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Displayed below are some selected recent viaLibri matches for books published in 1691

        THE REVOLUTION IN NEW-ENGLAND JUSTIFIED, AND THE PEOPLE THERE VINDICATED FROM THE ASPERSIONS CAST UPON THEM BY MR. JOHN PALMER, IN HIS PRETENDED ANSWER TO THE DECLARATION PUBLISHED BY THE INHABITANTS OF BOSTON, AND THE COUNTRY ADJACENT, ON THE DAY WHEN THEY SECURED THEIR LATE OPPRESSORS, WHO ACTED BY AN ILLEGAL AND ARBITRARY COMMISSION FROM THE LATE KING JAMES. TO WHICH IS ADDED, A NARRATIVE OF PROCEEDINGS OF SIR EDMOND ANDROSSE AND HIS ACCOMPLICES, WHO ALSO ACTED BY AN ILLEGAL AND ARBITRARY COMMISSION FROM THE LATE KING JAMES, DURING HIS GOVERNMENT IN NEW ENGLAND

      Printed in the Year 1691. Boston: Re-printed and sold by Isaiah Thomas, 1773.. 59pp. Antique-style three-quarter speckled calf and marbled boards, spine gilt extra, leather label. Very good. The second printing, following the extremely rare 1691 Boston edition, which is rated a "d" in Howes. The present edition is itself rated a "b" in terms of rarity by Howes. The great patriot printer, Isaiah Thomas, was no doubt asking his fellow New Englanders to draw inevitable comparisons between the oppressive administration of 17th-century Massachusetts governor, Edmund Andros and their own day. Andros outraged the Puritans of Massachusetts by enforcing unpopular British laws, restricting town meetings, promoting the Church of England, and other seemingly intolerable acts. Thomas published this edition in the wake of the Boston Tea Party, and the significance and timeliness of this pamphlet would be self-evident to any American of patriotic leanings. Authorship has been ascribed to Increase Mather, but the "To the Reader" is signed with the initials "E.R." and "S.S." Edward Rawson was the longtime Massachusetts colonial secretary, and Samuel Sewall was a prominent Boston merchant, jurist, publisher, and diarist. HOWES R79, "b." SABIN 46732. EVANS 12973. ESTC W21974 .

      [Bookseller: William Reese Company - Americana]
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        The State of the Protestants in Ireland Under the late King James' Government; in which Their Carriage towards him is justified, and the absolute Necessity of their endeavouring to be freed from his

      London: Printed for Robert Clavell, , 1691. *The price of this item HAS BEEN temporarily reduced until Sunday, October 4. Order now for BEST SAVINGS! (sale item) ...Government and of submitting to their present Majesties is demonstrated; first edition; quarto (21 cm. tall), [14 leaves] (permission, title, contents), 408 (actually 426, there are printer's numbering errors in Bb, Bbb, Fff, and Ggg1), [1] (advertisements); first few leaves tattered with no loss, bottom margin of title repaired with tape from verso and a short tear at fore edge of following page also repaired but again no loss, age toning and age staining with occasional burn dots, paper not fragile and an entirely readable copy in simple modern cloth; Wing K538. Photos available upon request.

      [Bookseller: Zubal Books]
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        The State of the Protestants in Ireland Under the late King James' Government; in which Their Carriage towards him is justified, and the absolute Necessity of their endeavouring to be freed from his.

      London: Printed for Robert Clavell, 1691 - *The price of this item has been reduced until Sunday as part of our October ABEBOOKS sale* .Government and of submitting to their present Majesties is demonstrated; first edition; quarto (21 cm. tall), [14 leaves] (permission, title, contents), 408 (actually 426, there are printer's numbering errors in Bb, Bbb, Fff, and Ggg1), [1] (advertisements); first few leaves tattered with no loss, bottom margin of title repaired with tape from verso and a short tear at fore edge of following page also repaired but again no loss, age toning and age staining with occasional burn dots, paper not fragile and an entirely readable copy in simple modern cloth; Wing K538. Photos available upon request.

      [Bookseller: Zubal Books]
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        Histoire Ecclesiastique

      1691 - Fleury, Claude (and Jean Claude Fabre). HISTOIRE ECCLESIASTIQUE, par Mr. Fleury, Pretre, Abbe de Loc-Dieu, sous-precepteur de Monseigneur le Duc de Bourgogne & de Monseigneur le Duc d'Anjou. Paris: Pierre Emery (etc.), 1691(-1738). Quarto. 36 volumes. First edition. A beautiful set in full mottled calf, gilt, with lettering-pieces and five raised bands to spines. Probably bound at publication of the final volume. Title woodcut, and copper-engraved headpiece with history scene to each volume, mostly by Sebastien LeClerc. Volumes 21-36, by Fabre, are subtitled "Pour servir decontinuation a celle de Monsieur l'Abbe Fleury." Beginning with Volume 20 the imprints vary to include Jean Mariette, Saugrain, Pierre Martin, and Hippolyte-Louis Guerin. A thorough theological, historical, and anecdotal chronicle of the Catholic Church from the time of the Evangelists to 1595. A standard work, first published in 1691 and reprinted many times. Small losses to three spine ends, wear to extremities, and small superficial cracks to hinges of six volumes; occasional light waterstaining, but on the whole a very good copy. The OCLC shows only one other copy of the first edition, at Yale.

      [Bookseller: Boston Book Company, inc.o ABAA]
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        Terre Artiche

      Venice 1691 - Rare first state of this map., Size : 455x605 (mm), 17.875x23.75 (Inches), Black & White

      [Bookseller: Alexandre Antique Prints, Maps & Books]
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        Echo Trinaria, Ad Trinam Vocem clamantis in deserto Resonans, Sive Conciones Morales & Sacrae In Dominicas & Festa per annum. Opus Novum Ac Recens. Echo Prima (I/1+2) - Echo Secunda (II/1+2) - Echo Teria (III/2). - Ohne den Band III/1.,

      Köln, Noethen, 1691 - 1696. - Echo Prima: [8] Bl., 552 S., [20] Bl. + [2] Bl., 421 S., [15] Bl. - Echo Secunda: [4] Bl., 654 [richtig: 658] S., [25] Bl. + [2] Bl., 499 S., [15] Bl. - Echo Tertia (Teil II In Festa): [2] Bl., 392 S., [10] Bl. Mit 2 wiederholten gestochenen Frontispizes (in Band I/1 und II/1). *VD17 1:080743V. Jeder Band erschien in 2 Teilen je für "Dominicas" resp. "Festa". VD17 nennt zwar den Teil III/1, hat diesen aber nicht (wie die anderen) sep. aufgeführt. VD17 datiert den Band II/1 auf 1694, in unserem Exemplar steht dort das Jahr 1693. - Sehr seltene umfangreiche Predigtsammlung (es erschienen 6 Teile in 3 Bänden). Im vorliegenden Exemplar fehlt der Teil 1 des "Echo Tertia". - Die Pergamentbände leicht gebräunt und die beiden Fronttitel mit altem Stempel. Text mit leichter Altersbräunung. Insgesamt gut erhalten Sprache: la Gewicht in Gramm: 3000 20 c 16 cm. Pergamentbände der Zeit (I+II) und Lederband der Zeit mit Rückenprägung (III/2).

      [Bookseller: Antiquariat Braun]
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        Les caracteres de Theophraste traduits du grec : avec les caracteres ou les moeurs de ce siecle.

      Chez Etienne Michallet 1691 - - Chez Etienne Michallet, A Paris 1691, Fort in 12 (9x16,5cm), (32) 587pp. (4), Un Vol. relié. - Sixième édition en partie originale. Elle contient 54 nouvelles remarques par rapport aux précédentes éditions. Pleine Basane brune d'époque. Dos à nerfs orné. Pièce de titre en maroquin rouge. Frottements. La dernière page de garde a été contrecollée sur le privilège. 3 trous de ver sur le dos. Les Caractères de La bruyère furent une oeuvre dynamique, sans cesse en mouvement. Alors que la première édition met plutôt en valeur la traduction des Caractères de Théophraste, les éditions à partir de la quatrième de 1689 comporteront de très nombreux ajouts , ainsi la quatrième (première édition à avoir été complétée) possède 764 remarques contre 420 dans la première , la sixième que nous proposons en comptera 997 par rapport aux 420 originaux. La sixième édition ( 1691) accorde pour la première fois une place privilégiée aux Caractères, en faisant imprimer sa traduction de Théophraste en caractères plus petits et en signant explicitement son oeuvre : dans la remarque 14 du chapitre De quelques usages, il remplace " Geoffroy D*** par " Geoffroy de la Bruyère", prétendu ancêtre de haute naissance de l'auteur. (32) 587pp. (4) [Attributes: First Edition; Hard Cover]

      [Bookseller: Librairie Le Feu Follet]
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        Amerique Meridionale divisee en ses principales Parties ou sont distinguees les vns des autres les Estats suicant quils appartiennent presentement aux Francois, Castillans, Portugais, Hollandois, &c

      Paris 1691 - Size : 590x885 (mm), 23.25x34.875 (Inches), Hand Colored in Outline

      [Bookseller: Alexandre Antique Prints, Maps & Books]
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        HISTORIA DE LA CONQUISTA DE MÉJICO, POBLACION Y PROGRESSOS DE LA AMÉRICA SEPTENTRIONAL, CONOCIDA POR EL NOMBRE DE NUEVA ESPAÑA

      Barcelona: Joseph Llopis, 1691. [20] 548 [15] pages. Printed in double columns. With a woodcut title border and printers mark, engraved heraldic vignette, and large woodcut tailpieces. Quarto, 12 x 8 inches. Modern half-calf; a fine, bright copy, including the half-title; small ink spot on first three leaves.& Second edition, originally published in Madrid in1684. Antonio de Solis y Rivadeneyra (1610-1686) was born in Alcala de Henares and graduated in Law at Salamanca. He was a noted Spanish dramatist, secretary to the court of Oropesa and later secretary of state and private secretary to Philip IV. In 1667 he was appointed chief chronicler of the Indies. Solis' HISTORIA DE LA CONQUISTA DE MÉJICO was undoubtedly the most popular history of America that had then been written. His principal sources of inspiration for this history were the letters of Herman Cortes, the works of Francisco Lopez de Gomara, Bernal Diaz del Castillo, and some miscellaneous documents. In addition to a full account of the relations between Cortes and Montezuma, there is an abundance of data concerning the intimate lives of the Indians - their religious creed and rites, idols, hymns; their industries, arts, crafts, games, and methods of education. "The HISTORIA... covering the three years between the appointment of Cortes to command the invading force and the fall of the city, deservedly ranks as a Spanish prose classic." - ENCYCLOPEDIA BRITANNICA. 11th edition. SABIN 86447.

      [Bookseller: Margolis & Moss ABAA/ILAB]
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        Observationum Anatomico-Chirurgicarum Centuria Accedit Catalogus Rariorum, quae in Museo Ruyschiano asservantur.

      H. en Weduwe T. Boom, Amsterdam 1691 - Observationum Anatomico-Chirurgicarum Centuria Accedit Catalogus Rariorum, quae in Museo Ruyschiano asservantur., two parts in one. Amsterdam: H. en Weduwe T. Boom, 1691, 4to. (233 x 183 mm), [16], 138, [2] pp.; [4], 3-120 pp., first title-page printed in red and black, woodcut device on both titles, 46 engr. plates (including two folding) and some woodcuts in text, ink library stamps to titles and plates, occasional fraying to edges of some plates, contemp. vellum, spine lettered in manuscript. ---- DSB XIII, pp. 40-41; Wellcome IV, p. 597; Osler 3868; Waller 8337; Krivatsy 10071; Hirsch-H. IV, 934. - First edition. The first part containing 100 anatomicial and surgical observations by Ruysch, and the second part containing the first descriptive account of his famous anatomical museum. Displayed in several rented houses in Amsterdam, the museum was a major attraction for foreign visitors. In 1717, Ruysch sold his collection to Peter the Great for 30,000 guilders. In this text of practical observations in medicine and surgery, Ruysch presents the results of one hundred studies and illustrates many of them with excellent engravings, many of which are undoubtedly enhanced by his injection techniques (H.o.H. 613). [Attributes: First Edition; Hard Cover]

      [Bookseller: Milestones of Science Books]
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        Canoe degli Habitanti della Virginia escauate in un tronco d'Albere colle quali uanno all Pesca

      Venice 1691 - Vincenzo Coronelli (1650 – 1718) a copperplate engraving in superb condition from 'Isolario dell'Atlante Veneto' published in Venice from 1691-1698, measuring 13½”x19¾”. Two scenes of Native inhabitants. The top scene is of the native inhabitants of Virginia fishing in a dug out canoe. The bottom scene depicts native inhabitants of Greenland in a skin covered canoe fishing with a spear. Coronelli’s 'Isolario', believed to be Coronelli’s greatest work, is one of the most decorative and ornate of all 17th century atlases. Illustrated in Coronelli’s unique style, this atlas is a comprehensive survey of the islands of the world as known in his time, along with diagrams of various nautical weather conditions, instruments, fortresses and ship diagrams. By the end of the 17th century, he was perhaps the most famous map publisher in Europe and received constant requests from his contemporaries for information that would enable them to bring their atlases up to date.

      [Bookseller: Arader Galleries San Francisco]
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        "A collection of English words not generally used, with their significations and original, in two alphabetical catalogues, the one of such as are proper to the northern, the other to the southern counties. With an account of the preparing and refining such metals and minerals as are gotten in England...Augmented with many hundred of words, observations, letters, &c"

      London: printed for Christopher Wilkinson. 1691. "Second edition of the first book in English on English dialects, 12mo, pp. [22], 211, [5] ads; full calf antique; a bit of spotting to the title page, else very good and sound. & & While on his botanical journeys throughout England (for which he is now famous), Ray (1627-1705) had the opportunity to study local antiquities and customs, as well as dialects. This work, first published in 1674, is an outgrowth of his travels, as was his Collection of English Proverbs, which was first published in 1670. On one of his treks into Cornwall, he made notes on the smelting industry, and recorded his observations, which are included in this volume, on the smelting and refining of silver, tin, and iron. & & Not included in the first edition, and integrated here, is a ""large catalogue of northern words [with] their significations and etymologies,"" which had been sent to Ray by his friend M. Francis Brokesby, sometimes fellow of Trinity College, Cambridge. At the back of the volume is a short account of the defects of the English alphabet, a brief section on husbandry, and Edward Lhuyd's ""A collection of local words parallel'd with British or Welsh."" Wing R-381; Keynes 24; Kennedy 10624; Alston IX, 2."

      [Bookseller: Rulon-Miller Books]
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        Jacob Behmen's Theosophick Philosophy Unfolded; In Divers

      1691. Early English Anthology of Boehm's Writings Taylor, Edward [c.1642-1729]. [Boehme, Jacob (1575-1624)]. Jacob Behmen's Theosophick Philosophy Unfolded; In Divers Considerations and Demonstrations, Shewing the Verity and Utility of the Several Doctrines or Propositions Contained in the Writings of that Divinely Instructed Author. Also, the Principal Treatises of the Said Author Abridged. And Answers Given to the Remainder of the 177 Theosophick Questions, Propounded by the Said Jacob Behmen, Which were Left Unanswered by Him at the Time of His Death. As a Help Towards the Better Understanding the Old and New Testament. Also What Man is With Respect to Time and Eternity. Being an Open Gate to the Greatest Mysteries. With a Short Account of the Life of Jacob Behmen. London: Printed for Tho. Salusbury, 1691. [vi], 434, [8] pp. Second and third signatures bound in reverse order. Portrait frontispiece lacking. Quarto (8" x 6"). Contemporary paneled sheep, raised bands to spine. Moderate rubbing to extremities, a few small scuffs to boards, chipping to spine ends, front board partially detached but secure, rear joint just starting at ends, corners lightly bumped. Armorial bookplate of the Earl of Macclesfield to front pastedown. Offsetting to margins, light foxing in a few places. A sound copy of a scarce treatise. * Only edition. This edition of Boehm's writings in translation marks an important chapter in the English reception of Boehm's writings. A German mystic and self-taught theologian, he believed that humanity had fallen from a state of divine grace to its present state of sin and suffering, that the forces of evil included fallen angels who had rebelled against God. On these points he is consistent with Lutheran Theology. Boehme believed, however, that the fall from grace was a necessary stage in the evolution of the universe. It was necessary for humanity to depart from God in order initiate an evolution toward a new state of redeemed harmony that would be more perfect than the original state of innocence. God would thus achieve a new self-awareness by interacting with a creation that was both part of, and distinct from, Himself. Wing, Short-Title Catalogue of Books Printed in England, Scotland, Ireland, Wales and British America B3421=T270.

      [Bookseller: The Lawbook Exchange, Ltd.]
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        EL OLIMPO DEL SABIO INSTRUIDO DE LA NATURALEZA, Y SEGUNDA PARTE DE LAS MÁXIMAS POLITICAS Y MORALES, ILUSTRADAS CON TODO GENERO DE ERUDICIÓN SACRA Y HUMANA.

      IMPRENTA ANTONIO FERRER Y BALTHASAR FERRER, BARCELONA 1691 - 486 pp+14 pp (Indice), 19,5x16, encuadernación en pergamino de época, el lomo algo fatigado con una rotura en la parte superior, bien conservado el interior. 486 p. [Attributes: Hard Cover]

      [Bookseller: EL ACCIPIES]
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        An account of several New Inventions and Improvements Now necessary for England, In a Discourse by way of Letter to the Dukeof Marlborough, Relating to Building of our English Shipping, Planting of Oaken Timber in the Forrests,..

      Small octavo, 2 parts, contemporary panelled calf, blind ruled, rebacked, (2) + (6) + cxxxvpp + (1p) errata + (9) + 132pp, with the second title page at f4 dated 1691 within a double ruled border, 2 folding tables, both with short tears, engraved armorial bookplate of Sir John Anstruther of that Ilk on verso of title, bookplate of the Signet Library, a good copy. Wing H265. Keynes, no.39. Kress S747. Goldsmith 2873.First edition containing on pp.117-132 Sir William Petty?s Treatise of Naval Philosophy, his only published work on the subject. The Treatise is in three parts, "A Physico-Mathematical Discourse of Ships and Shipping. Of Naval Policy. Of Naval Oeconomy and Husbandry"."Petty?s passion for navigation and ship-building is, perhaps, the most characteristically English feature of his many-sided character. Petty and Wren were instructed by their fellow scientists to lecture on the philosophy of shipping, and soon afterwards Petty actually read a paper on the subject to the Society". Strauss, Petty. Portrait of a Genius.

      [Bookseller: Hamish Riley-Smith Rare Books]
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        MANOSCRITTO DI INTERESSE MANTOVANO recante il titolo: Istorico Ragionamento ossia narrazione sopra l'origine antichità e domini delli stabili e terreni che possiede la casa Custoza dimorante in Mantova.

      [metà XVIII sec.], S.l.n.d., - ms cartaceo in-folio (mm.380x255), cc 65, rileg. mod. m. tela, piatti in carta marmorizz. Il ms si compone di due parti. Nella prima parte sono riferiti dettagliatamente, con indicazioni di rogiti notarili, i passaggi di proprietà, per successione ereditaria o per compravendita, degli immobili Custoza posti in corso Pradella di Mantova (contrada Leone Vermiglio e altre) nelle vicinanze di via Corrado, come mostra lo schizzo riportato a c.5v sino a giungere all'acquisto della famiglia Custoza nel 1691 e poi, per passaggi di famiglia sino al 1732. Questa prima parte porta il titolo "Ragionamento storico sopra l'origine, antichità e dominii della casa ossia Palazzo di Città" (cc.2-29). La seconda parte reca il titolo "Ragionamento storico sopra l'origine [.] delle corti di Marengo e Marenghello con altre notizie" (cc.30-65). La seconda parte tratta infatti delle due proprietà marmirolesi di Marengo e corte Marenghello divenute anch'esse della nobile famiglia Custoza; si parte dall'origine antichissima di Marengo, già esistente nel 1037, per descrivere i passaggi di proprietà, la qualità degli edifici, gli appezzamenti di terra, i canoni d'affitto, e si giunge sino alla data del 1738 con cui termina la narrazione del ms. Allegato al ms, su fogli volanti, altro ms di 5 carte non numerate dal titolo "Trapassi dei fondi di Marengo e Marenghello" con notizie che vanno dal 1037 al 1781. Allegato un dattiloscritto di 5 cc numerate recante il titolo "Memorie inedite sulla gran corte di Marengo". Il ms principale si ritiene dunque della prima metà del Settecento in quanto l'ultima data cronologica citata è il 1738, con una nota marginale di mano differente del 1818 (c.11v). Altre note a matita di mano moderna aggiunte. Dalla c.52r cambia la mano dello scrivente. Restauro alla prima carta, ottimo stato di conservazione. [307]

      [Bookseller: SCRIPTORIUM Studio Bibliografico]
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        Opera Medico-Practica: I. Casus & observationes practicae triginta sex annorum. II. Descriptiones medicamentorum singularium. III. Epistolae & consilia. IV. Consilium de peste. V. Responsa. VI. Consilium diaeticon

      Leipzig: Johannis Herebordi Klosii [Johann Herbert Kloss], 1691. Hardcover (Full Leather). Very Good Condition. Contemporary full calf, spine label chipped and nearly gone, worn at corners with some loss at spine ends and light cracking to hinge, but still a fairly well preserved binding. Originally published in 1677. The Responsa Medica, originally published separately in 1668 in bound at the end with its own title page in red and black but consecutive pagination. 1157pp. Van de Sande bookplate on endpaper.& & During the 30 years war, he was physician to the Elector of Brandenburg and in 1638 cured a large portion of the Swedish army of the plague for which he was much lauded (at least by the Swedes). Size: Octavo (8vo). Text is clean and unmarked. Moderately foxed throughout. Previous owner's inscription in ink, neat. Quantity Available: 1. Shipped Weight: Under 1 kilo. Category: Medicine & Health; Inventory No: 039124.

      [Bookseller: Pazzo Books]
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        MEMORIE ISTORICHE della città di Cluana detta oggi volgarmente di S. Elpidio nella provincia della Marca, colla vita dei Santi Elpidio, e Sisinnio suo discepolo, e con altre antiche, e moderne notitie, messe insieme, e scritte da Natale Medaglia della medesima terra. Coll'aggiunta delle Memorie dell'istessa città, lasciate dal famoso Andrea Bacci, e dall'erudito Camillo Medaglia Elpidiani.

      Pannelli,, Macerata, 1691 - 2 opere in un vol. in-4, pp. (8), 180; (4), leg. ottocentesca m. tela con carta dec. ai piatti e tit. mss al d. Con una bella tav. in rame ripiegata al front. raffigurante la veduta prospettca di S. Elpidio. Rara ediz. orig. della storia di S. Elpidio, in provincia di Ascoli Piceno, sorta sull'antica città romana di Cluana. Ranghiasci p. 253. Lozzi cita una seconda ediz. del 1716: "Raro". [MM2-175]

      [Bookseller: SCRIPTORIUM Studio Bibliografico]
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        Dictionnaire Mathématique Ou Idée Générale Des Mathématiques. Dans Lequel Sont Contenus Les Termes De Cette Science, Outre Plusieurs Termes Des Arts & Des Autres Sciences.

      Huguetan, Amsterdam 1691 - Frontis grabado - portada grabada y a dos tintas - 6h. - 739pp. y 23 láminas, tres de ellas plegadas. También muy ilustrado entretexto con grabados y ejemplos matemáticos y musicales. =Ejemplar algo cansado. ==-Amsterdam, Huguetan, 1691. In-4. Frontis gravé - titre gravé - 6ff. - 739pp. et 23 planches, 3 dépliantes. Aussi très illustré entre le texte avec gravures et des exemples mathématiques et musicaux. Basane de l'époque. =Exemplaire un peu fatigué. =Première édition. Size: 4º [Attributes: First Edition; Hard Cover]

      [Bookseller: BALAGUÉ LLIBRERÍA ANTIQUARIA]
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        Nauglio del Giappone della Fayfena. (ship engraving)

      Venice: 1691-98 - Vincenzo Coronelli (1650 - 1718) Isolario dell'Atlante Veneto Venice: 1691-98 Copperplate engravings Sheet size: 16” x 11 1/2” 25” x 19 1/2” framed Coronelli was both a cleric and an encyclopedist, with a particular interest in geography and cartography. He joined the Franciscan Order in Venice in 1665 and six years later entered the convent of Santa Maria Gloriosa dei Frari, which was to become his professional workshop. In 1681 Coronelli served as Royal Cartographer to King Louis XIV in Paris, gaining special access to the most current records on world geography sent in from the colonies, and provided by the French Academy of Sciences.Coronelli returned to Venice in 1684 and founded the Accademia Cosmografica degli Argonauti, a geographical society with membership drawn from the aristocracy and church hierarchy, and a year later he was appointed Cosmographer to the Republic of Venice. He also started a successful publishing career, and was sole author or contributor to over 140 titles and produced several hundred maps, either printed separately or as parts of atlases. Coronelli published his groundbreaking cartographic work in a number of notable publications, including the two-part Isolario Atlante Veneto (1691-1692; 1696-98), and the Corso Geografico Universale (1692 & 1695). He is also credited with being the first to publish an encyclopedia in alphabetic order. By the end of the 17th century, he was perhaps the most famous map publisher in Europe and received constant requests from his contemporaries for information that would enable them to bring their atlases up to date. Shortly after his death, however, his name and work were quickly forgotten, and he remained in obscurity for several centuries. The lasting influence of his work is undeniable, however, and modern appreciation has more than compensated for the earlier lack of recognition. Coronelli’s Isolario, believed to be Coronelli’s greatest work, is one of the most decorative and ornate of all 17th century atlases. Illustrated in Coronelli’s unique style, this atlas is a comprehensive survey of the islands of the world as known in his time, along with diagrams of various nautical weather conditions, instruments, fortresses and ship diagrams.

      [Bookseller: Arader Galleries San Francisco]
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        Quinti Horatii Flacci Opera. Interpretatione et notis illustravit Ludovicus DesprezÉIn usum Serenissimi Delphini.

      Pris: Fridericus Leonard 1691. - Pretyman (1750) was a close adviser to William Pitt throughout his life, particularly on matters of finance. Pitt appointed him to the diocese of Lincoln in 1786, a see he held until 1820, when he moved to Winchester. He wrote a two-volume biography of Pitt in 1821. Two volumes, quarto. . [14], 504; [2], 505 (fly-title to Volume II), [1, blank], pp. 505-914, [126, indexes] pp. Contemporary Dutch vellum. Covers panelled in blind, with central blindstamped ornament, spines lettered in ink. Minor soiling, a few leaves lightly browned, but overall a very good set. With the armorial bookplates of George Pretyman (1750-1827), Bishop of Lincoln, and armorial bookplates of a later owner. First Delphine edition of Horace, edited by Louis Desprez. The Delphine editions of Latin authors, edited by Pierre Huet, were created for Louis, le Grand Dauphin, the heir of Louis XIV. Many, including this one, became the standard texts and were frequently reprinted This is a scarce set. The four copies listed in OCLC are all in libraries in the Netherlands.

      [Bookseller: Michael R. Thompson Books, A.B.A.A.]
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        Kalendarium Hortense: or, The Gardeners Almanac, Directing what he is to do Monthly throughout the Year. And What Fruits and Flowers are in Prime

      R Chiswell in St Paul's Churchyard, T Sawbridge in Little-Britain and R Bentley in Russell-Street in Covent Garden, London 1691 - A very good copy of the 8th edition of Evelyn's classic work which was the first calendar produced for english gardeners (first published in 1664). John Evelyn (1620-1706) was, among other talents, a noted horticulturalist. In what appears to be the original binding which has been repaired so that it has a newer spine. The spine has a red title label and gilt lettering and decoration around raised bands. There is some wear to the edges of the boards but the binding is otherwise in very good condition. Internally the free endpapers look to have been replaced at some point. There is a black and white engraved frontispiece and title page with red and black inks. There is an ink marking at the top of the title page which has blotted onto the top of the frontispiece. With dedication to Abraham Cowley Esq; a dedicated poem by Abraham Cowley called 'The Garden' to John Evelyn (which has 2 ink signatures of A Cowley at the end - it seems unlikely that these are original); introduction to the Kalendar; and the Kalendar arranged in months. Each month has 2 title sections with its name in red capitals with an astrological sign - the first section covers the Orchard and Olitory Garden; the second the Parterre and flower garden. There is a section on the new conservatory or green-house illustrated with an engraving; a section on the best fruit varieties; a detailed index and an errata page. There is another ink signature at the rear. The contents are in very good condition bar the occasional brown spot. 175 pp plus the index and errata page [Attributes: Hard Cover]

      [Bookseller: ecbooks]
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        Dictionnaire mathématique, ou Idée générale des mathématiques. Dans lequel l'on trouve, outre les termes de cette science, plusieurs termes des arts & des autres sciences; avec des raisonnemens qui conduisent peu à peu l'esprit à une connoissance universelle des mathématiques.

      A. Lambin for E. Michallet, Paris 1691 - Contemp. sheep (rubbed, joints repaired), [10]-672-[70] pp. (some minor spotting, blank lower corner of Gggg4 repaired). Good copy. Conlon Prélude, 5365. Houzeau/Lancaster 9334. BN Paris (3). Not in Goldsmith (BL London). Cp. Matagne (Namur) O-135 (Amsterdam repr.). Bibl. Dt. Mus., Libri rari 208; Roller-G. II, 269; Cantor III, 270; DSB X, 264. - 1st edition of one of the major works of the French mathematician Ozanam (1640-1717). Illustrated (complete) with 24 fold. plates and with numerous woodcuts and diagrams. The dictionary is divided into sections dealing with subjects such as arithmetic, algebra, geometry, cosmography, astronomy, navigation, optics, perspective, mechanics, hydrostatics. With long chapters on architecture (pp. 551-584), fortification (pp. 585-630) and music (pp. 640-672). [Attributes: First Edition; Hard Cover]

      [Bookseller: Milestones of Science Books]
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        Saga om k. Oloff Tryggwaszon i Norrege hwilken hafwer warit den berömligste och lofligste konungh i Norlanden/ och därsammestädes christendomen först och lyckeligst utwidgat. Sammanskrefwen på gammal swenska eller gothiska af Odde Munck som war i Omgeyrum wid Watns-dal norr i Islandh. Nu på nya swenskan/ sampt det latiniske språket öfwersatt af Jacob Jsthmen Reenhielm åhr effter Christi bördh 1691. Historia Olai Tryggwæ filii in Norrigia. Laudatissimi olim & maxime incluti in septentrione regis, qui omnium primus atque maximo cum successu christianam religionem ibidem propagasse fertur. Idiomate gothico s. suevico vetusto primum condita ab Oddo Monacho Islando nunc in linguam hodiernam sueticam, quin & latialem translata a Jacobo Jstmenio R

      1691 - Uppsala, (H. Keyser II), 1691. 4:o. (8),285,(29),1-4,7-116 pp. A woodcut illustration in the text on p. 76 in the second sequence. A fairly ragged contemporary half calf with raised bands. Wormholes on the spine. The corners defect and back board with a vertical crack. Front flyleaf missing. Some occasional wormholes and stains caused by ink, damp and soil. A major ruststain with a neglectable loss of a letter on pp. 131-32 and a few wormholes in text on pp. 181-95. A few leaves incorrectly bound in the beginning. Owner's signatures. Collijn Sveriges bibliografi 1600-talet 661. Fiske Catalogue of the Icelandic collection s. 434. Warmholtz Bibliotheca historica Sueo-Gothica 2605. Bibliotheca Rudbeckiana 741. The story of king Olaf Tryggvason of Norway translated to Swedish and Latin. [Attributes: Hard Cover]

      [Bookseller: Mats Rehnström Rare Books SVAF, ILAB]
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        Les provinces des Pay Bas Catholiques.....le Roiyde France, le Roy d' Espagne....

      Paris 1691. Karte zeigt gesamt Belgien und Luxemburg und teilweise Frankreich, Auf 2 Platten gedruckt und zusammen gesetzt, altkoloriert, Kupferstich, 54,5 x 87,5. Zustand: Perfekt, dem Alter entsprechend

      [Bookseller: Antique Sommer & Sapunaru KG]
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        De re libraria selecta Quaedam auspiccius diviniset superiorum iussu pro loco in amplissimo collegio philosophico more maiorum rite obtinendo praeses M. --- Slaiza - Variscus resprondente Ionne Matthia Wendio Lubecensi selenni eamini submittet a.d. XXI, D

      1691. Ienae, Litteris Georgi Heinrici Mulleri. (1691). 24pp. No wrappers (as issued), but decorated paper spine. Wrinkled throughout.

      [Bookseller: Knuf Rare Books]
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        An Account of Some Experiments of Light and Colours Formerly Made by Sir Isaac Newton, and Mention'd in His Opticks" pp. 433-447 (Newton and Desaguliers); "A Plain and Easy Experiment to Confirm Sir Isaac Newton's Doctrine of the Different Refrangibility of the Rays of Light" pp. 448-452; WITH "Logometria Auctore Rogero Cotes" pp. 5-45 (Cotes); WITH "The Art of Living under Water: Or, a Discourse concerning the Means of Furnishing Air at the Bottom of the Sea in Any Ordinary Depths" (pp. 492-499); "An Account of Several Extraordinary Meteors or Lights in the Sky" (pp. 159-164); "An Account of Several Nebulae or Lucid Spots Like Clouds, Lately Discovered among the Fixt Stars by Help of the Telescope" (pp. 390-392);"Methodus Singularis Qua S

      - FIRST EDITION OF DESAGULIERS AND NEWTON PAPERS ABOUT NEWTON'S THEORY OF LIGHT AND COLOURS. First edition of Edmund Halley's description of his diving bell. The Phil Trans is the oldest continuously published journal of an academy of science. As such, the Phil Trans established the important principles of scientific priority and peer review that have become the central foundations of scientific journals ever since. Works in every field of science are present; in addition to those of Hauksbee, there are papers by Cotes, Newton, Desaguliers, and Taylor. Though Halley lodged a patent for his diving bell in 1691, this 1716 Phil Trans paper was his first public description of his improved device. "Halley's paper, 'The Art of Living Underwater,' sets out the problems as he saw them of the bells constructed at the time. Bells were in use in shallow water throughout Europe, and there had been several notable cases of salvage. [but] Halley was keen to improve on the system, which involvwed hauling the diver and his bell all the way to the surface in order to replenish the air inside the container. He proposed a method whereby barrels of fresh air could be lowered to the bell, and emptied into it by means of a hose. Stale air would be let out from the top end of the bell through a stopcock. He tells us that air in an enclosed space loses its 'vivifying spirit,' and wisely states that he will not go into the precise physiological reasons for this, leaving that to the 'curious anatomist, to whom the structure of the lungs is better understood.' But Halley does understand that current models of diving bells contained only a small amount of air, and while it had been proposed to pump fresh air into them from the surface, the strength of the pumps available at the time was not sufficient to overcome the pressure at depths of more than fifteen feet or so. The deeper a bell descended, the smaller the air space that would be left in which to breathe, as the water pressure would compress the air inside the bell. Edmund Halley's bell was bigger and more stable than those of his contemporaries, and he further proposed that a diver might make excursions from the bell wearing a miniature bell on his head. What he suggested was a primitive diving helmet, which would be attached by a leather pipe to the large bell, although even at publication he does not reveal the precise details of this device. Unlike other scientific brains of the age, Halley tested his improved diving bell himself, descending into the waters of Pagham harbor in Sussex in the summer of 1691. According to his own account, Halley sat on a bench suspended across the lower reaches of the bell and remained dry except for his showes. Noting the effects of increased air pressure as the bell descends, he describes the physical sensations produced on the Eustachian tubes during the dive: 'The only inconvenience that attends [the descent] is found in the ears, within which there are cavities opening only outwards, and that by pores so small as not to give admission even to the air itself, unless they be dilated and distended by considerable force. Hence, a pressure begins to be felt on each ear, which by degrees grows painful, like as if a quill were forcibly thrust into the hole of the ear; till at length, the force overcoming the obstacle, that which constrains these pores yields to the pressure, and letting some condensed air slip in, present ease ensues'" (Ecott, Neutral Buoyancy, 19-20). ALSO INCLUDED are two other Halley papers, both on the astronomical phenomena of objects in the sky that produce light but do not contain a sun 'nebulae'. ALSO INCLUDED is Cotes' "Logometria Auctore Rogero Cotes," his only paper and the one in which he provides the first proof of the relation between exponential function to trigonometric functions -- the identity now known as Euler's formula. ALSO INCLUDED is Taylor's important deduction that "at the distance of nine feet, the power alters faster, than

      [Bookseller: Atticus Rare Books]
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        An Account of an Experiment made by Dr. Brook Taylor assisted by Mr. Hauksbee, in order to discover the Law of Magnetical Attraction" pp. 294-295 (Taylor) WITH "An Account of Some Experiments of Light and Colours Formerly Made by Sir Isaac Newton, and Mention'd in His Opticks" pp. 433-447 (Newton and Desaguliers); "A Plain and Easy Experiment to Confirm Sir Isaac Newton's Doctrine of the Different Refrangibility of the Rays of Light" pp. 448-452; WITH "Logometria Auctore Rogero Cotes" pp. 5-45 (Cotes); WITH "The Art of Living under Water: Or, a Discourse concerning the Means of Furnishing Air at the Bottom of the Sea in Any Ordinary Depths" (pp. 492-499); "An Account of Several Extraordinary Meteors or Lights in the Sky" (pp. 159-164); "An

      - FIRST EDITION OF BROOK TAYLOR'S important deduction that "at the distance of nine feet, the power alters faster, than as the cubes of the distances, whereas at the distances of one and two feet, the power alters nearly as their square." "Several important early disciples of Newton, particularly his assistants Francis Hauksbee and Brook Taylor. accordingly undertook to obtain by experiment a magnetic analog to the law of gravitation. Newton speaks of 'magnetic attraction,' which might imply the force of attraction between two magnets, but Taylor and Hauksbee measured the field of the magnet at different distances from the lodestone. Desaguliers' and Newton's papers about Newton's theory of light and colours. The Phil Trans is the oldest continuously published journal of an academy of science. As such, the Phil Trans established the important principles of scientific priority and peer review that have become the central foundations of scientific journals ever since. Works in every field of science are present; in addition to those of Hauksbee, there are papers by Cotes, Newton, Desaguliers, and Halley. WITH First edition of Edmund Halley's description of his diving bell. Though Halley lodged a patent for his diving bell in 1691, this 1716 Phil Trans paper was his first public description of his improved device. "Halley's paper, 'The Art of Living Underwater,' sets out the problems as he saw them of the bells constructed at the time. Bells were in use in shallow water throughout Europe, and there had been several notable cases of salvage. [but] Halley was keen to improve on the system, which involvwed hauling the diver and his bell all the way to the surface in order to replenish the air inside the container. He proposed a method whereby barrels of fresh air could be lowered to the bell, and emptied into it by means of a hose. Stale air would be let out from the top end of the bell through a stopcock. He tells us that air in an enclosed space loses its 'vivifying spirit,' and wisely states that he will not go into the precise physiological reasons for this, leaving that to the 'curious anatomist, to whom the structure of the lungs is better understood.' But Halley does understand that current models of diving bells contained only a small amount of air, and while it had been proposed to pump fresh air into them from the surface, the strength of the pumps available at the time was not sufficient to overcome the pressure at depths of more than fifteen feet or so. The deeper a bell descended, the smaller the air space that would be left in which to breathe, as the water pressure would compress the air inside the bell. Edmund Halley's bell was bigger and more stable than those of his contemporaries, and he further proposed that a diver might make excursions from the bell wearing a miniature bell on his head. What he suggested was a primitive diving helmet, which would be attached by a leather pipe to the large bell, although even at publication he does not reveal the precise details of this device. Unlike other scientific brains of the age, Halley tested his improved diving bell himself, descending into the waters of Pagham harbor in Sussex in the summer of 1691. According to his own account, Halley sat on a bench suspended across the lower reaches of the bell and remained dry except for his showes. Noting the effects of increased air pressure as the bell descends, he describes the physical sensations produced on the Eustachian tubes during the dive: 'The only inconvenience that attends [the descent] is found in the ears, within which there are cavities opening only outwards, and that by pores so small as not to give admission even to the air itself, unless they be dilated and distended by considerable force. Hence, a pressure begins to be felt on each ear, which by degrees grows painful, like as if a quill were forcibly thrust into the hole of the ear; till at length, the force overcoming the obstacle, that which constrains these por

      [Bookseller: Atticus Rare Books]
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        Logometria Auctore Rogero Cotes" pp. 5-45 (Cotes); WITH "The Art of Living under Water: Or, a Discourse concerning the Means of Furnishing Air at the Bottom of the Sea in Any Ordinary Depths" (pp. 492-499); "An Account of Several Extraordinary Meteors or Lights in the Sky" (pp. 159-164); "An Account of Several Nebulae or Lucid Spots Like Clouds, Lately Discovered among the Fixt Stars by Help of the Telescope" (pp. 390-392);"Methodus Singularis Qua Solis Parallaxis Sive Distantia a Terra" pp. 454-464; (Halley) WITH "An Account of Some Experiments of Light and Colours Formerly Made by Sir Isaac Newton, and Mention'd in His Opticks" pp. 433-447 (Newton and Desaguliers); "A Plain and Easy Experiment to Confirm Sir Isaac Newton's Doctrine of th

      - FIRST EDITION of Roger Cotes' "Logometria Auctore Rogero Cotes," his only paper and the one in which he provides the first proof of the relation between exponential function to trigonometric functions -- the identity now known as Euler's formula. The Phil Trans is the oldest continuously published journal of an academy of science. As such, the Phil Trans established the important principles of scientific priority and peer review that have become the central foundations of scientific journals ever since. Works in every field of science are present; in addition to those of Hauksbee, there are papers by Halley, Newton, Desaguliers, and Taylor. ALSO INCLUDED: First edition of Edmund Halley's description of his diving bell. Though Halley lodged a patent for his diving bell in 1691, this 1716 Phil Trans paper was his first public description of his improved device. "Halley's paper, 'The Art of Living Underwater,' sets out the problems as he saw them of the bells constructed at the time. Bells were in use in shallow water throughout Europe, and there had been several notable cases of salvage. [but] Halley was keen to improve on the system, which involvwed hauling the diver and his bell all the way to the surface in order to replenish the air inside the container. He proposed a method whereby barrels of fresh air could be lowered to the bell, and emptied into it by means of a hose. Stale air would be let out from the top end of the bell through a stopcock. He tells us that air in an enclosed space loses its 'vivifying spirit,' and wisely states that he will not go into the precise physiological reasons for this, leaving that to the 'curious anatomist, to whom the structure of the lungs is better understood.' But Halley does understand that current models of diving bells contained only a small amount of air, and while it had been proposed to pump fresh air into them from the surface, the strength of the pumps available at the time was not sufficient to overcome the pressure at depths of more than fifteen feet or so. The deeper a bell descended, the smaller the air space that would be left in which to breathe, as the water pressure would compress the air inside the bell. Edmund Halley's bell was bigger and more stable than those of his contemporaries, and he further proposed that a diver might make excursions from the bell wearing a miniature bell on his head. What he suggested was a primitive diving helmet, which would be attached by a leather pipe to the large bell, although even at publication he does not reveal the precise details of this device. Unlike other scientific brains of the age, Halley tested his improved diving bell himself, descending into the waters of Pagham harbor in Sussex in the summer of 1691. According to his own account, Halley sat on a bench suspended across the lower reaches of the bell and remained dry except for his showes. Noting the effects of increased air pressure as the bell descends, he describes the physical sensations produced on the Eustachian tubes during the dive: 'The only inconvenience that attends [the descent] is found in the ears, within which there are cavities opening only outwards, and that by pores so small as not to give admission even to the air itself, unless they be dilated and distended by considerable force. Hence, a pressure begins to be felt on each ear, which by degrees grows painful, like as if a quill were forcibly thrust into the hole of the ear; till at length, the force overcoming the obstacle, that which constrains these pores yields to the pressure, and letting some condensed air slip in, present ease ensues'" (Ecott, Neutral Buoyancy, 19-20). ALSO INCLUDED are two other Halley papers, both on the astronomical phenomena of objects in the sky that produce light but do not contain a sun 'nebulae'. ALSO INCLUDED are two papers in which Desaguliers and Newton write about Newton's theory of light and colours. Desaguliers' optical experiments here were for the most paper retetiti

      [Bookseller: Atticus Rare Books]
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        The Art of Living under Water: Or, a Discourse concerning the Means of Furnishing Air at the Bottom of the Sea in Any Ordinary Depths" pp. 492-499; "An Account of Several Nebulae or Lucid Spots Like Clouds, Lately Discovered among the Fixt Stars by Help of the Telescope" (pp. 390-392);"Methodus Singularis Qua Solis Parallaxis Sive Distantia a Terra" pp. 454-464; "An Account of Several Extraordinary Meteors or Lights in the Sky" (pp. 159-164); (Halley) WITH "Logometria Auctore Rogero Cotes" pp. 5-45 (Cotes); "An Account of Some Experiments of Light and Colours Formerly Made by Sir Isaac Newton, and Mention'd in His Opticks" pp. 433-447 (Newton and Desaguliers); "A Plain and Easy Experiment to Confirm Sir Isaac Newton's Doctrine of the Diffe

      - FIRST EDITION, FIRST ISSUE OF EDMUND HALLEY'S DESCRIPTION OF HIS DIVING BELL. The Phil Trans is the oldest continuously published journal of an academy of science. As such, the Phil Trans established the important principles of scientific priority and peer review that have become the central foundations of scientific journals ever since. Works in every field of science are present; in addition to those of Hauksbee, there are papers by Cotes, Newton, Desaguliers, and Taylor. Though Halley lodged a patent for his diving bell in 1691, this 1716 Phil Trans paper was his first public description of his improved device. "Halley's paper, 'The Art of Living Underwater,' sets out the problems as he saw them of the bells constructed at the time. Bells were in use in shallow water throughout Europe, and there had been several notable cases of salvage. [but] Halley was keen to improve on the system, which involvwed hauling the diver and his bell all the way to the surface in order to replenish the air inside the container. He proposed a method whereby barrels of fresh air could be lowered to the bell, and emptied into it by means of a hose. Stale air would be let out from the top end of the bell through a stopcock. He tells us that air in an enclosed space loses its 'vivifying spirit,' and wisely states that he will not go into the precise physiological reasons for this, leaving that to the 'curious anatomist, to whom the structure of the lungs is better understood.' But Halley does understand that current models of diving bells contained only a small amount of air, and while it had been proposed to pump fresh air into them from the surface, the strength of the pumps available at the time was not sufficient to overcome the pressure at depths of more than fifteen feet or so. The deeper a bell descended, the smaller the air space that would be left in which to breathe, as the water pressure would compress the air inside the bell. Edmund Halley's bell was bigger and more stable than those of his contemporaries, and he further proposed that a diver might make excursions from the bell wearing a miniature bell on his head. What he suggested was a primitive diving helmet, which would be attached by a leather pipe to the large bell, although even at publication he does not reveal the precise details of this device. Unlike other scientific brains of the age, Halley tested his improved diving bell himself, descending into the waters of Pagham harbor in Sussex in the summer of 1691. According to his own account, Halley sat on a bench suspended across the lower reaches of the bell and remained dry except for his showes. Noting the effects of increased air pressure as the bell descends, he describes the physical sensations produced on the Eustachian tubes during the dive: 'The only inconvenience that attends [the descent] is found in the ears, within which there are cavities opening only outwards, and that by pores so small as not to give admission even to the air itself, unless they be dilated and distended by considerable force. Hence, a pressure begins to be felt on each ear, which by degrees grows painful, like as if a quill were forcibly thrust into the hole of the ear; till at length, the force overcoming the obstacle, that which constrains these pores yields to the pressure, and letting some condensed air slip in, present ease ensues'" (Ecott, Neutral Buoyancy, 19-20). ALSO INCLUDED are two other Halley papers, both on the astronomical phenomena of objects in the sky that produce light but do not contain a sun 'nebulae'. ALSO INCLUDED is Cotes' "Logometria Auctore Rogero Cotes," his only paper and the one in which he provides the first proof of the relation between exponential function to trigonometric functions -- the identity now known as Euler's formula. ALSO INCLUDED are two papers in which Desaguliers and Newton write about Newton's theory of light and colours. ALSO INCLUDED is Taylor's important deduction that "at the distance of nine fee

      [Bookseller: Atticus Rare Books]
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        Der Cronicken Der drey Orden deß Heiligen Francisci Seraphici I.-VI. Theil. Welchen verbessert und abermahl zum Druck gebracht. Zus. 6 Teile in 3 Bänden (komplett).

      Prag, Johann Nicolaus Hampel, 1691-1689.. Folio (30 x 19 cm). Zus. ca. 2000 Seiten. Mit 3 gestochenen Kupfertiteln und 6 Drucktiteln. Prächtige barocke Kalbslederbände über Holzdeckel mit je 2 Schließen mit reich geprägten Deckeln.. *VD17 23:294954V. Band I/II datiert 1691 (der Kupfertitel 1690), Band 5/6 datiert 1689, der Kupfertitel dort ebenfalls 1690 - identisch zu dem Exemplar im VD17. - Sannig (1638-1684) war ein Franziskaner schlesischer Abstammung und mehrfach Provinzial der böhmischen Ordensprovinz. Neben theologischen Schriften verfasste er die vorliegende umfangreiche Chronik des Franziskanerordens. - Vollständiges Exemplar in außerordentlich schön gearbeiteten Barockeinbänden. - Band I/II mit ein paar kleinen unbedeutenden Wurmspuren am unteren Rücken, gelegentlich leicht gebräunt. Das Metallstück eines der 6 Schließbügel ist lose. Insgesamt jedoch ein Prachtexemplar in sauberer und sehr guter Erhaltung.

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        Consejos de la Sabiduria, ó compendio de las máximas de Salomon,. . que le son mas necessarias al hombre, para portarse sabiamente. Con reflexiones sobre estas máximas por. Es obra moral, y politica, muy util para Reyes, Señores y Ministros.

      1691. . 1691 - Imprenta de Antonio Roman. Madrid. . 1 Vol. . 14 H.+353 pp.+34 H. Cuarto Menor. Pasta española. Religión / Teología / Ética / Monasterios /Ordenes Religiosas (Ética y Moral), Siglo XVII . Edición muy cuidada, con el texto encuadrado y anotaciones en los márgenes que ayudan al seguimiento y comprensión del texto, de este compendio de máximas y aforismos, atribuidos por el autor al rey bíblico Salomón, paradigma de la sabiduría en la cultura católica de la época. Encuadernado en pasta española, con dorados y tejuelo rojo en lomera. Perfecto estado.

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        IGERET ORKHOT OLAM/ id est/ ITINERA MUNDI/ sic dicta nempe COSMOGRAPHIA/ autore/ ABRAHAMO PERITSOL/ Latina versione donavit & Notas passim adjecit Thomas Hyde S. T. D. e Coll. Reginae Oxon. Protobibliothecarius Bodlejanus. Calce exponitur Turcarum LITURGIA, PEREGRINATION MECCANA, Aegrotorum visitation, circumcision, & c. Accedit Castilgatio IN Angelum a Sto. Joseph, al. dictum de la Brosse, Carmelitam¿ Oxonii [=Oxford], Sheldon theatre, 1691

      E Theatro Sheldoniano, impensis Henrici Bonwick,, Oxford, Great Britain 1691 - IGERET ORKHOT OLAM/ id est/ ITINERA MUNDI/ sic dicta nempe COSMOGRAPHIA/ autore/ ABRAHAMO PERITSOL/ Latina versione donavit & Notas passim adjecit Thomas Hyde S. T. D. e Coll. Reginae Oxon. Protobibliothecarius Bodlejanus. Calce exponitur Turcarum LITURGIA, PEREGRINATION MECCANA, Aegrotorum visitation, circumcision, & c. Accedit Castilgatio In Angelum a Sto. Joseph, al. dictum de la Brosse, Carmelitam Oxonii [=Oxford], Sheldon theatre, 1691 8f [=16 pages], pages 1-196, 4, 1-31. Worn old ¾ red leather with paper covered boards. Top edge gilt. Inner boards and facing flyleaf marbled. A few pages have notations in old hand. Bilingual edition: most pages include two columns, Hebrew and Latin. Steinschneider 4222, 2 column 689. Roest 34. Wing F-438. Vinograd. Oxford 4; Geography/Americana. Hebrew and Latin. Translated by Thomas Hyde. Oxford: Sheldon. The author, Abraham ben Mordechai Farissol (1452-1528), a Renaissance Jew, was a contemporary of Christopher Columbus. Farissol served as scribe, educator, cantor in the Ferrara synagogue, communal leader, polemicist and biblical exegete. He was born in Avignon, France, but spent most of his life in Ferrara and Mantua This fascinating work represents Farissol¿s foray into geography. It so interested Thomas Hyde, the Chief Librarian at the Bodleian Library and Professor of Hebrew at Oxford, that he translated it into Latin with the aid of contemporary Jewish scholars and published it in this parallel Hebrew and Latin edition. It is the first Latin edition of this work. It is also the first Hebrew book to describe the discovery of the New World (Chapter 18, 29) and it contains a fascinating discourse on the Ten Lost Tribes (Chapter 14). In addition to being a pioneering work on geography, it is also the first Hebrew text to contain a description of America. Bound with Tractatus Alberti Bobovii [Muslim Liturgy and Religious Practices] (Oxford 1690). Text in Latin and Osmanli (Turkish in Arabic characters), with notes by the Editor, Thomas Hyde. Oxford, Sheldon Theatre: 1691. The Igeret Orkhot Olam is a pioneering work on geography. First published in Ferrara in 1524. Besides its rudimentary description of the "Erets Hadasha" (The New World), the book also contains a valuable reference to the enigmatic personality of David Reubeni (chapter 14). For a thorough account of his Farissol's life and achievements, see David B. Ruderman, The World of a Renaissance Jew: The Life and Thought of Abraham ben Mordecai Farissol (Cincinnati, 1981); see also Andre Neher, Jewish Thought and the Scientific Revolution of the 16th century (Oxford, 1986), pages 122-135; and EJ, volume VI, columns 1184-1185. According to the preface to the second work, present here, but often missing, is another work translated by Hyde, a tract on the religious ceremonies of the Turks. (ESTC R27480; Sabin 60934). Albert Bobowski was a Polish interloper in the Ottoman Empire who, in recognition of his linguistic ability, was given the title "Turgeman Bashi" (Chief interpreter) by Sultan Mohammed IV. Bobowski recorded Muslim practices, including the hajj to Mecca and the Muslim rites of circumcision. Scans are available upon request. [Attributes: Hard Cover]

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        [Igeret orhot shalem], id est, Itinera mundi, sic dicta nempe cosmographia.

      Oxford, Sheldonian Theatre, 1691.. (16), 196 pp. (With:) Bobowski, Wojciech / Hyde, Thomas. Tractatus Alberti Bobovii Turcarum Imp. Mohammedis IVti olim interpretis primarii, de Turcarum liturgia, peregrinatio Meccana, circumcisione, aegrotorum visitatione etc. Ibid., 1690. (2), 31, (1) pp. Marbled half calf with giltstamped title to spine. Top edge gilt.. First Latin edition of the cosmographical and geographical work of Abraham Farissol, first published in Hebrew in 1586. Includes the Hebrew text together with the Latin translation by Thomas Hyde and copious notes, including sections in Arabic. Farissol incorporated accounts of Portuguese and Spanish exploration including the New World and Vasco da Gama's voyage to India. Also includes a work on Turkish liturgy and the pilgrimage to Mecca by Wojciech Bobowski, a renegade Pole employed as a teacher, interpreter and musician at the Ottoman court of Mahomet IV. Composed at the behest of Thomas Smith (1683-1719) during his tenure as chaplain to the English ambassador at Constantinople, the manuscript was bought back to England and translated into Latin by Hyde. - Binding rubbed and chafed, otherwise in good condition. - Auboyneau 265 (p. 34). Wing F438. Sabin 60934. Steinschneider 4222 no. 2. Fürst I, 276. Not in Blackmer or Atabey.

      [Bookseller: Antiquariat Inlibris, Gilhofer Nfg. GmbH]
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        An Account of Several Extraordinary Meteors or Lights in the Sky" pp. 159-164; "An Account of Several Nebulae or Lucid Spots Like Clouds, Lately Discovered among the Fixt Stars by Help of the Telescope" pp. 390-392;"Methodus Singularis Qua Solis Parallaxis Sive Distantia a Terra" pp. 454-464; "The Art of Living under Water: Or, a Discourse concerning the Means of Furnishing Air at the Bottom of the Sea in Any Ordinary Depths" pp. 492-499 (Halley) WITH "Logometria Auctore Rogero Cotes" pp. 5-45 (Cotes); "An Account of Some Experiments of Light and Colours Formerly Made by Sir Isaac Newton, and Mention'd in His Opticks" pp. 433-447 (Newton and Desaguliers); "A Plain and Easy Experiment to Confirm Sir Isaac Newton's Doctrine of the Different Refrangibility of the Rays of Light" pp. 448-452; "An Account of an Experiment made by Dr. Brook Taylor assisted by Mr. Hauksbee, in order to discover the Law of Magnetical Attraction" pp. 294

      FIRST EDITION, FIRST ISSUE OF A NUMBER OF IMPORTANT HALLEY PAPERS, INCLUDING TWO ON THE ASTRONOMICAL PHENOMENA OF OBJECTS IN THE SKY IN THE SKY THAT PRODUCE LIGHT BUT DO NOT CONTAIN A SUN 'NEBULAE.' The Phil Trans is the oldest continuously published journal of an academy of science. As such, the Phil Trans established the important principles of scientific priority and peer review that have become the central foundations of scientific journals ever since. Works in every field of science are present; in addition to those of Hauksbee, there are papers by Cotes, Newton, Desaguliers, and Taylor. ALSO INCLUDED: First edition of Edmund Halley's description of his diving bell. Though Halley lodged a patent for his diving bell in 1691, this 1716 Phil Trans paper was his first public description of his improved device. "Halley's paper, 'The Art of Living Underwater,' sets out the problems as he saw them of the bells constructed at the time. Bells were in use in shallow water throughout Europe, and there had been several notable cases of salvage... [but] Halley was keen to improve on the system, which involvwed hauling the diver and his bell all the way to the surface in order to replenish the air inside the container. He proposed a method whereby barrels of fresh air could be lowered to the bell, and emptied into it by means of a hose. Stale air would be let out from the top end of the bell through a stopcock. ALSO INCLUDED is "Logometria Auctore Rogero Cotes," his only paper and the one in which he provides the first proof of the relation between exponential function to trigonometric functions -- the identity now known as Euler's formula. ALSO INCLUDED are two papers in which Desaguliers and Newton write about Newton's theory of light and colours. ALSO INCLUDED is Taylor's important deduction that "at the distance of nine feet, the power alters faster, than as the cubes of the distances, whereas at the distances of one and two feet, the power alters nearly as their square." "Several important early diciples of Newton, particularly his assistants Francis Hauksbee and Brook Taylor... accordingly undertook to obtain by experiment a magnetic analog to the law of gravitation. Newton speaks of 'magnetic attraction,' which might imply the force of attraction between two magnets, but Taylor and Hauksbee measured the field of the magnet at different distances from the lodestone. Desaguliers' and Newton's papers about Newton's theory of light and colours. CONDITION & DETAILS: In: Philosophical Transactions. Giving Some Account of the Present Undertakings, Studies and Labours of the Ingenious, In many Considerable Parts of the World, Volume XXIX [29], For the Years 1714, 1715, 1716. London: Printed for W. Innys, at the Princes-Arms in St. Paul's Church-Yard. 1717. Quarto (9 x 6.5; 225 x 163mm). [6], 544, [4]. Includes 3 page index. 13 copperplate engravings. Full volume, complete. Handsomely rebound in aged calf. 5 raised bands at the spine, each gilt-ruled; gilt-tooled fleur de lis at the spine. Red and black, gilt-lettered morocco spine labels. Tightly and solidly bound. New endpaopers. Occasional light toning and foxing. By any measure, near fine condition.

      [Bookseller: Atticus Rare Books]
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        An Account of an Experiment made by Dr. Brook Taylor assisted by Mr. Hauksbee, in order to discover the Law of Magnetical Attraction" pp. 294-295 (Taylor) WITH "An Account of Some Experiments of Light and Colours Formerly Made by Sir Isaac Newton, and Mention'd in His Opticks" pp. 433-447 (Newton and Desaguliers); "A Plain and Easy Experiment to Confirm Sir Isaac Newton's Doctrine of the Different Refrangibility of the Rays of Light" pp. 448-452; WITH "Logometria Auctore Rogero Cotes" pp. 5-45 (Cotes); WITH "The Art of Living under Water: Or, a Discourse concerning the Means of Furnishing Air at the Bottom of the Sea in Any Ordinary Depths" (pp. 492-499); "An Account of Several Extraordinary Meteors or Lights in the Sky" (pp. 159-164); "An Account of Several Nebulae or Lucid Spots Like Clouds, Lately Discovered among the Fixt Stars by Help of the Telescope" (pp. 390-392);"Methodus Singularis Qua Solis Parallaxis Sive Distantia a Ter

      FIRST EDITION OF BROOK TAYLOR'S important deduction that "at the distance of nine feet, the power alters faster, than as the cubes of the distances, whereas at the distances of one and two feet, the power alters nearly as their square." "Several important early disciples of Newton, particularly his assistants Francis Hauksbee and Brook Taylor... accordingly undertook to obtain by experiment a magnetic analog to the law of gravitation. Newton speaks of 'magnetic attraction,' which might imply the force of attraction between two magnets, but Taylor and Hauksbee measured the field of the magnet at different distances from the lodestone. Desaguliers' and Newton's papers about Newton's theory of light and colours. The Phil Trans is the oldest continuously published journal of an academy of science. As such, the Phil Trans established the important principles of scientific priority and peer review that have become the central foundations of scientific journals ever since. Works in every field of science are present; in addition to those of Hauksbee, there are papers by Cotes, Newton, Desaguliers, and Halley. WITH First edition of Edmund Halley's description of his diving bell. Though Halley lodged a patent for his diving bell in 1691, this 1716 Phil Trans paper was his first public description of his improved device. "Halley's paper, 'The Art of Living Underwater,' sets out the problems as he saw them of the bells constructed at the time. Bells were in use in shallow water throughout Europe, and there had been several notable cases of salvage... [but] Halley was keen to improve on the system, which involvwed hauling the diver and his bell all the way to the surface in order to replenish the air inside the container. He proposed a method whereby barrels of fresh air could be lowered to the bell, and emptied into it by means of a hose. Stale air would be let out from the top end of the bell through a stopcock. He tells us that air in an enclosed space loses its 'vivifying spirit,' and wisely states that he will not go into the precise physiological reasons for this, leaving that to the 'curious anatomist, to whom the structure of the lungs is better understood.' But Halley does understand that current models of diving bells contained only a small amount of air, and while it had been proposed to pump fresh air into them from the surface, the strength of the pumps available at the time was not sufficient to overcome the pressure at depths of more than fifteen feet or so. The deeper a bell descended, the smaller the air space that would be left in which to breathe, as the water pressure would compress the air inside the bell. Edmund Halley's bell was bigger and more stable than those of his contemporaries, and he further proposed that a diver might make excursions from the bell wearing a miniature bell on his head. What he suggested was a primitive diving helmet, which would be attached by a leather pipe to the large bell, although even at publication he does not reveal the precise details of this device. Unlike other scientific brains of the age, Halley tested his improved diving bell himself, descending into the waters of Pagham harbor in Sussex in the summer of 1691. According to his own account, Halley sat on a bench suspended across the lower reaches of the bell and remained dry except for his showes. Noting the effects of increased air pressure as the bell descends, he describes the physical sensations produced on the Eustachian tubes during the dive: 'The only inconvenience that attends [the descent] is found in the ears, within which there are cavities opening only outwards, and that by pores so small as not to give admission even to the air itself, unless they be dilated and distended by considerable force. Hence, a pressure begins to be felt on each ear, which by degrees grows painful, like as if a quill were forcibly thrust into the hole of the ear; till at length, the force overcoming the obstacle, that which constrains these pores yields to the pressure, and letting some condensed air slip in, present ease ensues'" (Ecott, Neutral Buoyancy, 19-20). ALSO INCLUDED are two other Halley papers, both on the astronomical phenomena of objects in the sky that produce light but do not contain a sun 'nebulae'. ALSO INCLUDED is Cotes' "Logometria Auctore Rogero Cotes," his only paper and the one in which he provides the first proof of the relation between exponential function to trigonometric functions -- the identity now known as Euler's formula. CONDITION & DETAILS: In: Philosophical Transactions. Giving Some Account of the Present Undertakings, Studies and Labours of the Ingenious, In many Considerable Parts of the World, Volume XXIX [29], For the Years 1714, 1715, 1716. London: Printed for W. Innys, at the Princes-Arms in St. Paul's Church-Yard. 1717. Quarto (9 x 6.5; 225 x 163mm). [6], 544, [4]. Includes 3 page index. 13 copperplate engravings. Full volume, complete. Handsomely rebound in aged calf. 5 raised bands at the spine, each gilt-ruled; gilt-tooled fleur de lis at the spine. Red and black, gilt-lettered morocco spine labels. Tightly and solidly bound. New endpaopers. Occasional light toning and foxing. By any measure, near fine condition.

      [Bookseller: Atticus Rare Books]
 36.   Check availability:     Biblio     Link/Print  


        An Account of Some Experiments of Light and Colours Formerly Made by Sir Isaac Newton, and Mention'd in His Opticks" pp. 433-447 (Newton and Desaguliers); "A Plain and Easy Experiment to Confirm Sir Isaac Newton's Doctrine of the Different Refrangibility of the Rays of Light" pp. 448-452; WITH "Logometria Auctore Rogero Cotes" pp. 5-45 (Cotes); WITH "The Art of Living under Water: Or, a Discourse concerning the Means of Furnishing Air at the Bottom of the Sea in Any Ordinary Depths" (pp. 492-499); "An Account of Several Extraordinary Meteors or Lights in the Sky" (pp. 159-164); "An Account of Several Nebulae or Lucid Spots Like Clouds, Lately Discovered among the Fixt Stars by Help of the Telescope" (pp. 390-392);"Methodus Singularis Qua Solis Parallaxis Sive Distantia a Terra" pp. 454-464; (Halley) WITH "An Account of an Experiment made by Dr. Brook Taylor assisted by Mr. Hauksbee, in order to discover the Law of Magnetical Attract

      FIRST EDITION OF DESAGULIERS AND NEWTON PAPERS ABOUT NEWTON'S THEORY OF LIGHT AND COLOURS. First edition of Edmund Halley's description of his diving bell. The Phil Trans is the oldest continuously published journal of an academy of science. As such, the Phil Trans established the important principles of scientific priority and peer review that have become the central foundations of scientific journals ever since. Works in every field of science are present; in addition to those of Hauksbee, there are papers by Cotes, Newton, Desaguliers, and Taylor. Though Halley lodged a patent for his diving bell in 1691, this 1716 Phil Trans paper was his first public description of his improved device. "Halley's paper, 'The Art of Living Underwater,' sets out the problems as he saw them of the bells constructed at the time. Bells were in use in shallow water throughout Europe, and there had been several notable cases of salvage... [but] Halley was keen to improve on the system, which involvwed hauling the diver and his bell all the way to the surface in order to replenish the air inside the container. He proposed a method whereby barrels of fresh air could be lowered to the bell, and emptied into it by means of a hose. Stale air would be let out from the top end of the bell through a stopcock. He tells us that air in an enclosed space loses its 'vivifying spirit,' and wisely states that he will not go into the precise physiological reasons for this, leaving that to the 'curious anatomist, to whom the structure of the lungs is better understood.' But Halley does understand that current models of diving bells contained only a small amount of air, and while it had been proposed to pump fresh air into them from the surface, the strength of the pumps available at the time was not sufficient to overcome the pressure at depths of more than fifteen feet or so. The deeper a bell descended, the smaller the air space that would be left in which to breathe, as the water pressure would compress the air inside the bell. Edmund Halley's bell was bigger and more stable than those of his contemporaries, and he further proposed that a diver might make excursions from the bell wearing a miniature bell on his head. What he suggested was a primitive diving helmet, which would be attached by a leather pipe to the large bell, although even at publication he does not reveal the precise details of this device. Unlike other scientific brains of the age, Halley tested his improved diving bell himself, descending into the waters of Pagham harbor in Sussex in the summer of 1691. According to his own account, Halley sat on a bench suspended across the lower reaches of the bell and remained dry except for his showes. Noting the effects of increased air pressure as the bell descends, he describes the physical sensations produced on the Eustachian tubes during the dive: 'The only inconvenience that attends [the descent] is found in the ears, within which there are cavities opening only outwards, and that by pores so small as not to give admission even to the air itself, unless they be dilated and distended by considerable force. Hence, a pressure begins to be felt on each ear, which by degrees grows painful, like as if a quill were forcibly thrust into the hole of the ear; till at length, the force overcoming the obstacle, that which constrains these pores yields to the pressure, and letting some condensed air slip in, present ease ensues'" (Ecott, Neutral Buoyancy, 19-20). ALSO INCLUDED are two other Halley papers, both on the astronomical phenomena of objects in the sky that produce light but do not contain a sun 'nebulae'. ALSO INCLUDED is Cotes' "Logometria Auctore Rogero Cotes," his only paper and the one in which he provides the first proof of the relation between exponential function to trigonometric functions -- the identity now known as Euler's formula. ALSO INCLUDED is Taylor's important deduction that "at the distance of nine feet, the power alters faster, than as the cubes of the distances, whereas at the distances of one and two feet, the power alters nearly as their square." "Several important early diciples of Newton, particularly his assistants Francis Hauksbee and Brook Taylor... accordingly undertook to obtain by experiment a magnetic analog to the law of gravitation. Newton speaks of 'magnetic attraction,' which might imply the force of attraction between two magnets, but Taylor and Hauksbee measured the field of the magnet at different distances from the lodestone. Desaguliers' and Newton's papers about Newton's theory of light and colours. CONDITION & DETAILS: In: Philosophical Transactions. Giving Some Account of the Present Undertakings, Studies and Labours of the Ingenious, In many Considerable Parts of the World, Volume XXIX [29], For the Years 1714, 1715, 1716. London: Printed for W. Innys, at the Princes-Arms in St. Paul's Church-Yard. 1717. Quarto (9 x 6.5; 225 x 163mm). [6], 544, [4]. Includes 3 page index. 13 copperplate engravings. Full volume, complete. Handsomely rebound in aged calf. 5 raised bands at the spine, each gilt-ruled; gilt-tooled fleur de lis at the spine. Red and black, gilt-lettered morocco spine labels. Tightly and solidly bound. New endpaopers. Occasional light toning and foxing. By any measure, near fine condition.

      [Bookseller: Atticus Rare Books]
 37.   Check availability:     Biblio     Link/Print  


        The Art of Living under Water: Or, a Discourse concerning the Means of Furnishing Air at the Bottom of the Sea in Any Ordinary Depths" pp. 492-499; "An Account of Several Nebulae or Lucid Spots Like Clouds, Lately Discovered among the Fixt Stars by Help of the Telescope" (pp. 390-392);"Methodus Singularis Qua Solis Parallaxis Sive Distantia a Terra" pp. 454-464; "An Account of Several Extraordinary Meteors or Lights in the Sky" (pp. 159-164); (Halley) WITH "Logometria Auctore Rogero Cotes" pp. 5-45 (Cotes); "An Account of Some Experiments of Light and Colours Formerly Made by Sir Isaac Newton, and Mention'd in His Opticks" pp. 433-447 (Newton and Desaguliers); "A Plain and Easy Experiment to Confirm Sir Isaac Newton's Doctrine of the Different Refrangibility of the Rays of Light" pp. 448-452; "An Account of an Experiment made by Dr. Brook Taylor assisted by Mr. Hauksbee, in order to discover the Law of Magnetical Attraction" pp

      FIRST EDITION, FIRST ISSUE OF EDMUND HALLEY'S DESCRIPTION OF HIS DIVING BELL. The Phil Trans is the oldest continuously published journal of an academy of science. As such, the Phil Trans established the important principles of scientific priority and peer review that have become the central foundations of scientific journals ever since. Works in every field of science are present; in addition to those of Hauksbee, there are papers by Cotes, Newton, Desaguliers, and Taylor. Though Halley lodged a patent for his diving bell in 1691, this 1716 Phil Trans paper was his first public description of his improved device. "Halley's paper, 'The Art of Living Underwater,' sets out the problems as he saw them of the bells constructed at the time. Bells were in use in shallow water throughout Europe, and there had been several notable cases of salvage... [but] Halley was keen to improve on the system, which involvwed hauling the diver and his bell all the way to the surface in order to replenish the air inside the container. He proposed a method whereby barrels of fresh air could be lowered to the bell, and emptied into it by means of a hose. Stale air would be let out from the top end of the bell through a stopcock. He tells us that air in an enclosed space loses its 'vivifying spirit,' and wisely states that he will not go into the precise physiological reasons for this, leaving that to the 'curious anatomist, to whom the structure of the lungs is better understood.' But Halley does understand that current models of diving bells contained only a small amount of air, and while it had been proposed to pump fresh air into them from the surface, the strength of the pumps available at the time was not sufficient to overcome the pressure at depths of more than fifteen feet or so. The deeper a bell descended, the smaller the air space that would be left in which to breathe, as the water pressure would compress the air inside the bell. Edmund Halley's bell was bigger and more stable than those of his contemporaries, and he further proposed that a diver might make excursions from the bell wearing a miniature bell on his head. What he suggested was a primitive diving helmet, which would be attached by a leather pipe to the large bell, although even at publication he does not reveal the precise details of this device. Unlike other scientific brains of the age, Halley tested his improved diving bell himself, descending into the waters of Pagham harbor in Sussex in the summer of 1691. According to his own account, Halley sat on a bench suspended across the lower reaches of the bell and remained dry except for his showes. Noting the effects of increased air pressure as the bell descends, he describes the physical sensations produced on the Eustachian tubes during the dive: 'The only inconvenience that attends [the descent] is found in the ears, within which there are cavities opening only outwards, and that by pores so small as not to give admission even to the air itself, unless they be dilated and distended by considerable force. Hence, a pressure begins to be felt on each ear, which by degrees grows painful, like as if a quill were forcibly thrust into the hole of the ear; till at length, the force overcoming the obstacle, that which constrains these pores yields to the pressure, and letting some condensed air slip in, present ease ensues'" (Ecott, Neutral Buoyancy, 19-20). ALSO INCLUDED are two other Halley papers, both on the astronomical phenomena of objects in the sky that produce light but do not contain a sun 'nebulae'. ALSO INCLUDED is Cotes' "Logometria Auctore Rogero Cotes," his only paper and the one in which he provides the first proof of the relation between exponential function to trigonometric functions -- the identity now known as Euler's formula. ALSO INCLUDED are two papers in which Desaguliers and Newton write about Newton's theory of light and colours. ALSO INCLUDED is Taylor's important deduction that "at the distance of nine feet, the power alters faster, than as the cubes of the distances, whereas at the distances of one and two feet, the power alters nearly as their square." "Several important early diciples of Newton, particularly his assistants Francis Hauksbee and Brook Taylor... accordingly undertook to obtain by experiment a magnetic analog to the law of gravitation. Newton speaks of 'magnetic attraction,' which might imply the force of attraction between two magnets, but Taylor and Hauksbee measured the field of the magnet at different distances from the lodestone. Desaguliers' and Newton's papers about Newton's theory of light and colours. CONDITION & DETAILS: In: Philosophical Transactions. Giving Some Account of the Present Undertakings, Studies and Labours of the Ingenious, In many Considerable Parts of the World, Volume XXIX [29], For the Years 1714, 1715, 1716. London: Printed for W. Innys, at the Princes-Arms in St. Paul's Church-Yard. 1717. Quarto (9 x 6.5; 225 x 163mm). [6], 544, [4]. Includes 3 page index. 13 copperplate engravings. Full volume, complete. Handsomely rebound in aged calf. 5 raised bands at the spine, each gilt-ruled; gilt-tooled fleur de lis at the spine. Red and black, gilt-lettered morocco spine labels. Tightly and solidly bound. New endpaopers. Occasional light toning and foxing. By any measure, near fine condition.

      [Bookseller: Atticus Rare Books]
 38.   Check availability:     Biblio     Link/Print  


        Logometria Auctore Rogero Cotes" pp. 5-45 (Cotes); WITH "The Art of Living under Water: Or, a Discourse concerning the Means of Furnishing Air at the Bottom of the Sea in Any Ordinary Depths" (pp. 492-499); "An Account of Several Extraordinary Meteors or Lights in the Sky" (pp. 159-164); "An Account of Several Nebulae or Lucid Spots Like Clouds, Lately Discovered among the Fixt Stars by Help of the Telescope" (pp. 390-392);"Methodus Singularis Qua Solis Parallaxis Sive Distantia a Terra" pp. 454-464; (Halley) WITH "An Account of Some Experiments of Light and Colours Formerly Made by Sir Isaac Newton, and Mention'd in His Opticks" pp. 433-447 (Newton and Desaguliers); "A Plain and Easy Experiment to Confirm Sir Isaac Newton's Doctrine of the Different Refrangibility of the Rays of Light" pp. 448-452; WITH "An Account of an Experiment made by Dr. Brook Taylor assisted by Mr. Hauksbee, in order to discover the Law of Magnetical Attract

      FIRST EDITION of Roger Cotes' "Logometria Auctore Rogero Cotes," his only paper and the one in which he provides the first proof of the relation between exponential function to trigonometric functions -- the identity now known as Euler's formula. The Phil Trans is the oldest continuously published journal of an academy of science. As such, the Phil Trans established the important principles of scientific priority and peer review that have become the central foundations of scientific journals ever since. Works in every field of science are present; in addition to those of Hauksbee, there are papers by Halley, Newton, Desaguliers, and Taylor. ALSO INCLUDED: First edition of Edmund Halley's description of his diving bell. Though Halley lodged a patent for his diving bell in 1691, this 1716 Phil Trans paper was his first public description of his improved device. "Halley's paper, 'The Art of Living Underwater,' sets out the problems as he saw them of the bells constructed at the time. Bells were in use in shallow water throughout Europe, and there had been several notable cases of salvage... [but] Halley was keen to improve on the system, which involvwed hauling the diver and his bell all the way to the surface in order to replenish the air inside the container. He proposed a method whereby barrels of fresh air could be lowered to the bell, and emptied into it by means of a hose. Stale air would be let out from the top end of the bell through a stopcock. He tells us that air in an enclosed space loses its 'vivifying spirit,' and wisely states that he will not go into the precise physiological reasons for this, leaving that to the 'curious anatomist, to whom the structure of the lungs is better understood.' But Halley does understand that current models of diving bells contained only a small amount of air, and while it had been proposed to pump fresh air into them from the surface, the strength of the pumps available at the time was not sufficient to overcome the pressure at depths of more than fifteen feet or so. The deeper a bell descended, the smaller the air space that would be left in which to breathe, as the water pressure would compress the air inside the bell. Edmund Halley's bell was bigger and more stable than those of his contemporaries, and he further proposed that a diver might make excursions from the bell wearing a miniature bell on his head. What he suggested was a primitive diving helmet, which would be attached by a leather pipe to the large bell, although even at publication he does not reveal the precise details of this device. Unlike other scientific brains of the age, Halley tested his improved diving bell himself, descending into the waters of Pagham harbor in Sussex in the summer of 1691. According to his own account, Halley sat on a bench suspended across the lower reaches of the bell and remained dry except for his showes. Noting the effects of increased air pressure as the bell descends, he describes the physical sensations produced on the Eustachian tubes during the dive: 'The only inconvenience that attends [the descent] is found in the ears, within which there are cavities opening only outwards, and that by pores so small as not to give admission even to the air itself, unless they be dilated and distended by considerable force. Hence, a pressure begins to be felt on each ear, which by degrees grows painful, like as if a quill were forcibly thrust into the hole of the ear; till at length, the force overcoming the obstacle, that which constrains these pores yields to the pressure, and letting some condensed air slip in, present ease ensues'" (Ecott, Neutral Buoyancy, 19-20). ALSO INCLUDED are two other Halley papers, both on the astronomical phenomena of objects in the sky that produce light but do not contain a sun 'nebulae'. ALSO INCLUDED are two papers in which Desaguliers and Newton write about Newton's theory of light and colours. Desaguliers' optical experiments here were for the most paper retetitions of those described by Newton, made in order to vindicate Newton's accuracy -- which had been challenged -- and the theoretical conclusions Newton had drawn. Some of them were improved in detail -- for example, by the use of a camera obscura. Part of the success of Newtonian optics was due to those who spoke in defense of Newton's ideas, those who popularized them; Desaguliers was prominent in this role. ALSO INCLUDED is Taylor's important deduction that "at the distance of nine feet, the power alters faster, than as the cubes of the distances, whereas at the distances of one and two feet, the power alters nearly as their square." "Several important early diciples of Newton, particularly his assistants Francis Hauksbee and Brook Taylor... accordingly undertook to obtain by experiment a magnetic analog to the law of gravitation. Newton speaks of 'magnetic attraction,' which might imply the force of attraction between two magnets, but Taylor and Hauksbee measured the field of the magnet at different distances from the lodestone. Desaguliers' and Newton's papers about Newton's theory of light and colours. CONDITION & DETAILS: In: Philosophical Transactions. Giving Some Account of the Present Undertakings, Studies and Labours of the Ingenious, In many Considerable Parts of the World, Volume XXIX [29], For the Years 1714, 1715, 1716. London: Printed for W. Innys, at the Princes-Arms in St. Paul's Church-Yard. 1717. Quarto (9 x 6.5; 225 x 163mm). [6], 544, [4]. Includes 3 page index. 13 copperplate engravings. Full volume, complete. Handsomely rebound in aged calf. 5 raised bands at the spine, each gilt-ruled; gilt-tooled fleur de lis at the spine. Red and black, gilt-lettered morocco spine labels. Tightly and solidly bound. New endpaopers. Occasional light toning and foxing. By any measure, near fine condition.

      [Bookseller: Atticus Rare Books]
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        An Account of Several Extraordinary Meteors or Lights in the Sky" pp. 159-164; "An Account of Several Nebulae or Lucid Spots Like Clouds, Lately Discovered among the Fixt Stars by Help of the Telescope" pp. 390-392;"Methodus Singularis Qua Solis Parallaxis Sive Distantia a Terra" pp. 454-464; "The Art of Living under Water: Or, a Discourse concerning the Means of Furnishing Air at the Bottom of the Sea in Any Ordinary Depths" pp. 492-499 (Halley) WITH "Logometria Auctore Rogero Cotes" pp. 5-45 (Cotes); "An Account of Some Experiments of Light and Colours Formerly Made by Sir Isaac Newton, and Mention'd in His Opticks" pp. 433-447 (Newton and Desaguliers); "A Plain and Easy Experiment to Confirm Sir Isaac Newton's Doctrine of the Different

      - FIRST EDITION, FIRST ISSUE OF A NUMBER OF IMPORTANT HALLEY PAPERS, INCLUDING TWO ON THE ASTRONOMICAL PHENOMENA OF OBJECTS IN THE SKY IN THE SKY THAT PRODUCE LIGHT BUT DO NOT CONTAIN A SUN 'NEBULAE.' The Phil Trans is the oldest continuously published journal of an academy of science. As such, the Phil Trans established the important principles of scientific priority and peer review that have become the central foundations of scientific journals ever since. Works in every field of science are present; in addition to those of Hauksbee, there are papers by Cotes, Newton, Desaguliers, and Taylor. ALSO INCLUDED: First edition of Edmund Halley's description of his diving bell. Though Halley lodged a patent for his diving bell in 1691, this 1716 Phil Trans paper was his first public description of his improved device. "Halley's paper, 'The Art of Living Underwater,' sets out the problems as he saw them of the bells constructed at the time. Bells were in use in shallow water throughout Europe, and there had been several notable cases of salvage. [but] Halley was keen to improve on the system, which involvwed hauling the diver and his bell all the way to the surface in order to replenish the air inside the container. He proposed a method whereby barrels of fresh air could be lowered to the bell, and emptied into it by means of a hose. Stale air would be let out from the top end of the bell through a stopcock. ALSO INCLUDED is "Logometria Auctore Rogero Cotes," his only paper and the one in which he provides the first proof of the relation between exponential function to trigonometric functions -- the identity now known as Euler's formula. ALSO INCLUDED are two papers in which Desaguliers and Newton write about Newton's theory of light and colours. ALSO INCLUDED is Taylor's important deduction that "at the distance of nine feet, the power alters faster, than as the cubes of the distances, whereas at the distances of one and two feet, the power alters nearly as their square." "Several important early diciples of Newton, particularly his assistants Francis Hauksbee and Brook Taylor. accordingly undertook to obtain by experiment a magnetic analog to the law of gravitation. Newton speaks of 'magnetic attraction,' which might imply the force of attraction between two magnets, but Taylor and Hauksbee measured the field of the magnet at different distances from the lodestone. Desaguliers' and Newton's papers about Newton's theory of light and colours. CONDITION & DETAILS: In: Philosophical Transactions. Giving Some Account of the Present Undertakings, Studies and Labours of the Ingenious, In many Considerable Parts of the World, Volume XXIX [29], For the Years 1714, 1715, 1716. London: Printed for W. Innys, at the Princes-Arms in St. Paul's Church-Yard. 1717. Quarto (9 x 6.5; 225 x 163mm). [6], 544, [4]. Includes 3 page index. 13 copperplate engravings. Full volume, complete. Handsomely rebound in aged calf. 5 raised bands at the spine, each gilt-ruled; gilt-tooled fleur de lis at the spine. Red and black, gilt-lettered morocco spine labels. Tightly and solidly bound. New endpaopers. Occasional light toning and foxing. By any measure, near fine condition.

      [Bookseller: Atticus Rare Books]
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        Kst.- Karte, von H. van Loon nach G.C. da Vignola bei N. de Fer,"Principaute de Transilvanie. Divisee en cinq Nations ..".

      . mit altem Grenzkolorit,, dat. 1691, 44 x 49. Szantai, Atlas Hungaricus, De Fer 2a. - Ãœber der Karte Kopftitel in franz. Sprache, unten rechts Erklärungen zu Siebenbürgen ( franz. Sprache ).

      [Bookseller: Antiquariat Nikolaus Struck]
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        Copia de carta escrita a un caballero de la ciudad de los Reyes, dandole cuenta de la muerte del Excelentisimo Señor Duque de la Palata, en la ciudad de Portovelo, Viernes Santo 13 de Abril de 1691

      News from Portobello of the death of a Peruvian Viceroy, printed in Lima. 1691. San Felipe de Portovelo. In folio (290 mm x 190 mm). 2 ff. Unbound. Upper right corner with damp, fold traces, else good.First edition. A rare imprint printed in Lima with news of the death of Melchor Nvarra y Rocafull, more widely known as the Duque de la Palata (1626 ?" 1691); the letter is written in the form of praise, by an anonymous party and addressed to a gentleman from Lima, whom in turn had it printed. It describes the process of his sickness and attempts to cure him, prior to ecclesiastical preparation for his death, at three thirty in the afternoon, April 13, 1691. Melchor de Navarra was a military officer and Spanish colonial officer; he reached the pinnacle of his career in the Indies when appointed Viceroy of Peru (1681 ?" 1689). During his reign he fought off the pirate fleet lead by Edward Davis who had previously sacked small town on the coast, and reestablished the Casa de Moneda. He stayed in Lima until 1691 when he sailed back to Spain, stopping at Portobello (Panama), where he died of sickness.It ends with a short note referring to the deeds and achievement during the colonial administration, naming his struggle against piracy in the Pacific ports and active administration. Palau, 61299. Medina, Lima, 634.

      [Bookseller: Hs Rare Books]
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