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Displayed below are some selected recent viaLibri matches for books published in 1613

        Althaea Thuringiaca, PL. 220

      Eichstatt, 1613 Basil Besler’s (1561-1629) great botanical work, “Hortus Eystettensis” is a landmark of botanical documentation and pre-Linnaean classification, as well as one of the most splendidly stylized and aesthetically powerful botanical works ever produced. This original hand-colored copperplate engraving, Althaea Thuringiaca, PL. 220, measures 22" x 16.5" and is in good condition with staining throughout and evidence of verso page text. Illustrated on this engraving are plants commonly known as Kenilworth Ivy, Thuringian Willow Tree and Traveler's Joy. This engraving is expertly hand-colored with rich shades of green on the leaves and stems and vibrant blue, pink and crimson flowers.Basil Besler was an apothecary and botanist who managed the gardens of Bishop Johann Conrad in Eichstatt, Germany. The Bishop’s remarkable garden was one of the most extensive in Europe, containing a huge variety of European shrubs and flowering plants, as well as exotic specimens from Asia and the Americas. Besler used this encyclopedic resource as the basis for the “Hortus Eystettensis”, in which he studied and depicted over a thousand flowers, representing 667 species in all. With the Bishop’s patronage, he worked both as artist and publisher, directing a team of ten artists and engravers in creating 367 plates over 16 years.Published one hundred and fifty years before Linnaeus created his thorough system of classification; Besler’s great florilegium represents an impressive early attempt to classify plants for the benefit of botanists, doctors and apothecaries. Each plant is given a distinct and often descriptive Latin title, and related species are grouped together on the same plate, or over a series of plates. Almost all specimens are shown complete and accurately colored, including delineations of their root systems.While Besler’s work is obviously motivated by a scientific impulse to document and describe a remarkable collection of species, the beautiful presentation and dramatic stylization of the illustrations also convey a sense of the visual grandeur of the Bishop’s great garden. Each specimen is placed on the page with an artist’s understanding of formal and spatial relations. Most notably, the stylized depiction of foliage and root systems betrays a lively baroque sensibility, as the plants seem to dance across the page. This illustration of various flowers is among the most dramatic and desirable of Besler’s illustrations.

      [Bookseller: Arader Galleries]
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        Iris latifolia violaceo colore maior; Iris latifolia vulgaris coerulea; Iris latifolia maior variegata [Tall bearded garden irises (flag irises)]

      Eichstatt 1613 - Basil Besler published "Hortus Eystettensis", the earliest large folio botanical, at Eichstatt near Nuremburg, in 1613. He worked on the drawings for the 374 copper engravings over a period of sixteen years using the plants in the garden of Bishop Johann Conrad von Gemmingen, his patron. Depicted in this florilegium were flowers, herbs, vegetables and newly discovered plants such as tobacco and peppers. Besler was, in modern terms, a botanist and horticulturalist, and he was familiar with real and alleged medicinal properties of various plants. Besler had the good fortune to live at a time when exotic plants were being shipped to Europe from all over the world. The garden that he organized and illustrated for his patron was both ornamental and experimental, and the large book he had engraved after his drawings was unique. The prints, made by a team of master engravers, are strong and exquisitely done. Hand-coloured engraving.

      [Bookseller: Donald A. Heald Rare Books (ABAA)]
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        Latininum flor lut., Pl. 275

      Eichstatt 1613 - Basil Besler’s (1561-1629) great botanical work, “Hortus Eystettensis” is a landmark of botanical documentation and pre-Linnaean classification, as well as one of the most splendidly stylized and aesthetically powerful botanical works ever produced. This original hand-colored copperplate engraving, Ranunculus Latininum flor lut., Pl. 275, measures 22.5" x 18.25" and is excellent condition. Illustrated on this engraving are flowering plants commonly known as Fragrant jasmine, Acanthus and white jasmine. The acanthus, with its large and finely detailed green leaves and white and pink flowers is centrally located and fills the page. The two types of jasmine rest on either side and are also superbly colored with green stems and leaves and white and yellow flowers. Basil Besler was an apothecary and botanist who managed the gardens of Bishop Johann Conrad in Eichstatt, Germany. The Bishop’s remarkable garden was one of the most extensive in Europe, containing a huge variety of European shrubs and flowering plants, as well as exotic specimens from Asia and the Americas. Besler used this encyclopedic resource as the basis for the “Hortus Eystettensis”, in which he studied and depicted over a thousand flowers, representing 667 species in all. With the Bishop’s patronage, he worked both as artist and publisher, directing a team of ten artists and engravers in creating 367 plates over 16 years. Published one hundred and fifty years before Linnaeus created his thorough system of classification; Besler’s great florilegium represents an impressive early attempt to classify plants for the benefit of botanists, doctors and apothecaries. Each plant is given a distinct and often descriptive Latin title, and related species are grouped together on the same plate, or over a series of plates. Almost all specimens are shown complete and accurately colored, including delineations of their root systems. While Besler’s work is obviously motivated by a scientific impulse to document and describe a remarkable collection of species, the beautiful presentation and dramatic stylization of the illustrations also convey a sense of the visual grandeur of the Bishop’s great garden. Each specimen is placed on the page with an artist’s understanding of formal and spatial relations. Most notably, the stylized depiction of foliage and root systems betrays a lively baroque sensibility, as the plants seem to dance across the page. This illustration of various flowers is among the most dramatic and desirable of Besler’s illustrations.

      [Bookseller: Arader Galleries San Francisco]
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        Caryophyll Plenussaete Rubescens

      Eichstatt 1613 - 22 3/8" x 18 1/8" BESLER, Basil [1561-1629]. "Caryophyll Plenussaete Rubescens." A selection from "Hortus Eystettensis." Hand-colored copperplate engraving. Eichstatt, 1613. Approximate paper size 22 3/8 x 18 1/8 inches. Basil Besler's great botanical work is a landmark of botanical documentation and pre-Linnaean classification, as well as one of the most splendidly stylized and aesthetically powerful botanical works ever produced. Besler was an apothecary and botanist who managed the gardens of Bishop Johann Conrad in Eichstatt, Germany. The Bishop's remarkable garden was one of the most extensive in Europe, containing a huge variety of European shrubs and flowering plants, as well as exotic specimens from Asia and the Americas. Besler used this encyclopedicresource as the basis for the "Hortus Eystettensis," in which he studied and depicted over a thousand flowers, representing 667 species in all. With the Bishop's patronage, he worked both as artist and publisher, directing a team of ten artists and engravers in creating 374 plates over 16 years. Published one hundred and fifty years before Linnaeus created his thorough system of classification, Besler's great florilegium represents an impressive early attempt to classify plants for the benefit of botanists, doctors and apothecaries. Each plant is given a distinct and often descriptive Latin title, and related species are grouped together on the same plate, or over a series of plates. Almost all specimens are shown complete and accurately colored, including delineations of their root systems. While Besler's work is obviously motivated by a scientific impulse to document and describe a remarkable collection of species, the beautiful presentation and dramatic stylization of the illustrations also convey a sense of the visual grandeur of the Bishop's great garden. Each specimen is placed on the page with an artist's understanding of formal and spatial relations. Most notably, the stylized depiction of foliage and root systems betrays a lively baroque sensibility, as the plants seem to dance across the page.

      [Bookseller: Arader Galleries - Houston]
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        Melocactos, Pl. 254

      Eichstatt 1613 - Basil Besler’s (1561-1629) great botanical work, “Hortus Eystettensis” is a landmark of botanical documentation and pre-Linnaean classification, as well as one of the most splendidly stylized and aesthetically powerful botanical works ever produced. This original hand-colored copperplate engraving, Melocactos, Pl. 254, measures 22.25" x 18" and is in excellent condition with light foxing and evidence of verso page text. Illustrated on this engraving are flowers commonly known as Pink Maltese cross, Scarlet Maltese cross and White Maltese cross. Expertly hand-colored, these herbaceous perennial plants are different shapes and colored in greens and browns, with purple, cacti-like buds on the center plant. Maltese cross plants are commonly used in gardens as decoration and were sown in Monticello by Thomas Jefferson in 1807. Basil Besler was an apothecary and botanist who managed the gardens of Bishop Johann Conrad in Eichstatt, Germany . The Bishop’s remarkable garden was one of the most extensive in Europe, containing a huge variety of European shrubs and flowering plants, as well as exotic specimens from Asia and the Americas . Besler used this encyclopedic resource as the basis for the “Hortus Eystettensis”, in which he studied and depicted over a thousand flowers, representing 667 species in all. With the Bishop’s patronage, he worked both as artist and publisher, directing a team of ten artists and engravers in creating 367 plates over 16 years. Published one hundred and fifty years before Linnaeus created his thorough system of classification; Besler’s great florilegium represents an impressive early attempt to classify plants for the benefit of botanists, doctors and apothecaries. Each plant is given a distinct and often descriptive Latin title, and related species are grouped together on the same plate, or over a series of plates. Almost all specimens are shown complete and accurately colored, including delineations of their root systems. While Besler’s work is obviously motivated by a scientific impulse to document and describe a remarkable collection of species, the beautiful presentation and dramatic stylization of the illustrations also convey a sense of the visual grandeur of the Bishop’s great garden. Each specimen is placed on the page with an artist’s understanding of formal and spatial relations. Most notably, the stylized depiction of foliage and root systems betrays a lively baroque sensibility, as the plants seem to dance across the page. This illustration of various flowers is among the most dramatic and desirable of Besler’s illustrations.

      [Bookseller: Arader Galleries San Francisco]
 5.   Check availability:     AbeBooks     Link/Print  


        Mentastrum Niveum Angelicum

      Eichstatt 1613 - 22 3/8" x 18 1/8" BESLER, Basil [1561-1629]. "Mentastrum Niveum Angelicum." A selection from "Hortus Eystettensis." Hand-colored copperplate engraving. Eichstatt, 1613. Approximate paper size 22 3/8 x 18 1/8 inches. Basil Besler's great botanical work is a landmark of botanical documentation and pre-Linnaean classification, as well as one of the most splendidly stylized and aesthetically powerful botanical works ever produced. Besler was an apothecary and botanist who managed the gardens of Bishop Johann Conrad in Eichstatt, Germany. The Bishop's remarkable garden was one of the most extensive in Europe, containing a huge variety of European shrubs and flowering plants, as well as exotic specimens from Asia and the Americas. Besler used this encyclopedicresource as the basis for the "Hortus Eystettensis," in which he studied and depicted over a thousand flowers, representing 667 species in all. With the Bishop's patronage, he worked both as artist and publisher, directing a team of ten artists and engravers in creating 374 plates over 16 years. Published one hundred and fifty years before Linnaeus created his thorough system of classification, Besler's great florilegium represents an impressive early attempt to classify plants for the benefit of botanists, doctors and apothecaries. Each plant is given a distinct and often descriptive Latin title, and related species are grouped together on the same plate, or over a series of plates. Almost all specimens are shown complete and accurately colored, including delineations of their root systems. While Besler's work is obviously motivated by a scientific impulse to document and describe a remarkable collection of species, the beautiful presentation and dramatic stylization of the illustrations also convey a sense of the visual grandeur of the Bishop's great garden. Each specimen is placed on the page with an artist's understanding of formal and spatial relations. Most notably, the stylized depiction of foliage and root systems betrays a lively baroque sensibility, as the plants seem to dance across the page.

      [Bookseller: Arader Galleries - Houston]
 6.   Check availability:     AbeBooks     Link/Print  


        Tussilago, Pl. 366

      Eichstatt 1613 - Basil Besler’s (1561-1629) great botanical work, “Hortus Eystettensis” is a landmark of botanical documentation and pre-Linnaean classification, as well as one of the most splendidly stylized and aesthetically powerful botanical works ever produced. This original hand-colored copperplate engraving, Tussilago, Pl. 366, measures 20.75" x 16" and is in good condition with staining throughout and wrinkling. Illustrated on this engraving are plants commonly known as Spring anemone, Golden Saxifrage, Pasqueflower, European wood anemone and Coltsfoot. This engraving is expertly hand-colored in rich shades of green on each of the flowers stems and leaves, all of which are individually portrayed and labeled within the plate. The flowers are vibrantly colored in white, purple and yellow and their root systems are also illustrated. Basil Besler was an apothecary and botanist who managed the gardens of Bishop Johann Conrad in Eichstatt, Germany. The Bishop’s remarkable garden was one of the most extensive in Europe, containing a huge variety of European shrubs and flowering plants, as well as exotic specimens from Asia and the Americas. Besler used this encyclopedic resource as the basis for the “Hortus Eystettensis”, in which he studied and depicted over a thousand flowers, representing 667 species in all. With the Bishop’s patronage, he worked both as artist and publisher, directing a team of ten artists and engravers in creating 367 plates over 16 years. Published one hundred and fifty years before Linnaeus created his thorough system of classification; Besler’s great florilegium represents an impressive early attempt to classify plants for the benefit of botanists, doctors and apothecaries. Each plant is given a distinct and often descriptive Latin title, and related species are grouped together on the same plate, or over a series of plates. Almost all specimens are shown complete and accurately colored, including delineations of their root systems. While Besler’s work is obviously motivated by a scientific impulse to document and describe a remarkable collection of species, the beautiful presentation and dramatic stylization of the illustrations also convey a sense of the visual grandeur of the Bishop’s great garden. Each specimen is placed on the page with an artist’s understanding of formal and spatial relations. Most notably, the stylized depiction of foliage and root systems betrays a lively baroque sensibility, as the plants seem to dance across the page. This illustration of various flowers is among the most dramatic and desirable of Besler’s illustrations.

      [Bookseller: Arader Galleries San Francisco]
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        Poma flore multiplici [Double-flowered apple]; Lychris viscosa sylvestris flore incarnato [German catchfly]; Rapunculus Sylvestris maior [Spreading bellflower]

      Eichstatt 1613 - Basil Besler published "Hortus Eystettensis", the earliest large folio botanical, at Eichstatt near Nuremburg, in 1613. He worked on the drawings for the 374 copper engravings over a period of sixteen years using the plants in the garden of Bishop Johann Conrad von Gemmingen, his patron. Depicted in this florilegium were flowers, herbs, vegetables and newly discovered plants such as tobacco and peppers. Besler was, in modern terms, a botanist and horticulturalist, and he was familiar with real and alleged medicinal properties of various plants. Besler had the good fortune to live at a time when exotic plants were being shipped to Europe from all over the world. The garden that he organized and illustrated for his patron was both ornamental and experimental, and the large book he had engraved after his drawings was unique. The prints, made by a team of master engravers, are strong and exquisitely done. Hand-coloured engraving.

      [Bookseller: Donald A. Heald Rare Books (ABAA)]
 8.   Check availability:     AbeBooks     Link/Print  


        Tanacetum inodorum flore Belli dis maioris, Pl. 207

      Eichstatt, 1613 Basil Besler?s (1561-1629) great botanical work, ?Hortus Eystettensis? is a landmark of botanical documentation and pre-Linnaean classification, as well as one of the most splendidly stylized and aesthetically powerful botanical works ever produced.This original hand-colored copperplate engraving, Tanacetum inodorum flore Belli dis maioris, Pl. 207, measures 22.5" x 18.5" and is in very good condition with light staining throughout and evidence of verso page text. Illustrated on this engraving are plants commonly known as Cupid's-dart, Tansay and Common calendua. This engraving is expertly hand-colored with tall, elegant flowers reaching to the top of the plate. Their long stems and leaves are colored vibrantly in green with individual flowers in shades of purple, white, yellow and orange. Each of these flowers bear its own special characteristics and is expertly detailed.Basil Besler was an apothecary and botanist who managed the gardens of Bishop Johann Conrad in Eichstatt, Germany. The Bishop?s remarkable garden was one of the most extensive in Europe, containing a huge variety of European shrubs and flowering plants, as well as exotic specimens from Asia and the Americas. Besler used this encyclopedic resource as the basis for the ?Hortus Eystettensis?, in which he studied and depicted over a thousand flowers, representing 667 species in all.With the Bishop?s patronage, he worked both as artist and publisher, directing a team of ten artists and engravers in creating 367 plates over 16 years. Published one hundred and fifty years before Linnaeus created his thorough system of classification; Besler?s great florilegium represents an impressive early attempt to classify plants for the benefit of botanists, doctors and apothecaries.Each plant is given a distinct and often descriptive Latin title, and related species are grouped together on the same plate, or over a series of plates. Almost all specimens are shown complete and accurately colored, including delineations of their root systems. While Besler?s work is obviously motivated by a scientific impulse to document and describe a remarkable collection of species, the beautiful presentation and dramatic stylization of the illustrations also convey a sense of the visual grandeur of the Bishop?s great garden.Each specimen is placed on the page with an artist?s understanding of formal and spatial relations. Most notably, the stylized depiction of foliage and root systems betrays a lively baroque sensibility, as the plants seem to dance across the page. This illustration of various flowers is among the most dramatic and desirable of Besler?s illustrations.

      [Bookseller: Arader Galleries]
 9.   Check availability:     Biblio     Link/Print  


        Balsamina Foemina

      Eichstatt 1613 - 22 1/4" x 16 3/4" BESLER, Basil [1561-1629]. "Balsamina Foemina." A selection from "Hortus Eystettensis." Hand-colored copperplate engraving. Eichstatt, 1613. Approximate paper size 22 1/4 x 16 3/4 inches. Basil Besler's great botanical work is a landmark of botanical documentation and pre-Linnaean classification, as well as one of the most splendidly stylized and aesthetically powerful botanical works ever produced. Besler was an apothecary and botanist who managed the gardens of Bishop Johann Conrad in Eichstatt, Germany. The Bishop's remarkable garden was one of the most extensive in Europe, containing a huge variety of European shrubs and flowering plants, as well as exotic specimens from Asia and the Americas. Besler used this encyclopedicresource as the basis for the "Hortus Eystettensis," in which he studied and depicted over a thousand flowers, representing 667 species in all. With the Bishop's patronage, he worked both as artist and publisher, directing a team of ten artists and engravers in creating 374 plates over 16 years. Published one hundred and fifty years before Linnaeus created his thorough system of classification, Besler's great florilegium represents an impressive early attempt to classify plants for the benefit of botanists, doctors and apothecaries. Each plant is given a distinct and often descriptive Latin title, and related species are grouped together on the same plate, or over a series of plates. Almost all specimens are shown complete and accurately colored, including delineations of their root systems. While Besler's work is obviously motivated by a scientific impulse to document and describe a remarkable collection of species, the beautiful presentation and dramatic stylization of the illustrations also convey a sense of the visual grandeur of the Bishop's great garden. Each specimen is placed on the page with an artist's understanding of formal and spatial relations. Most notably, the stylized depiction of foliage and root systems betrays a lively baroque sensibility, as the plants seem to dance across the page.

      [Bookseller: Arader Galleries - Houston]
 10.   Check availability:     AbeBooks     Link/Print  


        Sambucus arborrosea (snowball bush, Guilder rose, European cranberry bush)

      1613 - Basil Besler (1561-1629) From Hortus Eystettensis Eichstatt: 1613 Hand-colored copperplate engraving (later color) Sheet size: 22 1/2" x 17 1/2" Basil Besler’s great botanical work is a landmark of botanical documentation and pre-Linnaean classification, as well as one of the most splendidly stylized and aesthetically powerful botanical works ever produced. Besler was an apothecary and botanist who managed the gardens of Bishop Johann Conrad in Eichstatt, Germany. The Bishop’s remarkable garden was one of the most extensive in Europe, containing a huge variety of European shrubs and flowering plants, as well as exotic specimens from Asia and the Americas. Besler used this encyclopedic resource as the basis for the Hortus Eystettensis, in which he studied and depicted over a thousand flowers, representing 667 species in all. With the Bishop’s patronage, he worked both as artist and publisher, directing a team of ten artists and engravers in creating 367 plates over 16 years. Published one hundred and fifty years before Linnaeus created his thorough system of classification, Besler’s great florilegium represents an impressive early attempt to classify plants for the benefit of botanists, doctors and apothecaries. Each plant is given a distinct and often descriptive Latin title, and related species are grouped together on the same plate, or over a series of plates. Almost all specimens are shown complete and accurately colored, including delineations of their root systems. While Besler’s work is obviously motivated by a scientific impulse to document and describe a remarkable collection of species, the beautiful presentation and dramatic stylization of the illustrations also convey a sense of the visual grandeur of the Bishop’s great garden. Each specimen is placed on the page with an artist’s understanding of formal and spatial relations. Most notably, the stylized depiction of foliage and root systems betrays a lively baroque sensibility, as the plants seem to dance across the page. These illustrations of various flowers are among the most dramatic and desirable of Besler’s illustrations. Each is in excellent condition, and would represent wonderful additions to any collection of European botanical art.

      [Bookseller: Arader Galleries San Francisco]
 11.   Check availability:     AbeBooks     Link/Print  


        Leucoium flore albo pleno, Pl. 168

      Eichstatt 1613 - Basil Besler’s (1561-1629) great botanical work, “Hortus Eystettensis” is a landmark of botanical documentation and pre-Linnaean classification, as well as one of the most splendidly stylized and aesthetically powerful botanical works ever produced. This original hand-colored copperplate engraving, Leucoium flore albo pleno, Pl. 168, measures 22.25" x 17.75" and is in excellent condition with light staining and faint evidence of verso page text. Illustrated on this engraving are flowers commonly known as Double-flowered yellow wallflower and Double-flowered wall stock. Expertly hand-colored, the large stems of these flowers are rich green, with full leaves and flowers in shades of yellow, orange and white. Also illustrated, adding a scientific touch to the already aesthetically pleasing engraving are parts of the root systems of the flowers. Precise lines define and detail the flowers, shading and highlighting them and giving dimension. Basil Besler was an apothecary and botanist who managed the gardens of Bishop Johann Conrad in Eichstatt, Germany . The Bishop’s remarkable garden was one of the most extensive in Europe, containing a huge variety of European shrubs and flowering plants, as well as exotic specimens from Asia and the Americas . Besler used this encyclopedic resource as the basis for the “Hortus Eystettensis”, in which he studied and depicted over a thousand flowers, representing 667 species in all. With the Bishop’s patronage, he worked both as artist and publisher, directing a team of ten artists and engravers in creating 367 plates over 16 years. Published one hundred and fifty years before Linnaeus created his thorough system of classification; Besler’s great florilegium represents an impressive early attempt to classify plants for the benefit of botanists, doctors and apothecaries. Each plant is given a distinct and often descriptive Latin title, and related species are grouped together on the same plate, or over a series of plates. Almost all specimens are shown complete and accurately colored, including delineations of their root systems. While Besler’s work is obviously motivated by a scientific impulse to document and describe a remarkable collection of species, the beautiful presentation and dramatic stylization of the illustrations also convey a sense of the visual grandeur of the Bishop’s great garden. Each specimen is placed on the page with an artist’s understanding of formal and spatial relations. Most notably, the stylized depiction of foliage and root systems betrays a lively baroque sensibility, as the plants seem to dance across the page. This illustration of various flowers is among the most dramatic and desirable of Besler’s illustrations.

      [Bookseller: Arader Galleries San Francisco]
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        Ribes minor fructu rubro [Alpine currant]; Ribes vulgaris fructu rubro [Common currant]; Ribes fructu nigro [Black currant]; Ribes maior fructu rubro [Red currant]; Ribest fructu albo [White Currant]

      Eichstatt 1613 - Basil Besler published "Hortus Eystettensis", the earliest large folio botanical, at Eichstatt near Nuremburg, in 1613. He worked on the drawings for the 374 copper engravings over a period of sixteen years using the plants in the garden of Bishop Johann Conrad von Gemmingen, his patron. Depicted in this florilegium were flowers, herbs, vegetables and newly discovered plants such as tobacco and peppers. Besler was, in modern terms, a botanist and horticulturalist, and he was familiar with real and alleged medicinal properties of various plants. Besler had the good fortune to live at a time when exotic plants were being shipped to Europe from all over the world. The garden that he organized and illustrated for his patron was both ornamental and experimental, and the large book he had engraved after his drawings was unique. The prints, made by a team of master engravers, are strong and exquisitely done. Hand-coloured engraving.

      [Bookseller: Donald A. Heald Rare Books (ABAA)]
 13.   Check availability:     AbeBooks     Link/Print  


        Piper Indicum Cordatum

      Eichstatt 1613 - 21 1/8" x 16 3/8" BESLER, Basil [1561-1629]. "Piper Indicum Cordatum." A selection from "Hortus Eystettensis." Hand-colored copperplate engraving. Eichstatt, 1613. Approximate paper size 21 1/8 x 16 3/8 inches. Basil Besler's great botanical work is a landmark of botanical documentation and pre-Linnaean classification, as well as one of the most splendidly stylized and aesthetically powerful botanical works ever produced. Besler was an apothecary and botanist who managed the gardens of Bishop Johann Conrad in Eichstatt, Germany. The Bishop's remarkable garden was one of the most extensive in Europe, containing a huge variety of European shrubs and flowering plants, as well as exotic specimens from Asia and the Americas. Besler used this encyclopedicresource as the basis for the "Hortus Eystettensis," in which he studied and depicted over a thousand flowers, representing 667 species in all. With the Bishop's patronage, he worked both as artist and publisher, directing a team of ten artists and engravers in creating 374 plates over 16 years. Published one hundred and fifty years before Linnaeus created his thorough system of classification, Besler's great florilegium represents an impressive early attempt to classify plants for the benefit of botanists, doctors and apothecaries. Each plant is given a distinct and often descriptive Latin title, and related species are grouped together on the same plate, or over a series of plates. Almost all specimens are shown complete and accurately colored, including delineations of their root systems. While Besler's work is obviously motivated by a scientific impulse to document and describe a remarkable collection of species, the beautiful presentation and dramatic stylization of the illustrations also convey a sense of the visual grandeur of the Bishop's great garden. Each specimen is placed on the page with an artist's understanding of formal and spatial relations. Most notably, the stylized depiction of foliage and root systems betrays a lively baroque sensibility, as the plants seem to dance across the page.

      [Bookseller: Arader Galleries - Houston]
 14.   Check availability:     AbeBooks     Link/Print  


        Melocactos [Mother-in-law's Cushion]; Rosa Hiericontea aperta [Rose of Jericho, unfolded]; Rosa Hiericontea conclusa [Rose of Jericho, folded]

      Eichstatt 1613 - Basil Besler published "Hortus Eystettensis", the earliest large folio botanical, at Eichstatt near Nuremburg, in 1613. He worked on the drawings for the 374 copper engravings over a period of sixteen years using the plants in the garden of Bishop Johann Conrad von Gemmingen, his patron. Depicted in this florilegium were flowers, herbs, vegetables and newly discovered plants such as tobacco and peppers. Besler was, in modern terms, a botanist and horticulturalist, and he was familiar with real and alleged medicinal properties of various plants. Besler had the good fortune to live at a time when exotic plants were being shipped to Europe from all over the world. The garden that he organized and illustrated for his patron was both ornamental and experimental, and the large book he had engraved after his drawings was unique. The prints, made by a team of master engravers, are strong and exquisitely done. Engraving. Very good condition apart from a few natural paper creases, a small loss in the top right corner of the sheet, and two tiny orange spots in the left side of the image. Slight offsetting.

      [Bookseller: Donald A. Heald Rare Books (ABAA)]
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        Ericaminor flore albo, Pl. 252

      Eichstatt 1613 - Basil Besler’s (1561-1629) great botanical work, “Hortus Eystettensis” is a landmark of botanical documentation and pre-Linnaean classification, as well as one of the most splendidly stylized and aesthetically powerful botanical works ever produced. This original hand-colored copperplate engraving, Ericaminor flore albo, Pl. 252, measures 22.25" x 18" and is in excellent condition with light staining, evidence of verso page text and evidence of previous repair to the right edge. Illustrated on this engraving are flowers commonly known as White Italian bugloss, Garden bugloss and Blue Italian bugloss, al from the Borage family of "Forget-Me-Not" flowers. This engraving is expertly hand-colored with rich greeen coloring the long stems of the Italian bugloss' and brown coloring for the small, garden bugloss. The larger flowers of the Italian bugloss are finely colored in white and red and are illustrated in different stages of blooming. The smaller Garden bugloss and illustrated with delicate white flowers. Precise lines define and detail the flowers, shading and highlighting them and giving dimension. Basil Besler was an apothecary and botanist who managed the gardens of Bishop Johann Conrad in Eichstatt, Germany . The Bishop’s remarkable garden was one of the most extensive in Europe, containing a huge variety of European shrubs and flowering plants, as well as exotic specimens from Asia and the Americas . Besler used this encyclopedic resource as the basis for the “Hortus Eystettensis”, in which he studied and depicted over a thousand flowers, representing 667 species in all. With the Bishop’s patronage, he worked both as artist and publisher, directing a team of ten artists and engravers in creating 367 plates over 16 years. Published one hundred and fifty years before Linnaeus created his thorough system of classification; Besler’s great florilegium represents an impressive early attempt to classify plants for the benefit of botanists, doctors and apothecaries. Each plant is given a distinct and often descriptive Latin title, and related species are grouped together on the same plate, or over a series of plates. Almost all specimens are shown complete and accurately colored, including delineations of their root systems. While Besler’s work is obviously motivated by a scientific impulse to document and describe a remarkable collection of species, the beautiful presentation and dramatic stylization of the illustrations also convey a sense of the visual grandeur of the Bishop’s great garden. Each specimen is placed on the page with an artist’s understanding of formal and spatial relations. Most notably, the stylized depiction of foliage and root systems betrays a lively baroque sensibility, as the plants seem to dance across the page. This illustration of various flowers is among the most dramatic and desirable of Besler’s illustrations.

      [Bookseller: Arader Galleries San Francisco]
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