGRESS

      Philadelphia, Printed; London: Re-printed for J. Almon, 1776.. [4],200pp., with page numbers 159-168 repeated. Half title. Later marbled wrappers. A clean, fresh copy. Very good, untrimmed. In a half morocco box. This journal records the transactions of Congress for the period from May 10 to Aug. 1, 1775. Includes, among other items, the draft of the address of the Congress to the Six Confederated Indian Nations stating the grievances against Britain, the "Declaration...setting forth the causes and necessities of their taking up Arms," the rules and regulations of the Continental Army, the appointment of Washington as commander in chief, the Olive Branch Petition, etc. AMERICAN CONTROVERSY 75-151b. HOWES J264. SABIN 15543.

      [Bookseller: William Reese Company - Americana]
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        The Theatre of War in North America, with the Roads, and a Table of Distances ... A Compendious Account of the British Colonies in North-America

      London: R. Sayer & J. Bennett, 20 March 1776. Engraved map, period hand- colouring in outline. Inset table of distances titled "Evan's Polymetric Table of America." Three columns of letterpress text beneath the map titled "A Compendious Account of the British Colonies in North-America" including a small table of the populations of the colonies at the bottom of the middle column. 30 1/2 x 22 1/2 inches. Rare broadside map published early in the war to satisfy the public demand for news relating to the Revolution in the colonies. "This map was published in early 1776 and sold in the streets of London for one shilling. It had text printed below the map which described colonies in detail" (Nebenzahl, Atlas of the American Revolution). The map itself is based largely on the French mapping by D'Anville (see Faden's map after D'Anville in Sayer and Bennett's American Atlas), although apparently also borrows from other sources. It depicts the colonies from Labrador to East Florida and as far west as a vast Louisiana. The complicated table of distances was no doubt included on the map to give the British public a better understanding of the vastness of the American continent, and in turn of the large scale of the theatre of war. The text below the map is quite interesting, describing the limits of each colony and their respective principal towns, harbours, rivers, etc. The small population table includes a breakdown not only of the total populations of each colony, but also the number of both white and African American men "able to bear arms." Stevens and Tree note three issues of this first edition of the map, with the present example being their earliest, also noting a succeeding edition dated November 1776 cut from an entirely new plate. Stevens & Tree, "Comparative Cartography" 58a, in Tooley, The Mapping of America; Phillips, A List of Maps of America, p. 588; Nebenzahl, Atlas of the American Revolution, endpapers; Sellers & Van Ee, Maps and Charts of North America and the West Indies 145; McCorkle, New England in Early Printed Maps 776.26.

      [Bookseller: Donald Heald Rare Books]
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        A Map of the Middle British Colonies In North America...March 25th, 1776

      London, 1776. No Binding. Near Fine. 19 1/8 x 32 inches.. Original outline color; minor marginal mends not affecting image; else excellent. Rare. This is by far the most important edition of the pioneering Evans map outside of the original one, which was called by Schwartz "the most ambitious performance of its kind undertaken in America up to that time." Of the numerous later editions of map, Pownall's was the only one to utilize the original plate and to have been authorized by Evans himself. In the upper left corner is a commendation of the map with Evans' engraved signature. Pownall's map is in fact a novel hybrid, consisting of Evans' original plate with a new plate for part of the Northeast appended to it. Pownall also significantly updated the original plate: "The whole of the map east of the longitude of Philadelphia is greatly changed, and is filled in with new details" (Stevens). Pownall, who had been governor of Massachusetts, stated that the New England section of the map was based on new information, "later Draughts and Surveys deposited at the Board of Trade" (Pownall's Topographical Description, in which the map was originally published). Sadly, Evans saw little profit from his groundbreaking map, in large part due to the numerous pirated editions of it by Jefferys, Sayer, Kitchen, Bowles and others. So moved was Pownall by the plight of the wronged and indigent Evans, who received no funds from the sale of the numerous piracies of his map, that he pledged all profits from his edition of the map to Evans' daughter. Stevens, H. Lewis Evans His Map, pp.17-28; Schwartz/Ehrenberg, p.1

      [Bookseller: Martayan Lan, Inc.]
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        PRINCIPIOS MILITARES

      Barcelona, Eulalia Piferrer Viuda, 1776.. en que se explican las operaciones de la guerra subterranea, o el modo de dirigir, fabricar, y usar las minas y contra-minas en el ataque y defensa de las plazas. Dispuestos para la instruccion de la ilustre juventud del Real Cuerpo de Artilleria. FIRST EDITION, 1776. Small 4to, 210 x 140 mm, 8¼ x 5½ inches, 24 folding engraved plates and plans, pages (30), 286, Spanish text, bound in full antique mottled leather, raised bands and gilt decoration to spine, gilt lettered morocco label, all edges red, marbled endpapers. Head and tail of spine and corners slightly rubbed, cover edges slightly worn, several scrapes to surface of upper cover, ink ownership stamp to half-title, top of title page and lower margin of page 15, small correction to 2 words, few pale brown marks to final page of text, small light stain to lower blank corner of last 4 plates, otherwise contents fine and bright, a couple of plates protruding slightly from text block. Binding tight and firm. A very good copy. A scarce Spanish technical military book. The author Don Raimundo Sanz is described on the title page as Cabellero del Orden de Santiago, Mariscal de Campo de los Exercitos de S. M., y Coronel del Real Cuerpo de Artilleria. MORE IMAGES ATTACHED TO THIS LISTING.

      [Bookseller: Roger Middleton]
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        Sgarzavolg: d: Ciuffetto Maschio [Tufted gray and golden yellow male Heron] [Pl. 419]

      [Florence: Giuseppe Vanni, 1776]. Etching, with engraving, coloured by hand, after Vanni, Lorenzi or Manetti. Very good condition apart from some very light foxing. 13 1/4 x 10 5/8 inches. 18 1/8 x 14 inches. A fine image from "one of the half-dozen or so great bird books" (Fine Bird Books). This beautiful plate comes from Storia naturale degli uccelli, of which Peter Dance writes, "The production of its five massive folio volumes must have been one of the most remarkable publishing ventures ever undertaken in Florence. Begun in 1767, and [based on birds taken from the collection of Giovanni Gerini], it was completed ten years later. It was larger, better engraved and more vividly coloured than any previous work on birds, but these are not its only claim to fame. The attitudes of the birds themselves give this book its unique character. Strutting, parading, posturing, and occasionally flying...are birds whose real-life counterparts would surely disown them, and not without reason, for Manetti seems in these pictures to be depicting the human comedy, the habits and mannerisms of contemporary Italian society. His book may still be rated among the very greatest bird books, if only for its magnificent comicality" (S. Peter Dance, The Art of Natural History: Animal Illustrators and their Work, London: 1978). Cf. Dance, 70; cf. Fine Bird Books (1990), p.92; cf. Nissen, IVB, 588; cf. Wood, p.450; cf. Zimmer, p.241.

      [Bookseller: Donald Heald Rare Books]
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        Autograph Document Signed, in Italian, oblong 8vo, Modena. June 18, 1777

      As a professor, Scarpa acknowledges a student?s enrollment. ?I, the Professor of Obstetrics signed below, certify hereby that Claudia Rovespi from the Concordia was enrolled in my school for the two years 1776-1777, attended regularly and studied diligently.? Signed ?Antonio Scarpa.?

      [Bookseller: David Schulson Autographs]
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        LORD KAMES. SIX SKETCHES ON THE HISTORY OF MAN. CONTAINING, THE PROGRESS OF MEN AS INDIVIDUALS ... WITH AN APPENDIX, CONCERNING, THE PROPAGATION OF ANIMALS, AND THE CARE OF THEIR OFFSPRING. (G)

      Philadelphia: R. Bell and R. Aitken,. Very Good with no dust jacket. 1776. First US Edition. Hardcover. Animal Husbandry; Law; Jurisprudence; We fit archival quality clear acrylic covers for additional protection whenever possible. ; 8vo 8" - 9" tall; vii and 262 (ii) pages; Lord Kames. Six Sketches on the History of Man. Containing, the Progress of Men as Individuals ... With an Appendix, Concerning, the Propagation of Animals, and the Care of their Offspring. Philadelphia: R. Bell and R. Aitken, 1776. First U. S. Edition. 8vo, original calf, vii and 262 (ii) pages including half-title and publisher's ad leaf at rear. Covers scuffed, lacking some spine segments, minor peeling at edges, text still good, solid with moderate browning throughout, mild foxing. Provenance- 1785 ink ownership of Luke Morris, Jr. At front free endpaper and at first leaf of text, later pencil and ink ownership signatures at front pastedown. Evans 14801. Sabin 32702. First volume (all published, of four intended) from 1774 London initial edition (two volumes in 4to) , text was meant not "for the learned; they are above it: Nor for the vulgar; they are below it. It is intended for men, who ... Are bent on useful knowledge; who, even in the delirium of youth, feel the dawn of patriotism, and who, in riper years, enjoy its meridian wealth." Kames and Adam Smith were the chief 18th Scottish exponents of the historical method in jurisprudence and moral philosophy. This volume introduced Americans to the developing science of natural history, coupled with what can best be described as knowledge gained from observation and experience without preconceptions or intransigent religious or moral biases. Quite scarce: no copies in recorded auction records of the last several decades; only one copy cited in OCLC (but there are copies at AAS, Library Company of Philadelphia, and the Library of Congress). Morris (1760-1802) was commissioned as a captain in the Fifth Battalion, Philadelphia Militia, in 1785. His house, "Peckham", was in Southwark. His widow moved to Germantown where she raised their son and five daughters; one daughter, Elizabeth Carrington Morris, became a noted American botanist (working with Asa Gray) , and another daughter, Susan Sophia Morris, married John Stockton Littell who edited several volumes dealing with the Revolutionary War. The later signatures at the front pastedown are those of Susan Littell, and her son, T. Gardner Littell, who was to be a minister in Dover. Graphic of Title Page available. .

      [Bookseller: poor mans books]
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        THEORIE DES JARDINS

      Paris: Pissot, 1776.. 1st edn. 8vo. Rebound in recent gilt lettered quarter brown calf on marbled paper-laid boards (Fine). Pp. 397 (new endpapers; some light spotting to pages edges; no inscriptions). .

      [Bookseller: Rothwell & Dunworth Ltd]
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        Opera quaedam reliqua (Vortitel: Opera quaedam geometrica. Post mortem ejus impensis Philippi Comitis Stanhope impressa). Scilicet, I. Apollonii Pergoli de sectione determinata libri II restituti, duobus insuper libris aucti. II. Porismatum liber ... III. De logarithmis liber. IV. De limitibus quantitatum et rationum, fragmentum. V. Appendix pauca continens problemata ad illustrandam praecipue veterum geometrarum analysin. Nunc primum post auctoris mortem in lucem edita cura Jacobi Clow

      Glasgow, Foulis 1776. 24 cm. (4), 10, (2), 594, 34, (2), 33, (3 w.), 23, (1 w.) Seiten mit Kupfer-Porträt von A. Baillie nach de Nune und zahlreichen Textfiguren. Festeinband, Ledereinband der Zeit mit floraler Rückenvergold., vergold. Supralibros und farbig Rückensch. - Brunet V, 399 - Encycl. Brit. 11.ed. 25, 137 - Cantor III, 509 - Lowndes IX, 2403 - Erstausgabe. Aus dem Nachlaß des berühmten schottischen Mathematikers herausgegeben, auf Kosten des Herausgebers, nicht für den Handel, gedruckt. "Simson's contributions to mathematical knowledge took the form of critical editions and commentaries on the works of the ancient geometers ... After his death restorations of Apollonius's treatise "De sectione determinata" and of Euclid's treatise "De porismatibus" were printed for private circulation in 1776 at the expense of Earl Stanhope ... The volume contains also dissertations on "Logarithms" and on the "Limit of Quantities and Ratios", and a few problems illustrative of the ancient geometrical analysis" (Encycl. Brit.) Kanten leicht berieben, Gelenke restauriert, sonst gut erhaltenes und fleckenfreies Exemplar. Die Supralibri in Goldprägung zeigen vor einem bekrönten Wappenmantel das Wappenschild, darauf quer ein Schachbalken, um das Wappenschild der Spruch "Honi Soit Qui Mal Y Pense"; auf dem Innnendeckel gestochenes Exlibris mit bekröntem 8teiligem Wappenschild, ein großes und 2 kleine Felder wiederum mit dem Schachbalken, 3 Felder mit Löwen, 1 Feld mit Kreuzen. - Sprache / Language: Lateinisch / Latin -

      [Bookseller: Wenner Antiquariat]
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        A Plan of the Attack of Fort Sulivan, near Charles Town in South Carolina. by a Squadron of His Majesty's Ships, on the 28th June 1776. with the Disposition of the King's Land Forces, and the Encampments and Entrenchments of the Rebels from the Drawings made on the Spot

      London: "Printed and sold by William Faden, Successor to the late Mr. Thomas Jefferies, Geographer to the King...", 10th August 1776. Copper- engraved map, engraved one-line dedication to Sir Peter Parker and letterpress text in two columns beneath the map. Inset plan of the fort. 20 7/8 x 16 1/2 inches. Extremely rare first issue of a separately- published Revolutionary War broadside battle plan depicting a critical altercation near Charleston, South Carolina. This highly important and finely engraved and letterpress broadside map captures the dramatic action surrounding the British naval assault on Fort Sullivan (called here "Sulivan"), the strategic key to Charleston. In the Spring of 1776, South Carolina had fallen into the firm possession of the Americans, a reality the British were determined to challenge. They dispatched a fleet of twenty ships (although only nine were armed) under Commodore Peter Parker, manned by marines, with the mission under the overall command of Maj. General Sir Henry Clinton. The ships moored in Five Fathom Hole, and landed on Long Island, which lay to the north of Sullivan's Island. Meanwhile, practical considerations indicated that the Patriot defenders were in considerable trouble. Led by Col. William Moultrie, the Americans were short of experienced troops and ammunition. Fort Sullivan, located on the southern tip of the island of the same name had to be held, otherwise Charleston would surely fall. While the elegant plan of the fort, located in the inset at the upper left of the map, makes it appear to be a well designed bastion, it was in reality cobbled together with palmetto logs. Moultrie had a total of 1,125 men against the 2,900 British marines. More worryingly, the fort had only 26 guns, with only 28 rounds of ammunition per gun against the British fleet's 270 well-stocked cannon. Fortunately for the Americans, the British proceeded to make a series of strategic errors. Clinton, who relied on information given by harbour pilots who were press-ganged into service, spent days looking for a non-existent ford between Long and Sullivan's Island, which in reality was prevented by the presence of a seven foot deep channel. This bought the Americans time, which allowed American Col. William Thomson to fortify the northern tip of the island, as indicated on the map. On June 28th, the British mounted their full on naval assault of the fort, as indicated on the map by the ships shown grouped together just off of the fort, with each ship being named and detailed with its number of guns. Moultrie wisely rationed and synchronized the use of his limited firepower, such that the British met heavier than expected resistance. Unfamiliar with the tidal shoals that lay near the fort, the British ships were unable to sail in close enough to the fort to deliver lethal blows, while remaining in range of the American guns. Amazingly, many of the British rounds which did strike the fort were harmlessly absorbed into the structure's spongy palmetto logs. The British flagship HMS Bristol took heavy losses, and another ship ran aground and had to be abandoned. Another British attempt to storm Thomson's northern positions with a raid by long boats was easily repelled. The British were forced to completely withdraw, and promptly set sail for New York. This copy is the very rare first state (of four known issues) of the map, which was the first Revolutionary battle plan to be drafted by William Faden. The text in two columns is found only on this issue and gives an account of the action taken from a letter by Parker to Lieutenant General Clinton. This issue was separately published as a broadside giving news of the battle to a British audience eager for information about the war; later issues, without text, appeared in Faden's North American Atlas. Nebenzahl, Atlas of the American Revolution, map 8; Nebenzahl, A Bibliography of Printed Battle Plans of the American Revolution 1775-1795, 64; Stevens & Tree, "Comparative Cartography," 14(a), in Tooley, The Mapping of America.

      [Bookseller: Donald Heald Rare Books]
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        Les A Propos de Societé ou Chansons de M.L**** Tom. I [II]. [Subtitle]: Together with: Les A Propos de La Folie ou Chansons Grotesques, Grivoises et Annonces de Parade

      [Paris]. [1776]. 3 volumes. Octavo. Contemporary gilt-ruled mottled calf with spines in decorative compartments gilt, triple gilt rules to boards, marbled edges. 1f. (title), [iii]-x, 1f. (engraved plate), 302 pp.; 1f. (title), 1f. (engraved plate), 316 pp.; 1f. (title), [iii]-vi, 1f. (engraved plate), 319, [i] pp. With errata to all three volumes. & & With fine engraved pictorial frontispieces, title pages and smaller engravings, after Moreau, throughout, including charming depictions of contemporary French society. Head- and tailpieces throughout. With the small bookplate of Douglas Maxwell Moffatt to front pastedowns of each volume. & & Contains the melody and text to 264 chansons.& & Slightly worn, rubbed and bumped; spines slightly chipped at head and tail. Spotting to several leaves in Vol. III; some minor foxing. A very good and attractive copy overall. . First Edition. Lesure p. 661. RISM Recueils BII p. 97 (one copy of all three volumes in the U.S. and Great Britain).& & An elegantly-printed collection.

      [Bookseller: J & J Lubrano Music Antiquarians LLC]
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        A DISCOURSE UPON SOME LATE IMPROVEMENTS OF THE MEANS FOR PRESERVING THE HEALTH OF MARINERS. DELIVERED AT THE ANNIVERSARY MEETING OF THE ROYAL SOCIETY

      London: Printed for the Royal Society, 1776.. [4],44pp. Half title. Small quarto. 20th-century three- quarter calf over marbled boards, gilt label. Leaf C4 (signed C3) a cancel, as usual. Occasional minor foxing, ink stain on p.2. A very good copy, bound with five other works by Pringle, listed below. Extremely rare. One of the most significant of all the printed works relating to Cook's voyages and their importance. This is the first appearance in print of Cook's epoch- making account of the successful measures taken against scurvy on his first two voyages. There were several later versions and translations, but the original edition of this milestone publication has long been acknowledged as a major rarity. The paper on scurvy was read to the Royal Society by its president, Sir John Pringle (in the absence of Cook himself, then just beginning his final voyage), as the year's Copley medal award winner, and immediately published in this form. Pringle's long presentation address, quoting directly from Cook and other sources, is followed by Cook's paper and an extract from a letter by Cook to Pringle written from Plymouth Sound in July 1776. The paper subsequently appeared in the official account of the second voyage and in the PHILOSOPHICAL TRANSACTIONS of the Royal Society. In 1783 a series of six of Pringle's discourses at the annual presentations of the Copley medal was published in one volume. "In Pringle's discourse on preserving the health of mariners he includes the first printing of Captain Cook's important paper entitled: 'The Method taken for preserving the Health of the Crew of His Majesty's Ship the Resolution during her late Voyage round the World.' In this paper, which Cook communicated to Pringle, President of the Royal Society, Cook describes the supplies carried on the voyage and his maintenance of the cleanliness of his ship and crew. It was included by Pringle in his discourse commemorating Cook's receipt of the Copley medal" - Norman sale. The winning of the battle against scurvy was one of the most important achievements in the general field of exploration. It made possible the major voyages that followed. As Robert Hughes so aptly put it in THE FATAL SHORE: "malt juice and pickled cabbage put Europeans in Australia as microchip circuitry would put Americans on the moon." This copy is very appropriately accompanied by five other Royal Society discourses of the period. A DISCOURSE... is here bound chronologically with five other Pringle first editions: A DISCOURSE ON THE DIFFERENT KINDS OF AIR (1774), A DISCOURSE ON THE TORPEDO (1775), A DISCOURSE ON THE ATTRACTION OF MOUNTAINS (1775), A DISCOURSE ON THE INVENTION AND IMPROVEMENTS OF THE REFLECTING TELESCOPE (1778), and A DISCOURSE ON THE THEORY OF GUNNERY (1778). The Streeter- Norman copy of the DISCOURSE...FOR PRESERVING THE HEALTH OF MARINERS was also bound with these five additional works by Pringle. STREETER SALE 2410. NORMAN SALE 378. GARRISON-MORTON 2156, 3714. BEDDIE 1290. HOLMES 20. KROEPELIEN 1065.

      [Bookseller: William Reese Company - Americana]
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        THE JOURNALS OF THE PROCEEDINGS OF CONGRESS. HELD AT PHILADELPHIA, FROM JANUARY TO MAY, 1776

      Philadelphia: Printed by R. Aitken, 1776.. Four parts bound in one volume. [2],93; 70; 73-146; 147-237pp. Original drab paper boards. Corners lightly worn, some soiling. Text lightly toned with some scattered foxing. Closed tear to p.113 of third part. Discreet library release stamp on rear pastedown. Very good, in original condition. Untrimmed. In a half morocco box. Through 1775 the Bradford family had the contract to print the Journals of Congress, but beginning with these Journals the contract was moved to Robert Aitken. He issued these Journals in monthly parts, although whole runs generally disposed with the monthly titles issued in February and March (as here; none were issued in January and April). After April, Aitken was told to cease publication. According to his "Waste Book" at the Library Company of Philadelphia, Aitken sold a total of eighty copies of this edition. In the fall of 1776, Congress charged Aitken to reprint all of its earlier Journals from 1774 through April 1776 as the first volume of a collected journals of Congress. With this publication in the works (it ultimately appeared with a 1777 imprint), Aitken disposed of the leftover original January to April edition as waste paper to the Army to be used for cartridges - hence the name "Cartridge Paper" edition. Given that only eighty copies survived, this is possibly the rarest of all early Journals of Congress. Needless to say, the Journals of the first four months of 1776 cover some of the most critical early moments of the Revolution. Included are communications with Washington at Boston, provisions for raising troops and supplies to fight the war, the beginning of sanctioning privateering, discussion of Indian relations, information from and letters to Committees of Correspondence, first actions against Loyalists, discussions of the failure of the assault on Canada, and many other things relative to the conduct of the war. EVANS 15145.

      [Bookseller: William Reese Company - Americana]
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        JOURNAL OF THE VOTES AND PROCEEDINGS, AS WELL OF THE COMMITTEE OF SAFETY, AT A SITTING IN JANUARY, 1776, AS THE PROVINCIAL CONGRESS OF NEW-JERSEY, AT A SITTING AT NEW-BRUNSWICK, BEGAN JANUARY 31, AND CONTINUED TO THE SECOND DAY OF MARCH FOLLOWING. PUBLISHED BY ORDER

      New-York: Printed by John Anderson, 1776.. 146,[1]pp. Gathered signatures, string-tied, as issued. Slight abrasion along gutter of titlepage. Occasional light tanning, final four leaves stained. Ink ownership stamp on one text page. Tear in upper margin of leaf H, affecting four words. Overall, very good. In original condition, untrimmed. In a blue half morocco and cloth box. The rare journal of the votes and proceedings of the New Jersey Provincial Congress, from January 9 to March 2, 1776. The Provincial Congress sat at Princeton January 9-13, then reconvened at New Brunswick through the month of February. Most of the actions taken deal with the mechanics of taking control of the government, and in particular military preparedness, including the appointment of officers in the New Jersey militia, the incarceration of prisoners of war, the problems posed by Loyalists, the disposition of captured naval prizes, and assistance to forces in New York. There is also much correspondence with New Jersey county committees, other state committees, and the Continental Congress. A critical chronicle of the New Jersey road to independence. The Congress had this work printed by patriot printer John Anderson in New York, presumably in March 1776. No copy has appeared at auction since the Thomas Streeter copy in 1967 ($800 to Nebenzahl). EVANS 14913. NAIP w019964. SABIN 53139. STREETER SALE 925.

      [Bookseller: William Reese Company - Americana]
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        [MANUSCRIPT DOCUMENT IN THE HAND OF RICHARD HENRY LEE, SIGNED BY HIM AND BY HIM ON BEHALF OF FRANCIS LIGHTFOOT LEE AND THOMAS NELSON, JR., RELATING TO EFFORTS TO RESOLVE THE CONFLICT OVER THE PENNSYLVANIA-VIRGINIA BOUNDARY]

      [Philadelphia. June 1776].. [1]p. manuscript on a folio sheet. Sheet inlaid. Several tape repairs on verso, mostly to repair closed tears along folds. A few small chips in the right margin, touching a letter of text. Faint dampstains. Good. In a half morocco and cloth folding case, spine gilt. A highly important manuscript document relating to the long-standing dispute regarding the Pennsylvania- Virginia boundary. This document, undated but written in June 1776, shows the divisiveness that existed between two of the most important American colonies on the eve of the Declaration of Independence, and the efforts being made to resolve it by some of the leading supporters of independence. By the summer of 1776 the Pennsylvania- Virginia boundary had been in dispute for nearly a century. In fact, the issue was not definitively settled until the Civil War and the creation of the state of West Virginia. The issue originated in the ambiguous terms of the 1681 grant to William Penn, which conflicted with Virginia's claim to lands "from sea to sea, west and northwest," over any territory not covered by royal grants. Prior to the French and Indian War of the 1750s, Virginia claimed most of what is now southwestern Pennsylvania, and attempted to settle it. The surveying of the Mason-Dixon line the following decade did little to alleviate the dispute, as it indicated that Pennsylvania extended some distance west of the Allegheny Mountains. In 1773, Pennsylvania established Westmoreland County in the disputed territory, and the following year Virginia took possession of Fort Pitt and the Westmoreland County seat, arresting the justices who refused to recognize the jurisdiction of Virginia. The dispute almost boiled into open warfare in 1774-75, as the last colonial governor, Lord Dunmore, sought to bring the Virginia frontier under control. In 1776, Pennsylvania proposed that a temporary boundary, "as nearly correspondent to the true one as possible such as will 'do no injury to either party,'" should be established. The present document is the response of three of the Virginia delegates to the Continental Congress, who received the proposal. The document is in the hand of Richard Henry Lee, who has signed it himself, and has also added the signatures of two of his fellow Virginia delegates, Thomas Nelson, Jr., and his brother, Francis Lightfoot Lee. The text reads: "The Virginia Delegates have received the proposal for establishing a temporary boundary between the States of Virginia and Pennsylvania and for answer, say, their power is ended; having been expressly limited to the line already proposed to the honorable Convention of the State of Pennsylvania as a temporary boundary. That they will without delay transmit the proposal of the honorable Committee to the Governor and Council of the Commonwealth of Virginia, in order to its being laid before the General Assembly that meets early in October next; and in the mean time they wish that the influence of both governments may be exerted to preserve friendship and peace between the people of both States on the controverted Boundary." At the time this proposal was considered, Richard Henry Lee, Francis Lightfoot Lee, and Thomas Nelson, Jr. were all representing Virginia in the Second Continental Congress, and all three men would affix their signatures to the Declaration of Independence the following month. Richard Henry Lee, in fact, formally put forth the motion on June 7, calling on the Congress to declare independence. A highly important step on the road to independence, suspending a dramatic conflict between two of the leading colonies about to become the United States.

      [Bookseller: William Reese Company - Americana]
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        Oca di vario colore d:Lombardella [Multi-coloured Goose] [Pl. 560]

      [Florence: Giuseppe Vanni, 1776]. Etching, with engraving, coloured by hand, after Vanni, Lorenzi or Manetti. Very good condition apart from some very light foxing. 12 1/4 x 10 1/2 inches. 18 x 14 inches. A fine image from "one of the half-dozen or so great bird books" (Fine Bird Books). This beautiful plate comes from 'Storia naturale degli uccelli', of which Peter Dance writes "The production of its five massive folio volumes must have been one of the most remarkable publishing ventures ever undertaken in Florence. Begun in 1767, and [based on birds taken from the collection of Giovanni Gerini], it was completed ten years later. It was larger, better engraved and more vividly coloured than any previous work on birds, but these are not its only claim to fame. The attitudes of the birds themselves give this book its unique character. Strutting, parading, posturing, and occasionally flying....are birds whose real-life counterparts would surely disown them, and not without reason, for Manetti seems in these pictures to be depicting the human comedy, the habits and mannerisms of contemporary Italian society. His book may still be rated among the very greatest bird books, if only for its magnificent comicality" (S. Peter Dance, The Art of Natural History: Animal Illustrators and their Work. London: 1978) Cf. Dance 70; cf. Fine Bird Books (1990) p.92; cf. Nissen IVB 588; cf. Wood p.450; cf. Zimmer p.241

      [Bookseller: Donald Heald Rare Books]
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        Voyage en Sicile et a Malthe, fait en l'année 1770. Trad. de l'Anglois par M. DEMEUNIER

      Amsterdam, Harrevelt 1776.. Ed. revue & corrigée, sur la troisieme faite en Angleterre: dans laquelle en a rétabli tous les passages tronqués, ou entièrement omis par le Traducteur. 2 Bde. in 1 geb. Tit., XVI, 300 (4); 2 Bll., 2 Bll., 260 (4) S. Mit 1 mehrf. gefalt. Kupferkarte u. 1 gefalt. Kupfertaf. HLdr. d. Zt. m. goldgepr. Rückensch. Cox I, 143; vgl. Mira I, 133; Graesse I, 560 - Erschienen ein Jahr nach der ersten franz. Ausgabe. Die EA erschien in London 1773 (vgl. Graesse). Enthält auch die in der Pariser Ausgabe vom Übersetzer ausgelassenen Teile. Die Karte zeigt die Liparischen Inseln, Sizilien und Malta. Die in briefstellerischer Form verfaßte Reisebeschreibung berichtet von Naturereignissen wie Ausbrüchen des Ätna, Erdbeben etc., Schilderungen v. Syrakus, Malta, Agrigente, Palermo u. den dort befindlichen Antiquitäten; vom Fest der Hl. Rosalia; vom Fischfang, Banditenwesen, landwirtschafltichen Erzeugnissen in Sizilien u.v.m.

      [Bookseller: Antiquariat Burgverlag]
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        Common Sense; Addressed to the Inhabitants of America, on the following interesting Subjects

      Philadelphia Printed, Newbury Port, Reprinted, By John Mycall, and to be Sold at the Printing Office, [1776]. 61,[1]pp. Gathered signatures, stitched, as issued. Untrimmed. Some soiling and contemporary ink markings to half title and titlepage. In a red morocco slip case. A wonderful contemporary American edition of Thomas Paine's famous Common Sense. One of the dozen such editions produced in America in 1776 after the initial Philadelphia editions issued by Bell and Bradford, All American editions from 1776 are quite rare, and many provincial editions such as this are possibly rarer than the first ones. Common Sense was first issued by the Philadelphia printer Bell on January 9, 1776. By Feb. 14, Bell had issued a third edition, but Paine had deserted his original publisher for W. and T. Bradford, who had gone along with his wishes in adding considerable material to the text, increasing it "upwards of one Third." It is this Bradford text, with several appendices and "An Address to the People Called Quakers" which was reprinted in the present Newburyport edition. It is impossible to fix the point of issue of the Newburyport edition, but it appears in two forms, one with the imprint of Samuel Phillips of Andover, and one with the imprint as here, for John Mycall, a resident of Newburyport and the actual printer. It was probably issued in the early spring however, since Paine had invited other printers to republish it, and it was almost instantly famous. It is almost unnecessary to comment on the importance of Common Sense. The political rhetoric of Paine inflamed the desire for independence, calling for it in clear language which swept the country like wildfire. The editors of the Grolier 100 remark, "It is not too much to say that the Declaration of Independence...was due more to Paine's Common Sense than to any other single piece of writing." Grolier American 100, 14; Gimbel CS-42; Howes P17; Evans 14961; American Independence 222o; DAB XIII, pp.398-99.

      [Bookseller: Donald Heald Rare Books]
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        COMMON SENSE; ADDRESSED TO THE INHABITANTS OF AMERICA, ON THE FOLLOWING INTERESTING SUBJECTS

      Philadelphia, Printed; Newbury Port, Reprinted, by John Mycall, and to be Sold at the Printing Office, [1776].. 61,[1]pp. Half title. Gathered signatures, stitched, as issued. Some soiling and contemporary ink markings on half title and titlepage, else very good. Untrimmed. In a red morocco slipcase. A wonderful contemporary American edition of Thomas Paine's famous COMMON SENSE, one of the dozen such editions produced in America in 1776 after the initial Philadelphia editions issued by Bell and Bradford. All American editions from 1776 are quite rare, and many provincial editions such as this are possibly rarer than the first ones. COMMON SENSE was first issued by Philadelphia printer Bell on January 9, 1776. By Feb. 14, Bell had issued a third edition, but Paine had deserted his original publisher for W. and T. Bradford, who had gone along with his wishes in adding considerable material to the text, increasing it "upwards of one Third." It is this Bradford text, with several appendices and "An Address to the People Called Quakers," which was reprinted in the present Newburyport edition. It is impossible to fix the point of issue of the Newburyport edition, but it appears in two forms: one with the imprint of Samuel Phillips of Andover; and one with the imprint as here, for John Mycall, a resident of Newburyport and the actual printer. It was probably issued in the early spring, however, since Paine had invited other printers to republish it, and it was almost instantly famous. It is almost unnecessary to comment on the importance of COMMON SENSE. The political rhetoric of Paine inflamed the desire for independence, calling for it in clear language which swept the country like wildfire. The editors of the GROLIER AMERICAN HUNDRED remark: "It is not too much to say that the Declaration of Independence...was due more to Paine's COMMON SENSE than to any other single piece of writing." GROLIER AMERICAN 100, 14. GIMBEL CS-42. HOWES P17. EVANS 14961. AMERICAN INDEPENDENCE 222o. DAB XIII, pp.398-99.

      [Bookseller: William Reese Company - Americana]
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        THE CONSTITUTION OF THE COMMON-WEALTH OF PENNSYLVANIA, AS ESTABLISHED BY THE GENERAL CONVENTION ELECTED FOR THAT PURPOSE, AND HELD AT PHILADELPHIA, JULY 15th, 1776, AND CONTINUED BY ADJOURNMENTS TO SEPTEMBER 28, 1776

      Philadelphia: Printed by John Dunlap, 1776.. 32pp. Bound to style in antique half calf and marbled boards, spine gilt, leather label. A fine copy. The first independent state constitution issued in the wake of the Declaration of Independence, the Pennsylvania Constitution was a resounding victory for those who believed in direct popular rule. It was adopted by the end of September, 1776, and was printed by John Dunlap, printer of the first broadside printing of the Declaration of Independence. "Meeting a scant ten days after the adoption of the Declaration of Independence at independence Hall, the Convention, whose President was Benjamin Franklin, framed one of the most liberal of all early constitutions, providing for a unicameral legislative system with executive power vested in a President. The preamble inveighs against the King and his cruel, vengeful and unjust war against the Colonies, ‘employing therein not only the troops of Great Britain, but foreign mercenaries, savages, and slaves, for the avowed purpose of reducing them to a total and object submission to despotic domination, with many other acts of tyranny'" - Eberstadt. The Constitution provided for broad sufferage (any adult male who paid taxes), annual elections, terms limits, weekly publication of the proceedings of the legislature, and other measures to insure broadly popular representation. The first edition of the Pennsylvania Constitution is extremely rare. OCLC, which locates copies of the 1777, 1781, and 1784 editions, seems to offer only microform entries for the first edition. ESTC gives only eleven locations. Other than one other copy we have handled, the Eberstadts offered the only copy that we have been able to identify on the market in the last fifty years in their Constitution catalogue in 1964 ($600), with no copy recorded at auction during that period. Rare and important. SABIN 60014. EVANS 14979. EBERSTADT 166:127. ESTC W30512. HILDEBURN 3350. HARVARD TERCENTENNIAL EXHIBITION 49.

      [Bookseller: William Reese Company - Americana]
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        The American Military Pocket Atlas; Being An approved Collection of Correct Maps, Both General And Particular, Of The British Colonies; Especially those which now are, or probably may be The Theatre Of War:

      London, 1776. Hardcover. Very Good. 8vo - over 7¾ - 9¾" tall. Octavooriginal marbled paper over boards, quite worn; rebacked with red morocco label; 18th c.? bookplate of W. Miller inside front cover; 6 maps including Lake Champlain on heavy paper, minor fold wear, moderate foxing to 3 maps; overall very good condition.A well-preserved example, with maps on heavy paper, of an atlas carried by British officers during the American Revolution. As Schwartz observes, "the maps that the British high command regarded as providing essential topographical information in the most convenient form were collated in The American Military Atlas." Known as "The Holster Atlas," this unique compendium of maps "forms A Portable Atlas of North America, calculated in its Bulk and Price to suit the Pockets of Officers of all Ranks." ("Advertisement" in the atlas).The atlas's three major regional maps of the Northern, Middle and Southern colonies are the first three maps pictured in Nebenzahl's Atlas of the American Revolution. They all reflect an attempt to update the best available English maps of these areas. Perhaps the most important of the three, and the one least frequently seen on the market as a separate, is Bernard Romans' map of the Southeast. It did not appear in any other atlases in this first edition, as the other two maps did. It provided the first generally accurate map of East and West Florida, incorporating the works of De Brahm, Mouzon, Collet, as well as Romans' own 1774 landmark maps of Florida and the Gulf Coast, which are known in just a few copies.Another very important map in the atlas is the first state of the Brasier of Lake Champlain (with an inset of Lake George), site of the War's first naval engagement. This finely engraved work is also the first separate, printed map of Lake Champlain.Schwartz/ Ehrenberg, Mapping of America, p. 190; Nebenzahl, K. Atlas of the American Revolution, pp. 11-17; Phillips Atlases 1206, 1343.

      [Bookseller: Martayan Lan, Inc.]
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        An Excursion to the Lakes in Westmoreland and Cumberland; With a Tour Through Part of the Northern Counties in the Years 1773 and 1774

      London: J. Wilkie and W. Charnley, 1776. [2], 382pp, [4]. Contemporary full calf, raised bands, spine in six panels, morocco title label to second panel, bands bordered by gilt double rule, gilt roll to edges. Chipped to head of spine, outer joints slightly split, but holding well, small amount of loss towards head of front cover, edges rubbed. Internally very lightly browned, but generally quite bright and clean. Signature E misbound but complete. 19 plates (18 folding) as called for. Bicknell notes that it "incorporates 'An Excursion of 1773' (Bicknell 6), with little alteration ... to it is added an excursion to other parts of Cumberland, Hexham and parts of Durham and Yorkshire." There were no plates in the earlier edition, Bicknell 7, Upcott pg 120. First Edition. Full Calf. Good. 8vo.

      [Bookseller: Temple Rare Books]
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        A Topographical Description of such parts of North America as are contained in the (annexed) map of the Middle British Colonies, &c. in North America

      London: J. Almon, 1776. Folio. (17 3/4 x 10 5/8 inches). Engraved folding map. Expertly bound to style in half 18th century russia over contemporary marbled paper covered boards, flat spine divided into seven compartments with gilt double filets, red morocco lettering piece in the second compartment. One of the most important works issued at the time of the American Revolution, here complete with the rare map partially-printed from the same plate as the famed 1755 Lewis Evans's map printed by Benjamin Franklin. In 1753, Thomas Pownall came to America as the private secretary to Sir Danvers Osborn, the newly appointed colonial governor of New York. Shortly after arriving, however, Osborn died, leaving Pownall without a post. Curious about the colonies, however, Pownall remained in America, travelling widely in the region. Evidently of great enthusiasm and intelligence, Pownall met many of the most influential men in America at that time, including Benjamin Franklin. From this relationship, he was able to attend the 1754 Albany Conference and became involved in Indian affairs in the colony. Through that work and his relationship with Franklin, Pownall met surveyor Lewis Evans and in 1755, Evans published his famed Map of the Middle British Colonies, printed by Franklin and dedicated to Pownall. The map, the most accurate of the region at the time, was enormously influential, with multiple piracies being issued in London, and famously used by General Braddock during the French and Indian War. "A great change came over the fortunes of Evans' map in 1776. In that year Thomas Pownall, who had spent much time in America as Governor of Massachusetts Bay and South Carolina, and Lieut. Governor of New Jersey, published a folio volume entitled, A Topographical Description of such parts of North America ... Pownall, after his return from America continued to take the greatest interest in the welfare of the Colonies ... The increasing public interest taken in the affairs of the Colonies at the outbreak of the Revolution, doubtless prompted the publication of the Topographical Description. That work may be described as a new and much enlarged edition of both Evans' Map and his 'Analysis' [the text accompanying the Evans's map] of 1755. As to the map, Pownall appears to have been in possession of the original Evans plate engraved by Jas. Turner in Philadelphia, and he uses it as the basis of his improved map..." (Stevens). Indeed, much of the cartography of the western parts of Evans's original map remained unchanged in the 1776 Pownall edition, save for the significant addition of the routes of Christopher Gist and Harry Gordon. This addition is augmented by the publication in the appendix of Gist's journal of his 1750-51 journey through a portion of present day Ohio, Kentucky and on through North Carolina - the first publication of that important inland exploration. The most significant addition to Evans original map is east of Philadelphia, where Pownall has extended the plate to encompass all of New England, with the coast as far north as Nova Scotia. The cartography of this portion is derived from a number of sources, but includes Pownall's own explorations into the interior of Vermont and Maine, as well as the surveys conducted on behalf of Massachusetts Colonial Governor Sir Francis Bernard. Pownall's Topographical Description and its important map gives the best picture of the interior of North America as it was understood in the year of American independence. Howes P543("b"); Streeter Sale 826; Buck 28a; Bell P470; Sabin 64835; Vail 651; Graff 3341; Stevens, Lewis Evans His Map, VI; cf. Klinefelter, Lewis Evans and His Maps (Philadelphia, 1971).

      [Bookseller: Donald Heald Rare Books]
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        A PLAN OF THE ATTACK OF FORT SULIVAN [sic], NEAR CHARLES TOWN IN SOUTH CAROLINA. BY A SQUADRON OF HIS MAJESTY'S SHIPS, ON THE 28th JUNE 1776. WITH THE DISPOSITION OF THE KING'S LAND FORCES, AND THE ENCAMPMENTS AND ENTRENCHMENTS OF THE REBELS FROM THE DRAWINGS MADE ON THE SPOT

      London: "Printed and sold by William Faden, Successor to the late Mr. Thomas Jefferies, Geographer to the King...," Aug. 10, 1776.. Copper-engraved map, engraved one-line dedication to Sir Peter Parker and letterpress text in two columns beneath the map. Inset plan of the fort. Sheet size: 20 7/8 x 16 1/2 inches. Very good. An extremely rare first issue of a separately published Revolutionary War broadside battle plan depicting a critical altercation near Charleston, South Carolina. This highly important and finely engraved and letterpress broadside map captures the dramatic action surrounding the British naval assault on Fort Sullivan (called here "Sulivan"), the strategic key to Charleston. In the Spring of 1776, South Carolina had fallen into the firm possession of the Americans, a reality the British were determined to challenge. They dispatched a fleet of twenty ships (although only nine were armed) under Commodore Peter Parker, manned by marines, with the mission under the overall command of Major General Sir Henry Clinton. The ships moored in Five Fathom Hole, and landed on Long Island, which lay to the north of Sullivan's Island. Meanwhile, practical considerations indicated that the Patriot defenders were in considerable trouble. Led by Col. William Moultrie, the Americans were short of experienced troops and ammunition. Fort Sullivan, located on the southern tip of the island of the same name, had to be held, otherwise Charleston would surely fall. While the elegant plan of the fort, located in the inset at the upper left of the map, makes it appear to be a well designed bastion, it was in reality cobbled together with palmetto logs. Moultrie had a total of 1,125 men against 2,900 British marines. More worryingly, the fort had only twenty-six guns, with only twenty-eight rounds of ammunition per gun against the British fleet's 270 well stocked cannon. Fortunately for the Americans, the British proceeded to make a series of strategic errors. Clinton, who relied on information given by harbor pilots who were press-ganged into service, spent days looking for a non- existent ford between Long and Sullivan's Island, which in reality was prevented by the presence of a seven-foot deep channel. This bought the Americans time, which allowed American Col. William Thomson to fortify the northern tip of the island, as indicated on the map. On June 28th, the British mounted their full on naval assault of the fort, as indicated on the map by the ships shown grouped together just off of the fort, with each ship being named and detailed with its number of guns. Moultrie wisely rationed and synchronized the use of his limited firepower, such that the British met heavier than expected resistance. Unfamiliar with the tidal shoals that lay near the fort, the British ships were unable to sail in close enough to the fort to deliver lethal blows, while remaining in range of the American guns. Amazingly, many of the British rounds which did strike the fort were harmlessly absorbed into the structure's spongy palmetto logs. The British flagship H.M.S. Bristol took heavy losses, and another ship ran aground and had to be abandoned. Another British attempt to storm Thomson's northern positions with a raid by long boats was easily repelled. The British were forced to completely withdraw, and promptly set sail for New York. This copy is the very rare first state (of four known issues) of the map, which was the first Revolutionary battle plan to be drafted by William Faden. The text in two columns is found only on this issue and gives an account of the action taken from a letter by Parker to Lieut. Gen. Clinton. This issue was separately published as a broadside giving news of the battle to a British audience eager for information about the war; later issues, without text, appeared in Faden's NORTH AMERICAN ATLAS. NEBENZAHL, ATLAS OF THE AMERICAN REVOLUTION, map 8, p.60. NEBENZAHL, PRINTED BATTLE PLANS OF THE AMERICAN REVOLUTION 64. Stevens & Tree, "Comparative Cartography" 14(a), in Tooley, THE MAPPING OF AMERICA.

      [Bookseller: William Reese Company - Americana]
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