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Displayed below are some selected recent viaLibri matches for books published in 1613

        Practica medica [.]. Additus est liber Responsorum et consulationum medicinalium [.].

      apud Trivisanum Bertolottum,, Venetiis, 1613 - In-folio (cm. 30), legatura coeva in p. pergamena floscia con antiche note ms. al piatto (lievi segni d'usura); pp.[32], 499, [5], 51, [1 b.]; [4], 48 in buono stato, capilettera testatine e finalini in xilografia, marca ai due frontespizi sempre in xilografia (pace e giustizia che si baciano); piccole gore marginali e e segni d'uso (alcune tracce di cera e note antiche). Edizione che porta in fine il celebre De Peste e a cui viene allegato per la prima volta l'inedito Responsorum, con proprio frontespizio.Opera del noto medico vicentino precursore della medicina moderna, «fra i più acuti e begli ingegni, anzi tra gli ornamenti più luminosi della nostra Patria (Vicenza)» [G. Thiene ed E. Pianezzola, introduzione alla traduzione del De Peste di D. Marrone, Antilia 2012]. Di notevole interesse farmaceutico, portante un ampio elenco di terapie (con relativi rimedi e composti farmaceutici, e le dosi per la loto preparazione). Buon esemplare assai genuino.

      [Bookseller: Gabriele Maspero Libri Antichi]
 1.   Check availability:     IberLibro     Link/Print  


        Ios. Iusti Scaligeri Iulii Caesaris a burden filii Opuscula Varia antehac non edita. Omnium catalogum post praefationem lector inveniet. Junto con De aequinoctiorum anticipatione diatriba. Nunc primum edita

      Parisiis / Lutetiae Parisiorum - Apud Hieronymum Drouart - 1610 / 1613 - 2 obras encuadernadas en un volumen en 4º, [4]+582+[4]+[8]+96 p. Buena encuadernación moderna en plena piel, levemente rozada, con nervios y ruedas en seco en lomo. Cada obra con portada propia, escudo de impresor en ambas. Algunos pasajes de la primera obra aparecen expurgados, lo cual se indica en portada con anotación manuscrita. Hijo de Julio César Escalígero, fue un erudito dedicado a la filología, la historia y la cronología. Papel algo tostado, pero buen estado general. Ilustraciones en el texto. Historia Numismática Astronomía

      [Bookseller: MIQUELEIZ ANTIGUEDADES]
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        Flos Solis prolifer [Multiflorous sunflower]

      Eichstatt, 1613. A fine copy of one of the most spectacular images from the first edition of Besler's masterpiece - the greatest of the early flower books Basil Besler published "Hortus Eystettensis", the earliest large folio-sized botanical work, at Eichstatt near Nuremburg, in 1613. He worked on the drawings for the 374 copper engravings over a period of sixteen years using the plants in the garden of his patron, Bishop Johann Conrad von Gemmingen, as his models. Depicted in this florilegium were flowers, herbs, vegetables and newly discovered plants such as tobacco and peppers. Besler was, in modern terms, a botanist and horticulturalist, and he was familiar with real and alleged medicinal properties of various plants. Besler had the good fortune to live at a time when exotic plants that were new to Europe were being shipped in from all over the world. The garden that he organized and illustrated for his patron was both ornamental and experimental, and the large book he had engraved after his drawings was unique. The prints, made by a team of master engravers, are strong and exquisitely done. Copper engraving, by Heinrich Ulrich. Text in Latin on verso. In excellent condition, apart from one small expert repair running from the right margin into a blank area of the plate.

      [Bookseller: Donald Heald Rare Books]
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        Tulipa Serotina Polyanthos

      Nurenburg. , 1613. Plate 76. Size: 400 x 470 mm. Mounted size: 630 x 720 mm. Copperplate engraving. 17th century colour. Excellent condition. Large margins. Text on reverse. One of an extremely rare collection of botanicals from Basilius Besler's Hortus Eystettensis. Besler was a Nuremburg apothecary in charge of the elaborate garden of the Bishop Prince of Eisenstatt. The plates, illustrating more than a thousand flowers were arranged according to the seasons.When the book was published in 1613, it was the largest book ever printed, and the coloured versions of the prints sold for ten times the price of those sold in black and white. The seventeenth century colouring of our prints have a very interesting pedigree. They have been examined at length by Nicolas Barker, who concluded, 'I believe these plates to come from a copy coloured according the original exemplar (that is, before the use of written instructions), probably before the middle of the 17th century.' A fuller copy of Nicolas Barker's report is available upon request. A first edition. Published in 'Hortus Eystettensis'.

      [Bookseller: Peter Harrington]
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        Lupinus Exoticus Flore Albo

      Eichstatt 1613 - 20 7/8" x 16 1/4" BESLER, Basil [1561-1629]. "Lupinus Exoticus Flore Albo." A selection from "Hortus Eystettensis." Hand-colored copperplate engraving. Eichstatt, 1613. Approximate paper size 20 7/8 x 16 1/4 inches. Basil Besler's great botanical work is a landmark of botanical documentation and pre-Linnaean classification, as well as one of the most splendidly stylized and aesthetically powerful botanical works ever produced. Besler was an apothecary and botanist who managed the gardens of Bishop Johann Conrad in Eichstatt, Germany. The Bishop's remarkable garden was one of the most extensive in Europe, containing a huge variety of European shrubs and flowering plants, as well as exotic specimens from Asia and the Americas. Besler used this encyclopedicresource as the basis for the "Hortus Eystettensis," in which he studied and depicted over a thousand flowers, representing 667 species in all. With the Bishop's patronage, he worked both as artist and publisher, directing a team of ten artists and engravers in creating 374 plates over 16 years. Published one hundred and fifty years before Linnaeus created his thorough system of classification, Besler's great florilegium represents an impressive early attempt to classify plants for the benefit of botanists, doctors and apothecaries. Each plant is given a distinct and often descriptive Latin title, and related species are grouped together on the same plate, or over a series of plates. Almost all specimens are shown complete and accurately colored, including delineations of their root systems. While Besler's work is obviously motivated by a scientific impulse to document and describe a remarkable collection of species, the beautiful presentation and dramatic stylization of the illustrations also convey a sense of the visual grandeur of the Bishop's great garden. Each specimen is placed on the page with an artist's understanding of formal and spatial relations. Most notably, the stylized depiction of foliage and root systems betrays a lively baroque sensibility, as the plants seem to dance across the page.

      [Bookseller: Arader Galleries - Houston]
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        Amarantus maior panniculis rubris, Pl. 338

      Eichstatt 1613 - Basil Besler’s (1561-1629) great botanical work, “Hortus Eystettensis” is a landmark of botanical documentation and pre-Linnaean classification, as well as one of the most splendidly stylized and aesthetically powerful botanical works ever produced. This original hand-colored copperplate engraving, Amarantus maior panniculis rubris, Pl. 338, measures 21.25" x 16.5" and is in very good condition with light foxing throughout, paper discoloration and evidence of verso page text. Illustrated on this engraving are plants commonly known as Hawk's Beard, Princes-feather and Wild Catchfly. This engraving is expertly hand-colored with the large Princes-feather in the center, colored in vibrant magenta with lush green leaves. The other two plants are expertly colored and detailed with green leaves and stems and yellow and white flowers. Also detailed on these two side plants are their root systems giving this plate a dynamic configuration. Basil Besler was an apothecary and botanist who managed the gardens of Bishop Johann Conrad in Eichstatt, Germany. The Bishop’s remarkable garden was one of the most extensive in Europe, containing a huge variety of European shrubs and flowering plants, as well as exotic specimens from Asia and the Americas. Besler used this encyclopedic resource as the basis for the “Hortus Eystettensis”, in which he studied and depicted over a thousand flowers, representing 667 species in all. With the Bishop’s patronage, he worked both as artist and publisher, directing a team of ten artists and engravers in creating 367 plates over 16 years. Published one hundred and fifty years before Linnaeus created his thorough system of classification; Besler’s great florilegium represents an impressive early attempt to classify plants for the benefit of botanists, doctors and apothecaries. Each plant is given a distinct and often descriptive Latin title, and related species are grouped together on the same plate, or over a series of plates. Almost all specimens are shown complete and accurately colored, including delineations of their root systems. While Besler’s work is obviously motivated by a scientific impulse to document and describe a remarkable collection of species, the beautiful presentation and dramatic stylization of the illustrations also convey a sense of the visual grandeur of the Bishop’s great garden. Each specimen is placed on the page with an artist’s understanding of formal and spatial relations. Most notably, the stylized depiction of foliage and root systems betrays a lively baroque sensibility, as the plants seem to dance across the page. This illustration of various flowers is among the most dramatic and desirable of Besler’s illustrations.

      [Bookseller: Arader Galleries San Francisco]
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        Scabiosa Alpina Centauroides

      Eichstatt: 1613 - Basil Besler (1561-1629) From Hortus Eystettensis Eichstatt: 1613 Hand-colored copperplate engraving (later color) 26 1/2” x 22” framed Basil Besler’s great botanical work is a landmark of botanical documentation and pre-Linnaean classification, as well as one of the most splendidly stylized and aesthetically powerful botanical works ever produced. Besler was an apothecary and botanist who managed the gardens of Bishop Johann Conrad in Eichstatt, Germany. The Bishop’s remarkable garden was one of the most extensive in Europe, containing a huge variety of European shrubs and flowering plants, as well as exotic specimens from Asia and the Americas. Besler used this encyclopedic resource as the basis for the Hortus Eystettensis, in which he studied and depicted over a thousand flowers, representing 667 species in all. With the Bishop’s patronage, he worked both as artist and publisher, directing a team of ten artists and engravers in creating 367 plates over 16 years. Published one hundred and fifty years before Linnaeus created his thorough system of classification, Besler’s great florilegium represents an impressive early attempt to classify plants for the benefit of botanists, doctors and apothecaries. Each plant is given a distinct and often descriptive Latin title, and related species are grouped together on the same plate, or over a series of plates. Almost all specimens are shown complete and accurately colored, including delineations of their root systems. While Besler’s work is obviously motivated by a scientific impulse to document and describe a remarkable collection of species, the beautiful presentation and dramatic stylization of the illustrations also convey a sense of the visual grandeur of the Bishop’s great garden. Each specimen is placed on the page with an artist’s understanding of formal and spatial relations. Most notably, the stylized depiction of foliage and root systems betrays a lively baroque sensibility, as the plants seem to dance across the page. These illustrations of various flowers are among the most dramatic and desirable of Besler’s illustrations. Each is in excellent condition, and would represent wonderful additions to any collection of European botanical art.

      [Bookseller: Arader Galleries San Francisco]
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        Ranunculus Afiaticusgrumosa radice flore pleno Sanguineo prolifero, Pl. 29

      Eichstatt, 1613 Basil Besler?s (1561-1629) great botanical work, ?Hortus Eystettensis? is a landmark of botanical documentation and pre-Linnaean classification, as well as one of the most splendidly stylized and aesthetically powerful botanical works ever produced.This original hand-colored copperplate engraving, Ranunculus Afiaticusgrumosa radice flore pleno Sanguineo prolifero, Pl. 29, measures 22.5" x 17.75" and is in very good condition with light staining throughout, tearing on the right edge and faint evidence of verso page text. Illustrated on this engraving are flowers commonly known as Double-flowered Persian buttercup, White Persian buttercup, Proliferous Persian buttercup, Persian buttercup with serrated petals and Variegated Persian buttercup each placed within their own area on the plate and labeled for distinction. Buttercups are herbaceous perennials and this engraving shows them expertly hand-colored with green stems and leaves and colorful flowers in shades of pink, crimson, orange and white. Also illustrated are their root systems, adding to thier scientific accuracy and beauty.Basil Besler was an apothecary and botanist who managed the gardens of Bishop Johann Conrad in Eichstatt, Germany. The Bishop?s remarkable garden was one of the most extensive in Europe, containing a huge variety of European shrubs and flowering plants, as well as exotic specimens from Asia and the Americas. Besler used this encyclopedic resource as the basis for the ?Hortus Eystettensis?, in which he studied and depicted over a thousand flowers, representing 667 species in all.With the Bishop?s patronage, he worked both as artist and publisher, directing a team of ten artists and engravers in creating 367 plates over 16 years. Published one hundred and fifty years before Linnaeus created his thorough system of classification; Besler?s great florilegium represents an impressive early attempt to classify plants for the benefit of botanists, doctors and apothecaries.Each plant is given a distinct and often descriptive Latin title, and related species are grouped together on the same plate, or over a series of plates. Almost all specimens are shown complete and accurately colored, including delineations of their root systems. While Besler?s work is obviously motivated by a scientific impulse to document and describe a remarkable collection of species, the beautiful presentation and dramatic stylization of the illustrations also convey a sense of the visual grandeur of the Bishop?s great garden.Each specimen is placed on the page with an artist?s understanding of formal and spatial relations. Most notably, the stylized depiction of foliage and root systems betrays a lively baroque sensibility, as the plants seem to dance across the page. This illustration of various flowers is among the most dramatic and desirable of Besler?s illustrations.

      [Bookseller: Arader Galleries]
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        Iris latifolia violaceo colore maior; Iris latifolia vulgaris coerulea; Iris latifolia maior variegata [Tall bearded garden irises (flag irises)]

      Eichstatt 1613 - Basil Besler published "Hortus Eystettensis", the earliest large folio botanical, at Eichstatt near Nuremburg, in 1613. He worked on the drawings for the 374 copper engravings over a period of sixteen years using the plants in the garden of Bishop Johann Conrad von Gemmingen, his patron. Depicted in this florilegium were flowers, herbs, vegetables and newly discovered plants such as tobacco and peppers. Besler was, in modern terms, a botanist and horticulturalist, and he was familiar with real and alleged medicinal properties of various plants. Besler had the good fortune to live at a time when exotic plants were being shipped to Europe from all over the world. The garden that he organized and illustrated for his patron was both ornamental and experimental, and the large book he had engraved after his drawings was unique. The prints, made by a team of master engravers, are strong and exquisitely done. Hand-coloured engraving.

      [Bookseller: Donald A. Heald Rare Books (ABAA)]
 9.   Check availability:     AbeBooks     Link/Print  


        Latininum flor lut., Pl. 275

      Eichstatt 1613 - Basil Besler’s (1561-1629) great botanical work, “Hortus Eystettensis” is a landmark of botanical documentation and pre-Linnaean classification, as well as one of the most splendidly stylized and aesthetically powerful botanical works ever produced. This original hand-colored copperplate engraving, Ranunculus Latininum flor lut., Pl. 275, measures 22.5" x 18.25" and is excellent condition. Illustrated on this engraving are flowering plants commonly known as Fragrant jasmine, Acanthus and white jasmine. The acanthus, with its large and finely detailed green leaves and white and pink flowers is centrally located and fills the page. The two types of jasmine rest on either side and are also superbly colored with green stems and leaves and white and yellow flowers. Basil Besler was an apothecary and botanist who managed the gardens of Bishop Johann Conrad in Eichstatt, Germany. The Bishop’s remarkable garden was one of the most extensive in Europe, containing a huge variety of European shrubs and flowering plants, as well as exotic specimens from Asia and the Americas. Besler used this encyclopedic resource as the basis for the “Hortus Eystettensis”, in which he studied and depicted over a thousand flowers, representing 667 species in all. With the Bishop’s patronage, he worked both as artist and publisher, directing a team of ten artists and engravers in creating 367 plates over 16 years. Published one hundred and fifty years before Linnaeus created his thorough system of classification; Besler’s great florilegium represents an impressive early attempt to classify plants for the benefit of botanists, doctors and apothecaries. Each plant is given a distinct and often descriptive Latin title, and related species are grouped together on the same plate, or over a series of plates. Almost all specimens are shown complete and accurately colored, including delineations of their root systems. While Besler’s work is obviously motivated by a scientific impulse to document and describe a remarkable collection of species, the beautiful presentation and dramatic stylization of the illustrations also convey a sense of the visual grandeur of the Bishop’s great garden. Each specimen is placed on the page with an artist’s understanding of formal and spatial relations. Most notably, the stylized depiction of foliage and root systems betrays a lively baroque sensibility, as the plants seem to dance across the page. This illustration of various flowers is among the most dramatic and desirable of Besler’s illustrations.

      [Bookseller: Arader Galleries San Francisco]
 10.   Check availability:     AbeBooks     Link/Print  


        Caryophyll Plenussaete Rubescens

      Eichstatt 1613 - 22 3/8" x 18 1/8" BESLER, Basil [1561-1629]. "Caryophyll Plenussaete Rubescens." A selection from "Hortus Eystettensis." Hand-colored copperplate engraving. Eichstatt, 1613. Approximate paper size 22 3/8 x 18 1/8 inches. Basil Besler's great botanical work is a landmark of botanical documentation and pre-Linnaean classification, as well as one of the most splendidly stylized and aesthetically powerful botanical works ever produced. Besler was an apothecary and botanist who managed the gardens of Bishop Johann Conrad in Eichstatt, Germany. The Bishop's remarkable garden was one of the most extensive in Europe, containing a huge variety of European shrubs and flowering plants, as well as exotic specimens from Asia and the Americas. Besler used this encyclopedicresource as the basis for the "Hortus Eystettensis," in which he studied and depicted over a thousand flowers, representing 667 species in all. With the Bishop's patronage, he worked both as artist and publisher, directing a team of ten artists and engravers in creating 374 plates over 16 years. Published one hundred and fifty years before Linnaeus created his thorough system of classification, Besler's great florilegium represents an impressive early attempt to classify plants for the benefit of botanists, doctors and apothecaries. Each plant is given a distinct and often descriptive Latin title, and related species are grouped together on the same plate, or over a series of plates. Almost all specimens are shown complete and accurately colored, including delineations of their root systems. While Besler's work is obviously motivated by a scientific impulse to document and describe a remarkable collection of species, the beautiful presentation and dramatic stylization of the illustrations also convey a sense of the visual grandeur of the Bishop's great garden. Each specimen is placed on the page with an artist's understanding of formal and spatial relations. Most notably, the stylized depiction of foliage and root systems betrays a lively baroque sensibility, as the plants seem to dance across the page.

      [Bookseller: Arader Galleries - Houston]
 11.   Check availability:     AbeBooks     Link/Print  


        Melocactos, Pl. 254

      Eichstatt 1613 - Basil Besler’s (1561-1629) great botanical work, “Hortus Eystettensis” is a landmark of botanical documentation and pre-Linnaean classification, as well as one of the most splendidly stylized and aesthetically powerful botanical works ever produced. This original hand-colored copperplate engraving, Melocactos, Pl. 254, measures 22.25" x 18" and is in excellent condition with light foxing and evidence of verso page text. Illustrated on this engraving are flowers commonly known as Pink Maltese cross, Scarlet Maltese cross and White Maltese cross. Expertly hand-colored, these herbaceous perennial plants are different shapes and colored in greens and browns, with purple, cacti-like buds on the center plant. Maltese cross plants are commonly used in gardens as decoration and were sown in Monticello by Thomas Jefferson in 1807. Basil Besler was an apothecary and botanist who managed the gardens of Bishop Johann Conrad in Eichstatt, Germany . The Bishop’s remarkable garden was one of the most extensive in Europe, containing a huge variety of European shrubs and flowering plants, as well as exotic specimens from Asia and the Americas . Besler used this encyclopedic resource as the basis for the “Hortus Eystettensis”, in which he studied and depicted over a thousand flowers, representing 667 species in all. With the Bishop’s patronage, he worked both as artist and publisher, directing a team of ten artists and engravers in creating 367 plates over 16 years. Published one hundred and fifty years before Linnaeus created his thorough system of classification; Besler’s great florilegium represents an impressive early attempt to classify plants for the benefit of botanists, doctors and apothecaries. Each plant is given a distinct and often descriptive Latin title, and related species are grouped together on the same plate, or over a series of plates. Almost all specimens are shown complete and accurately colored, including delineations of their root systems. While Besler’s work is obviously motivated by a scientific impulse to document and describe a remarkable collection of species, the beautiful presentation and dramatic stylization of the illustrations also convey a sense of the visual grandeur of the Bishop’s great garden. Each specimen is placed on the page with an artist’s understanding of formal and spatial relations. Most notably, the stylized depiction of foliage and root systems betrays a lively baroque sensibility, as the plants seem to dance across the page. This illustration of various flowers is among the most dramatic and desirable of Besler’s illustrations.

      [Bookseller: Arader Galleries San Francisco]
 12.   Check availability:     AbeBooks     Link/Print  


        Mentastrum Niveum Angelicum

      Eichstatt 1613 - 22 3/8" x 18 1/8" BESLER, Basil [1561-1629]. "Mentastrum Niveum Angelicum." A selection from "Hortus Eystettensis." Hand-colored copperplate engraving. Eichstatt, 1613. Approximate paper size 22 3/8 x 18 1/8 inches. Basil Besler's great botanical work is a landmark of botanical documentation and pre-Linnaean classification, as well as one of the most splendidly stylized and aesthetically powerful botanical works ever produced. Besler was an apothecary and botanist who managed the gardens of Bishop Johann Conrad in Eichstatt, Germany. The Bishop's remarkable garden was one of the most extensive in Europe, containing a huge variety of European shrubs and flowering plants, as well as exotic specimens from Asia and the Americas. Besler used this encyclopedicresource as the basis for the "Hortus Eystettensis," in which he studied and depicted over a thousand flowers, representing 667 species in all. With the Bishop's patronage, he worked both as artist and publisher, directing a team of ten artists and engravers in creating 374 plates over 16 years. Published one hundred and fifty years before Linnaeus created his thorough system of classification, Besler's great florilegium represents an impressive early attempt to classify plants for the benefit of botanists, doctors and apothecaries. Each plant is given a distinct and often descriptive Latin title, and related species are grouped together on the same plate, or over a series of plates. Almost all specimens are shown complete and accurately colored, including delineations of their root systems. While Besler's work is obviously motivated by a scientific impulse to document and describe a remarkable collection of species, the beautiful presentation and dramatic stylization of the illustrations also convey a sense of the visual grandeur of the Bishop's great garden. Each specimen is placed on the page with an artist's understanding of formal and spatial relations. Most notably, the stylized depiction of foliage and root systems betrays a lively baroque sensibility, as the plants seem to dance across the page.

      [Bookseller: Arader Galleries - Houston]
 13.   Check availability:     AbeBooks     Link/Print  


        Tussilago, Pl. 366

      Eichstatt 1613 - Basil Besler’s (1561-1629) great botanical work, “Hortus Eystettensis” is a landmark of botanical documentation and pre-Linnaean classification, as well as one of the most splendidly stylized and aesthetically powerful botanical works ever produced. This original hand-colored copperplate engraving, Tussilago, Pl. 366, measures 20.75" x 16" and is in good condition with staining throughout and wrinkling. Illustrated on this engraving are plants commonly known as Spring anemone, Golden Saxifrage, Pasqueflower, European wood anemone and Coltsfoot. This engraving is expertly hand-colored in rich shades of green on each of the flowers stems and leaves, all of which are individually portrayed and labeled within the plate. The flowers are vibrantly colored in white, purple and yellow and their root systems are also illustrated. Basil Besler was an apothecary and botanist who managed the gardens of Bishop Johann Conrad in Eichstatt, Germany. The Bishop’s remarkable garden was one of the most extensive in Europe, containing a huge variety of European shrubs and flowering plants, as well as exotic specimens from Asia and the Americas. Besler used this encyclopedic resource as the basis for the “Hortus Eystettensis”, in which he studied and depicted over a thousand flowers, representing 667 species in all. With the Bishop’s patronage, he worked both as artist and publisher, directing a team of ten artists and engravers in creating 367 plates over 16 years. Published one hundred and fifty years before Linnaeus created his thorough system of classification; Besler’s great florilegium represents an impressive early attempt to classify plants for the benefit of botanists, doctors and apothecaries. Each plant is given a distinct and often descriptive Latin title, and related species are grouped together on the same plate, or over a series of plates. Almost all specimens are shown complete and accurately colored, including delineations of their root systems. While Besler’s work is obviously motivated by a scientific impulse to document and describe a remarkable collection of species, the beautiful presentation and dramatic stylization of the illustrations also convey a sense of the visual grandeur of the Bishop’s great garden. Each specimen is placed on the page with an artist’s understanding of formal and spatial relations. Most notably, the stylized depiction of foliage and root systems betrays a lively baroque sensibility, as the plants seem to dance across the page. This illustration of various flowers is among the most dramatic and desirable of Besler’s illustrations.

      [Bookseller: Arader Galleries San Francisco]
 14.   Check availability:     AbeBooks     Link/Print  


        Poma flore multiplici [Double-flowered apple]; Lychris viscosa sylvestris flore incarnato [German catchfly]; Rapunculus Sylvestris maior [Spreading bellflower]

      Eichstatt 1613 - Basil Besler published "Hortus Eystettensis", the earliest large folio botanical, at Eichstatt near Nuremburg, in 1613. He worked on the drawings for the 374 copper engravings over a period of sixteen years using the plants in the garden of Bishop Johann Conrad von Gemmingen, his patron. Depicted in this florilegium were flowers, herbs, vegetables and newly discovered plants such as tobacco and peppers. Besler was, in modern terms, a botanist and horticulturalist, and he was familiar with real and alleged medicinal properties of various plants. Besler had the good fortune to live at a time when exotic plants were being shipped to Europe from all over the world. The garden that he organized and illustrated for his patron was both ornamental and experimental, and the large book he had engraved after his drawings was unique. The prints, made by a team of master engravers, are strong and exquisitely done. Hand-coloured engraving.

      [Bookseller: Donald A. Heald Rare Books (ABAA)]
 15.   Check availability:     AbeBooks     Link/Print  


        Tanacetum inodorum flore Belli dis maioris, Pl. 207

      Eichstatt, 1613 Basil Besler?s (1561-1629) great botanical work, ?Hortus Eystettensis? is a landmark of botanical documentation and pre-Linnaean classification, as well as one of the most splendidly stylized and aesthetically powerful botanical works ever produced.This original hand-colored copperplate engraving, Tanacetum inodorum flore Belli dis maioris, Pl. 207, measures 22.5" x 18.5" and is in very good condition with light staining throughout and evidence of verso page text. Illustrated on this engraving are plants commonly known as Cupid's-dart, Tansay and Common calendua. This engraving is expertly hand-colored with tall, elegant flowers reaching to the top of the plate. Their long stems and leaves are colored vibrantly in green with individual flowers in shades of purple, white, yellow and orange. Each of these flowers bear its own special characteristics and is expertly detailed.Basil Besler was an apothecary and botanist who managed the gardens of Bishop Johann Conrad in Eichstatt, Germany. The Bishop?s remarkable garden was one of the most extensive in Europe, containing a huge variety of European shrubs and flowering plants, as well as exotic specimens from Asia and the Americas. Besler used this encyclopedic resource as the basis for the ?Hortus Eystettensis?, in which he studied and depicted over a thousand flowers, representing 667 species in all.With the Bishop?s patronage, he worked both as artist and publisher, directing a team of ten artists and engravers in creating 367 plates over 16 years. Published one hundred and fifty years before Linnaeus created his thorough system of classification; Besler?s great florilegium represents an impressive early attempt to classify plants for the benefit of botanists, doctors and apothecaries.Each plant is given a distinct and often descriptive Latin title, and related species are grouped together on the same plate, or over a series of plates. Almost all specimens are shown complete and accurately colored, including delineations of their root systems. While Besler?s work is obviously motivated by a scientific impulse to document and describe a remarkable collection of species, the beautiful presentation and dramatic stylization of the illustrations also convey a sense of the visual grandeur of the Bishop?s great garden.Each specimen is placed on the page with an artist?s understanding of formal and spatial relations. Most notably, the stylized depiction of foliage and root systems betrays a lively baroque sensibility, as the plants seem to dance across the page. This illustration of various flowers is among the most dramatic and desirable of Besler?s illustrations.

      [Bookseller: Arader Galleries]
 16.   Check availability:     Biblio     Link/Print  


        Balsamina Foemina

      Eichstatt 1613 - 22 1/4" x 16 3/4" BESLER, Basil [1561-1629]. "Balsamina Foemina." A selection from "Hortus Eystettensis." Hand-colored copperplate engraving. Eichstatt, 1613. Approximate paper size 22 1/4 x 16 3/4 inches. Basil Besler's great botanical work is a landmark of botanical documentation and pre-Linnaean classification, as well as one of the most splendidly stylized and aesthetically powerful botanical works ever produced. Besler was an apothecary and botanist who managed the gardens of Bishop Johann Conrad in Eichstatt, Germany. The Bishop's remarkable garden was one of the most extensive in Europe, containing a huge variety of European shrubs and flowering plants, as well as exotic specimens from Asia and the Americas. Besler used this encyclopedicresource as the basis for the "Hortus Eystettensis," in which he studied and depicted over a thousand flowers, representing 667 species in all. With the Bishop's patronage, he worked both as artist and publisher, directing a team of ten artists and engravers in creating 374 plates over 16 years. Published one hundred and fifty years before Linnaeus created his thorough system of classification, Besler's great florilegium represents an impressive early attempt to classify plants for the benefit of botanists, doctors and apothecaries. Each plant is given a distinct and often descriptive Latin title, and related species are grouped together on the same plate, or over a series of plates. Almost all specimens are shown complete and accurately colored, including delineations of their root systems. While Besler's work is obviously motivated by a scientific impulse to document and describe a remarkable collection of species, the beautiful presentation and dramatic stylization of the illustrations also convey a sense of the visual grandeur of the Bishop's great garden. Each specimen is placed on the page with an artist's understanding of formal and spatial relations. Most notably, the stylized depiction of foliage and root systems betrays a lively baroque sensibility, as the plants seem to dance across the page.

      [Bookseller: Arader Galleries - Houston]
 17.   Check availability:     AbeBooks     Link/Print  


        Sambucus arborrosea (snowball bush, Guilder rose, European cranberry bush)

      1613 - Basil Besler (1561-1629) From Hortus Eystettensis Eichstatt: 1613 Hand-colored copperplate engraving (later color) Sheet size: 22 1/2" x 17 1/2" Basil Besler’s great botanical work is a landmark of botanical documentation and pre-Linnaean classification, as well as one of the most splendidly stylized and aesthetically powerful botanical works ever produced. Besler was an apothecary and botanist who managed the gardens of Bishop Johann Conrad in Eichstatt, Germany. The Bishop’s remarkable garden was one of the most extensive in Europe, containing a huge variety of European shrubs and flowering plants, as well as exotic specimens from Asia and the Americas. Besler used this encyclopedic resource as the basis for the Hortus Eystettensis, in which he studied and depicted over a thousand flowers, representing 667 species in all. With the Bishop’s patronage, he worked both as artist and publisher, directing a team of ten artists and engravers in creating 367 plates over 16 years. Published one hundred and fifty years before Linnaeus created his thorough system of classification, Besler’s great florilegium represents an impressive early attempt to classify plants for the benefit of botanists, doctors and apothecaries. Each plant is given a distinct and often descriptive Latin title, and related species are grouped together on the same plate, or over a series of plates. Almost all specimens are shown complete and accurately colored, including delineations of their root systems. While Besler’s work is obviously motivated by a scientific impulse to document and describe a remarkable collection of species, the beautiful presentation and dramatic stylization of the illustrations also convey a sense of the visual grandeur of the Bishop’s great garden. Each specimen is placed on the page with an artist’s understanding of formal and spatial relations. Most notably, the stylized depiction of foliage and root systems betrays a lively baroque sensibility, as the plants seem to dance across the page. These illustrations of various flowers are among the most dramatic and desirable of Besler’s illustrations. Each is in excellent condition, and would represent wonderful additions to any collection of European botanical art.

      [Bookseller: Arader Galleries San Francisco]
 18.   Check availability:     AbeBooks     Link/Print  


        Leucoium flore albo pleno, Pl. 168

      Eichstatt 1613 - Basil Besler’s (1561-1629) great botanical work, “Hortus Eystettensis” is a landmark of botanical documentation and pre-Linnaean classification, as well as one of the most splendidly stylized and aesthetically powerful botanical works ever produced. This original hand-colored copperplate engraving, Leucoium flore albo pleno, Pl. 168, measures 22.25" x 17.75" and is in excellent condition with light staining and faint evidence of verso page text. Illustrated on this engraving are flowers commonly known as Double-flowered yellow wallflower and Double-flowered wall stock. Expertly hand-colored, the large stems of these flowers are rich green, with full leaves and flowers in shades of yellow, orange and white. Also illustrated, adding a scientific touch to the already aesthetically pleasing engraving are parts of the root systems of the flowers. Precise lines define and detail the flowers, shading and highlighting them and giving dimension. Basil Besler was an apothecary and botanist who managed the gardens of Bishop Johann Conrad in Eichstatt, Germany . The Bishop’s remarkable garden was one of the most extensive in Europe, containing a huge variety of European shrubs and flowering plants, as well as exotic specimens from Asia and the Americas . Besler used this encyclopedic resource as the basis for the “Hortus Eystettensis”, in which he studied and depicted over a thousand flowers, representing 667 species in all. With the Bishop’s patronage, he worked both as artist and publisher, directing a team of ten artists and engravers in creating 367 plates over 16 years. Published one hundred and fifty years before Linnaeus created his thorough system of classification; Besler’s great florilegium represents an impressive early attempt to classify plants for the benefit of botanists, doctors and apothecaries. Each plant is given a distinct and often descriptive Latin title, and related species are grouped together on the same plate, or over a series of plates. Almost all specimens are shown complete and accurately colored, including delineations of their root systems. While Besler’s work is obviously motivated by a scientific impulse to document and describe a remarkable collection of species, the beautiful presentation and dramatic stylization of the illustrations also convey a sense of the visual grandeur of the Bishop’s great garden. Each specimen is placed on the page with an artist’s understanding of formal and spatial relations. Most notably, the stylized depiction of foliage and root systems betrays a lively baroque sensibility, as the plants seem to dance across the page. This illustration of various flowers is among the most dramatic and desirable of Besler’s illustrations.

      [Bookseller: Arader Galleries San Francisco]
 19.   Check availability:     AbeBooks     Link/Print  

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