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Displayed below are some selected recent viaLibri matches for books published in 1495

        S. THOMAE AQUINATE IN QUATUOR LIBROS ARISTOTELIS DE COELO, & MUNDO COMMENTARIA. Quae, cum morte praeventus perficere non potuerit, absolvit Petrus de Alvernia: Cum duplici textus tralatione, Antiqua uidelicet, & Io. Argyropoli nova, diligenter recognitis, quae omnia nuper sunt maxima diligentia castigata...

      In - 4 p. (mm. 304x205), mz. pergam. con ang. settecentesca, 6 cc.nn., 79 cc. num., marca tipografica al frontesp. e al fine, ornato da grandi iniziali figur. a vignetta, con alc. figg. nel t., tutto inc. su legno. S. Tommaso riusci' a commentare solo i primi 3 libri di Aristotele; il quarto fu continuato da Pietro di Alvernia. Cfr. Graesse,VII,141 che cita un'ediz. del 1495 - Adams,I,1459 per un'ediz. di Scoto, 1575. Frontesp. arross. e ben restaur. per manc. (sono state trascritte tre lettere del titolo); ultima carta con antico restauro al verso che copre alc. parole del t.; qualche alone, ma certamente un buon esemplare.

      [Bookseller: Libreria Antiquaria Malavasi]
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        Sermones sancti Augustine de tempore. Tle. 6-7 (v. 7) in 1 Bd. (cpl.).

      Basel, Johann Amerbach 1495.. 4°. 256 Bll., 44 nn.Bll. Mit grossem Textholzschnitt auf dem Titel von Teil 6 verso Albrecht Dürer zugeschrieben. Blindgepr. Schweinslederbd. über Holzdeckeln aud 3 Bünden (Rücken mit ergänzter Fehlstelle, Deckel etwas fleckig, berieben und bestossen, Schliessen fehlen)., fester Einband. Basler Inkunabel mit Holzschnitt, der dem jungen Albrecht Dürer zugewiesen wird. Teile 6-7 (cplt.) der ersten Gesamtausgabe von Augustinus Predigten. - Zweispaltiger 52-zeiliger Druck in gotischer Type. - Der schöne Holzschnitt zeigt den Kirchenvater im Gebet it dem Herausgeber, dem Friesen Augustin Ddodo. Der Holzschnitt wird von Susan V. Lenkey (GJB 1969, S. 212ff.) dem jungen Dürer zugewiesen. - Die ersten 2 und die letzten 8 Bll. aussen angerändert, leicht gebräunt, stellenweise etwas fleckig und mit vereinzelten Wurmspuren. Einige handschr. Marginalien. Gegen Ende mit leichten Feuchtigkeitsspuren. Innendeckel leimschattig. - Hain 2008. Schreiber 3395. Schramm XXI, 27. Pellechet 1518. Polain 408. Proctor 7605. BMC III, 756. GW 2920. Graff A 1308. Walsh 1187. BSB A-892. Bankverbindung in Deutschland vorhanden.

      [Bookseller: Buch + Kunst + hommagerie Sabine Koitka]
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        Disputatio ... [con]tra perfidia[m] Judeo[rum]/Pulcherrime questiones Judaica[m] p[er]fidia[m] in catholica fide improbantes [= Quaestiones disputatae contra Judaeos]. [Paris], Michel Le Noir, [ca. 1495]. Small 8vo (13.5 x 9.5 cm). With Michel Le Noir's large woodcut armorial device on the title-page. Set in a rotunda gothic type with printed paragraph marks, with three spaces left for 3-line initials, not filled in but with manuscript guide letters. 18th-century French calf, gold-tooled spine and board edges.

      GW M26693 (2 copies incl. the present copy); Hain & Copinger 3726; ISTC in00147400 (1 copy). Second copy recorded of the first Paris edition of a notorious anti-Jewish treatise by Nicolas de Lyra (ca. 1270-1349), a French theologian and Franciscan friar minor best known for his biblical exegesis. Some say Nicolas de Lyra himself had Jewish parents. The present scholastic work is based on a disputation held at Paris University in 1309. Summarizing the anti-Jewish polemics of Christian theology, De Lyra's disputation became a standard work of Christian apologetics and a point of departure and "source of inspiration" for many anti-Jewish books during the next centuries. With a couple contemporary annotations. With a hole in the margin of one leaf and an occasional minor smudge or stain but otherwise in fine condition. The sheet for quire b was creased before it went through the press and flattened afterwards, leaving white gaps in 3 leaves but with no loss of text. The binding with minor wear to the hinges and extremities but otherwise in very good condition. An extremely rare French incunable.

      [Bookseller: ASHER Rare Books (Since 1830)]
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        Codex Justinianus [with the Glossa ordinaria of Accursius and the Summaria of Hieronymous Clarius]

      Folio, 15.5 x 10.3 inches, 16th century blind stamped alum-yawed pigskin with the clasps, skilful repairs to hinges and top of spine, leaf edges blue, 318ff, printed in two columns within two columns of glosses, 72 to 82 lines, printed in black and red, discreet library stamp on first leaf, a few contemporary annotations in ink the margins on ff.37, 41, 42, 58, 182, 184, 185, 198, 199, early ownership in brown ink on first blank of Schwarz, a fresh copy.USA Univ of Illinois only [Goff J585]. UK no copy. GW 7743 Hain 9618, BSB-Ink C573 see Printing & the Mind of Man no.4. Not in the BL but see BL, XVth century books, V, p.xxx, p.363 for the printer. INCUNABLE PRINTING OF EMPEROR JUSTINIAN?S CODEX. The Codex Justinianus [first printed in Mainz 1475]was the first of four parts of what became known as the Corpus Juris Civilis, a collection of fundamental works on Roman law that was issued from 529 to 534 AD by order of Justinian I, Eastern Roman Emperor. It has been called "the most notable and enduring achievement of the age", in which "the old (Roman) imperium displayed its full powers" (George Ostrogorsky, History of the Byzantine State). The codex was a compilation in Latin of the existing imperial constitutiones (imperial pronouncements having the force of law), back to the time of Emperor Hadrian in the second century. Although the other parts, the Digest [Rome 1476] and the Institutes [Mainz 1468] and the Novellae [Mainz 1477], were arguably more original, containing an important anthology of jurisprudence, a handbook for teaching and a list of the most recent decrees, everything rested on the laws contained in the Codex; indeed at the time of the publication of its first version all imperial laws not included were repealed.The collections of Justinian provided the basis for law thereafter in the eastern Roman [Byzantine] empire. They were rediscovered in the West in the late eleventh century. Because the emphases in the Codex were both Christian and Imperial, it provided source material for church lawyers, in the greatest period of the development of canon law, and for civil lawyers, at a time when the Holy Roman Emperors were keen to develop their authority. It appealed, therefore, to a wide range of lawyers, the most famous on the civil side being Accursius [c.1182-c.1260], a professor at Bologna, the greatest law university of the middle ages, and a leading jurist. "For the next 500 years the Glossa[or annotations] of Accursius remained an indispensable complement to the texts of Roman law. His work made Roman law a popular course of study during the Renaissance period. Accursius?s interpretations of Roman law also influenced the development of later European legal codes, among them the Code Napoléon, or French Civil Code, enacted in the early 19th century." Encycl Britannica.The printer was Bernardinus Stagninus, de Tridino, [died 1537]. The earliest authenticated book from his press is Rhazes Liber...ad Almansorem 1483. Although the BL does not have a copy of this 1495 printing of the Codex, they have a printing by the same printer of Justinian?s Digestum with commentary by Accursius. "His output was so irregular...that it is evident he was...primarily a bookseller rather than a printer".In recent years complete copies of incunable printings of Justinian?s Codex have been very infrequently for sale in commerce.

      [Bookseller: Hamish Riley-Smith Rare Books]
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        Dionysius de statu et vita sacerdotum canonicorum clericorum aliorumque ecclesie menistratorum

      s.l.s.d. (vers 1495). Petit in / 12 reliure signée Lortic en plein maroquin bleu, dos à nerfs à filets à froid et titre doré, doré trois tranches, dentelle intérieure, 40 f. Ouvrage rare, non cité par les bibliographes. Première édition de Denis le Chartreux, de viga spirituali. Surnommé le "docteur extatique", Denis le Chartreux (1402 - 1471) n'est mentionné comme bienheureux que par quelques martyrologues de son Ordre. Né à Ryckel, près de Loos dans le pays de Liège, il fut un grand écrivain mystique. relié DeCollection

      [Bookseller: Livres Anciens Lucas Philippe]
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        [Idyllia] [and other texts]

      [Venice: Aldus Manutius, 1495. First Aldine edition, and the first complete edition of Theocritus (printing 12 of the 30 Idylls here for the first time); the first edition of HESIOD'S THEOGONY; second edition of his WORKS AND DAYS; and first editions of most of the other minor works (enumerated below); and first setting of quires £I °E F and £K °E G.. Title in Greek and Roman, introduction by Aldus in Latin;, text entirely in Greek. Woodcut decorated initials and floral or strapwork headpieces, ILLUMINATED THROUGHOUT IN COLORS AND GOLD IN A CONTEMPORARY HAND. [140] leaves. 1 vols. Folio, (315 x 210 mm.). Bound in early 18th-century mottled calf, spine in 7 compartments with citron morocco lettering piece in one and ornamental tooling in the rest; title soiled and shaved along fore-edge, extensive neatly penned marginalia in Greek and Latin, in two different hands; gilt edges, gauffered to all-over pattern of intersecting diagonal fillets and fleurons. Bookplate of St. Benedict's Abbey, Fort Augustus, Scotland. First Aldine edition, and the first complete edition of Theocritus (printing 12 of the 30 Idylls here for the first time); the first edition of HESIOD'S THEOGONY; second edition of his WORKS AND DAYS; and first editions of most of the other minor works (enumerated below); and first setting of quires £I °E F and £K °E G. Title in Greek and Roman, introduction by Aldus in Latin;, text entirely in Greek. Woodcut decorated initials and floral or strapwork headpieces, ILLUMINATED THROUGHOUT IN COLORS AND GOLD IN A CONTEMPORARY HAND. [140] leaves. 1 vols. Folio, (315 x 210 mm.). First Complete Theocritus, With Contemporary Illumination and Marginalia. First Aldine and first complete edition of the Idylls of Theocritus, of which 12 appear here for the first time, also including the first edition in the original Greek of Hesiod's Theogony and Shield of Hercules and the elegies of Theognis, as well as the second edition Hesiod's Works and Days, which were first printed in Milan circa 1480. This is the first setting of gatherings [zeta].F and [theta].G, with the text uncorrected. Not only is this copy beautifully colored in a contemporary hand (none such appear in ABPC for the last 35 years, and we are unable to find any primarily to institutional copies with coloring), but the copy is notable as well for profuse, neat contemporary marginalia, mostly in Latin, but often in Greek, which fill the book. The marginal annotations are particularly extensive in the first two Idylls, where, typically underscored words are explained in the margins; occasionally, an interlinear Latin word is provided beneath the Greek in an even smaller, but always clear, hand. The notes themselves are mostly philological in scope, with notations on unusual Doric (Theocritus's dialect) forms (e.g., the Doric preposition form for the preposition '?pòs' being '?otì', the identification of parts of speech, and grammatical forms, poetic usage, etc. Especially notable, too, are frequent comparisons and cross references to passages from Vergil's Eclogues. In the famous Idyll 2 ("Pharmaceutria"), where a spurned maiden utters incantations to bring her man back home, there now seem to be two distinct hands, and the notes are particularly frequent and copious. The first note reads: "Unde sumpta est Verg. Pharmaceutria" [whence Vergil got his Pharmaceutria] A beautiful copy of a rare and important book, with fascinating early annotations.

      [Bookseller: James Cummins Bookseller]
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        DIOMEDIS DOCTISSIMI AC DILIGENTISSIMI LINGUAE LATINAE PERSCRUTATORIS DE ARTE GRAMMATICA OPUS UTILISSIMUM

      Venetiis, per Theodor De Ragazonibus de Asula, 1495. In-4 p., mz. pelle settecentesca, dorso a cordoni con fregi e tit. oro su tassello, 84 cc.nn. Al verso del front.: "In hoc volumine continentur: DIOMEDES (...) - PHOCAS "De nomine et verbo. Epitoma Prisciani" - CAPER: "De latinitate" - AGRAETIUS: "De orthographia et proprietate et differentia sermonis" - DONATUS: "De barbarismo et octo partibus orationis" - SERVIUS: "In secundam Donati editionem interpretatio" - SERGIUS: "In secundam Donati editionem commentarius". Al recto della c. 84: "Impressum Venetiis per Theodor De Ragazonibus de Asula. Anno Domini nostri Iesu Christi. MCCCCLXXXXV. Die vero.XII.mensis Iuni" e il registro. Cfr.Hain,II,6219 - Goff "Incunabula in American Libraries",214 - Incunabuli della Biblioteca di Bergamo,453 - The British Library,216 - Essling,II,563 e 564 cita solo le ediz. del 1491 e 1494 con frontesp. illustrato. Manca all?'Adams. Solo piccolissimi fori di tarlo e lievi aloni marginali su alc. carte; antiche annotazioni marginali, altrimenti bell'esemplare. "Diomede, grammatico latino della seconda meta' del IV secolo D.C., autore di un'Ars Grammatica in tre libri (1°: le parti del discorso - 2°: gli elementi della grammatica - 3°: (il piu' importante) poetica e metrica), utilissimi anche per la storia dei generi letterari". Cosi' Dizionario Treccani,IV, p. 71. .

      [Bookseller: Libreria Malavasi sas]
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        Divi Thome de Aquino ordinis predicatorum commentaria in omnes epistolas beati Pauli apostoli: gloriosissimi gentium doctoris, profundiora theologie accurate dilucidantia. (Colophon:)

      impressa: ductu vero et impensis Wolfgangi Lachner... 1495 THOMAS (S.) DE AQUINO (1226 - 1274). Divi Thome de Aquino ordinis predicatorum commentaria in omnes epistolas beati Pauli apostoli: gloriosissimi gentium doctoris, profundiora theologie accurate dilucidantia. (Colophon:) Basileae impressa: ductu vero et impensis Wolfgangi Lachner...1495. In - folio (308 x 215 mm.), cartonatura secentesca. (294 ff.) segn. a8, b - z A - Y6, Z8, (1,2)4, (3 - 7)10. I ff. (280) e (294) sono bianchi. Carattere gotico, 2 colonne eccettuato il registro che ne ha 4, 66 linee+ quella di testa. Il primo f. col titolo è foderato, sporadici aloni di umidità in pochi ff. all' interno; l' esemplare peraltro è ben conservato e non rifilato. Edizione svizzera rarissima. Hain - Copinger, 1339. Pellechet, 942. Polain, 3695. Oates, 2829. Proctor, 7727. B.M.C., III, p. 783. Goff, T - 234.

      [Bookseller: Brighenti libri esauriti e rari]
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        Triunpho de María. (1495). [Facsimil de "Por alabança de la preciosa virgen y madre de cristo ihesu: comiença el libro intitulado triumpho de maria". Impreso en "Zaragoça a expensas Paulo Iburus alemán, 1495"]

      - EDICION FACSIMIL, LIMITADA Y NUMERADA.- Valencia: "la fonte que mana y corre", Imp. en los Talleres de Tipografía Moderna, 1952.- [1 h.] + 66 hojas sin numerar del facsimil + [3 h. dos de las cuales van en blanco]: Xilografías facsímiles intercaladas en el texto; 4º (25 cm.); Cuidada impresión sobre excelente papel de hilo verjurado; Enc. en Plena Piel chagrén verde intenso, ruedas doradas en tapas, lomo dorado y con 5 nervios, cabeza pintada, conserva las cubiertas originales.- (Incunables Poéticos Castellanos. I).- Consta la edición de 225 ejemplares, numerados del 1 al 225. (POSEEMOS 3 EJEMPLARES CON LOS Nos. 58, 61 y 190). Además se editaron 30 marcados de A a Z. Ha sido dirigida por Antonio Pérez y Gómez y realizada, al cuidado de María Amparo y Vicente Soler. PRECIOSA EDICION DE BIBLIOFILO ENCUADERNADA MAGISTRALMENTE.{ Libro en español [Attributes: Hard Cover]

      [Bookseller: Librería Miguel Miranda, AILA ILAB]
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        [Organon] i.e.: Porphyrii introductio sive uniuersalia Aristotelis. Praedicamenta. Peri hermeneias i de interpraetatione. Priora resolutoria. Posteria resolutoria. Topica. Elenchi.

      Venice, Aldus Manutius, 1495. Small folio. Lovely contemporary full leather binding (presumably French) with blindtooled borders and ornamentation to boards. Magnificently rebacked, perfectly matching the boards, with 6 raiswed bands and blindstamped ornamentation. Leather ties to boards expertly renewed. Handwritten title to bottom edge. Some wear to boards, but all in all very nice indeed. Smudging to first two words of the first leaf and some occasional light minor soiling or browning, but otherwise a very nice, clean, and fresh copy, with large margins. A single, small marginal wormhole, far from affecting text. Contemporary marginal annotations in an elegant humanist hand, in both Greek and Latin. Final blank with neat annotations in Greek and Latin and a diagram. (234) ff.. Editio princeps of Aristotle's logical works (as well as the editio princeps of Porphyrios' "Isagoge"), arguably the most important publication in the entire history of printing. When Aldus Manuzio, the first and most celebrated scholar-printer of the Renaissance, began publishing - for the first time in history - the works of Aristotle in the original Greek, he inaugurated a new era in the history of mankind, making the present volume one of the most important moments in the history of the book. The importance of his seminal Aristotle-edition can hardly be over-estimated. Constituting the first major Greek prose text (or collection of texts) to be printed in its original language, it epitomizes the role of printing in re-introducing the original classical Greek texts to the Western world after centuries of unavailability. Aldus published all of Aristotle's extant works over a period of three years, beginning with the logical works that are collected under the joint title of the "Organon". This "Organon"-volume inaugurated the single greatest printing-venture of the Renaissance. Two years later, in 1497, another volume appeared, and by the following year, all of Aristotle's works had seen the light of day in their original Greek. In all five volumes appeared, each devoted to their own subject. All volumes constitute separate publications and were distributed and sold separately. "The separate editions issued over the four years 1495-98, each volume bearing an allusion to the privilege granted by the senate, was undoubtedly conceived of as a series, though each was available by itself. Aldus himself distinguished between the volume of logical works (the 'Organon', or 'instrument', so called from a poem prefixed to this edition) that was published in November 1495 and the later volumes of 'philosophy'" (Davies, p. 20). "Aldo Manuzio printed the first Greek Aristotle in Venice between 1495 and 1498, the first Greek Plato in 1514, inaugurating a unique age in the history of high culture during which the humanists edited the first philosophical texts - ancient, medieval, and contemporary - to be widely distributed and reproduced in a relatively precise manner." (Copenhaver&Schmitt, p. 35). "'The Aldine Aristotle' remains, in terms of the labour involved and the magnificence of the result, the greatest publishing venture of the fifteenth century. The centrality of Aristotle in intellectual life of the time can hardly be overstressed. In Latin dress he lay at the heart of any university course in philosophy, as dominant at the end of the Quattrocento as in the preceding three hundred years. The humanist return "ad fontes", to the original unobscured by imprecise translation and the encrustations of scholastic commentary, was the indispenable background to the edition." (Davies, p. 21).It is no coincidence that the first volume to appear in the editio princeps of the Aristotelian corpus was the "Organon", the logical works. These presented the cornerstone of all philosophy and all science, also during the Renaissance. "When Galileo first saw the moons of Jupiter in 1610, Aristotle was still the starting-point for philosophical discourse in Western Europe, although new humanist discoveries beginning in the fifteenth century had supplemented and challenged the Peripatetic system with Platonic and other Greek philosophies. "System" is perhaps the key word in appreciating the scope and structure of Aristotle's heritage. To enter that system, a medieval or Renaissance student would begin with Aristotle's logical works (the "organon" or "tool") to find rules and techniques for clear thinking, advice on constructing valid and persuasive arguments, and a method for reaching what we would call "scientific" conclusions demonstratively or deductively." (Copenhaver & Schmitt, p. 10). Aristotle's logical works (which we ever since Antiquity have called the "Organon" - i.e. "tool") arguably constitute the most influential collection of works in the history of Western thought. The contents of the "organon" are: 1. Categories, 2. On Interpretation, 3. Prior Analytics, 4. Posterior Analytics, 5. Topics, 6. On Sophistical Refutations - which ever since late Antiquity/early Middle Ages have been accompanied by Porphyrios' (233/34-ca.310) "Isagoge", his introduction to Aristotle's "Categories". During the Renaissance, all editions of Aristotle's "Organon" also comprised Porphyrios' "Isagoge", which was seen as necessary for the understanding of Aristotle's logic. Aristotle's logic has played a seminal role in the history of Western thought. No other collection of writings has had an impact on the history of philosophy that comes close to the "Organon", an impact that remains pivotal to this day. "Aristotle's logic, especially his theory of the syllogism, has had an unparalleled influence on the history of Western thought." (SEP).From Antiquity, the earlier middle ages had inherited Boethius' translation of the two first treatises of Aristotle's "Organon", along with Porphyrios' "Isagoge". These works formed the basis for logical study and teaching until the end of the 11th century. Only during the 12th and 13th centuries, were Aristotle's writings - along with those of the Arabic and some of the Greek commentators - translated into Latin. When the medieval universities reached their full development during the thirteenth century, Aristotle's works were adapted as the standard textbooks for all philosophical disciplines - thus modern terms for many philosophical and scientific disciplines correspond to the titles of Aristotle's works (e.g. Ethics, Physics, Metaphysics). Through Aristotle's works, the West thus acquired, not only the specific problems and ideas that were being dealt with at the universities, but also the terminology used to describe and discuss them and the systematic framework within which all relevant problems should and could be treated. But come the Renaissance, we see a clear change in the use of Aristotle's works. We here witness something other than a mere continuation of the late medieval Aristotelianism. The Humanists began supplying new translations of Aristotle's works and translated all the Greek commentators of Aristotle, many of them for the first time. And thus, sparked by the first edition of the original Greek text, a tendency to emphasize the original Greek Aristotle developed, a tendency that became pivotal for the development of modern thought - the development of modern science and modern philosophy is inextricably linked with the Renaissance Humanist editions of Aristotle's works in Greek. The "Organon", Aristotle's seminal logical writings, occupies a central position within the Aristotelian body of writing and thus within the development of Western thought. Certain Humanist versions of the Greek text (and of the Latin translations, as well as the interpretations of the texts), thus came to play a seminal role in the trajectory of Renaissance and modern thought; it goes without saying that the seminal editio princeps of the "organon" remains unrivalled in this respect.Aldus Manutius (1449-1515) was born in the neighbourhood of Velletri, "he was early imbued with classical learning by two natives of Verona, having studied Latin in Rome under Gaspare, and Greek as well as Latin under Guarino at Ferrara. His younger fellow-student, the brilliant Pico of Mirandola, recommended Aldus as tutor to his nephews Alberto and Lionello Pio at Carpi, and it was at Carpi that Aldus matured his plans for starting a Greek press with the aid of Alberto Pio. The press was ultimately founded in Venice, the model for the Greek type supplied by the Cretan Marcus Musurus and most of the compositors were natives of Crete." (Sandy, II:98).Aldus's role in the history of printing remains unsurpassed. Being first and foremost an eminent scholar, Aldus differed from many of the other important printers both before and after him. He was 40 when he began his new career as a printer, and his goal was to make available to the Renaissance humanists the classical texts that they would otherwise not have had access to. It is no coincidence that the enthusiastic disseminator of especially Greek knowledge would begin his career with the printing of Aristotle's "organon", which was one of the very first books that he published. The text is printed using the first two Aldine Greek types and is beautifully ornamented with decorated borders and capitals. Few of his publications would be so beautifully equipped. Aldus' magnificent Greek types, which were based upon contemporary scholarly calligraphy were greatly admired, widely imitated and influenced all Renaissance printing, exerting enormous influence on later Greek founts.. "LOGIC, TOOL OF SCIENCE. A splendid typographical accomplishment by Aldus of the first appearance of Aristotle in Greek... To all science, he [i.e. Aristotle] directed the instrument of formal logic and precision... [He] pioneered classification of data and set the pattern for scientific thought (sometimes erroneous) for nearly 2000 years." (Dibner)."Aristotle is not only one of the greatest classical philosophers, the master of every branch of ancient knowledge: his method still underlies all modern thinking... [t]he great Aldine "editio princeps", issued in five folio volumes between 1495 and 1498, was the first major Greek prose text to be reintroduced in the original to the western world by the invention of the printing press." (PMM). Dibner:73; PMM:38; Renouard: pp. 7-9; Hook & Norman:70; Dibdin: I:311; Sandy's: II:104; Stillwell: 570.See also: Nicolas Barker: Aldus Manutius (chapters 6 and 7); Davies, Aldus Manutius, Printer and Publisher of Renaissance Venice; Copenhaver & Schmitt: Renaissance Philosophy; Martin Lowry: The World of Aldus Manutius

      [Bookseller: Lynge & Søn A/S]
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        Sermones de sanctis cum vigintitribus Pauli Wann sermonibus. Passau, Johann Petri 1490-91. Fol. Got. Type in 2 Größen, 2 Sp., 42 Zl., mit Kolumnentiteln, 402 Bll. (19. u. l. w), tls. rubriziert, blindgepr. Ldrbd. d. Zt. über Holzdeckeln mit späterem Prgt.-Rücken mit hs. Rsch.

      - GW M18683 - Goff L-270 - HC 10172 - BMC II 617 - BSB-Ink L-216.- Erste Ausgabe.- Der Inkunabel-Katalog deutscher Bibliotheken (INKA) gibt als möglichen Druckerort u. Drucker auch ?Straßburg, Johann Grüninger um 1495? an.- M. Lochmaier, ?eines der ausgezeichneteren Mitglieder der Wiener Universität aus der rheinischen Nation? (ADB XIX, 64) war Nachfolger des 1489 verstorbenen Paul Wann als Kanonikus, Dr. der Theologie und des kanonischen Rechts auf der Domkanzel in Passau.- Wanns 23 Predigten sind über das ganze Buch verteilt und zusätzlich numeriert.- Titel mit kl. überklebt. Ausschnitt, 7 Bll. zu Beginn mit kl. Beschädigungen im Rand durch Wurmfraß, tls. leicht braunfleckig od. wasserrandig, Ebd. mit kl. Bezugsfehlstellen u. Wurmgängen. [Attributes: First Edition; Hard Cover]

      [Bookseller: Antiquariat Müller]
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        Hoc in volumine continentur. M. Tulii Ciceronis Epistolarum familiarum libri sexdecim. Ubertini Clerici Crescentinatis in Ciceronis epistolas commentarii. Martini Philetici in quasdam epistolas ellectas commentarii. Giorgii Merulae Alexandrini in epistolam ad Lentulum Spintherem accurata interpretatio. Addita sunt etiam nonnulla alia loca in libro miscelanearum per Angelum Politianum interpraetata.

      Venice: Simonem Bivilaqua Papiensem 1495 - frequent small woodcut decorative initials, small wormhole in last 6 leaves (affecting a couple of characters on last 2), a few tiny wormholes in first 10 or so leaves (mostly marginal but one just touching a character on some leaves), first and last few leaves soiled, a little dampmarking at end, small stains and ink blots elsewhere, light browning in places, old ownership inscriptions gently washed from title, ff. [iv], 228, folio, early eighteenth-century vellum, rebacked preserving original spine with lettering piece (a bit chipped) and marbled endpapers, a little simple gilt decoration, boards lightly soiled and bowing slightly, sound Directly reprinted from Locatellus’s 1494 edition (BMC), but the specific arrangement of texts goes back at least as far as a 1491 Pincius edition and Clericus’s commentary was first published in 1480; it saw at least 20 printings in the incunable period alone. Clericus (c.1430-c.1500) was professor of rhetoric at Pavia; his other major printed commentary was on Ovid’s Heroides, while work on the Metamorphoses and De Officiis apparently went unpublished and has not survived. Also printed with the text is commentary by Martin Phileticus and prefatory material by Poliziano - excerpts from his ‘Miscellaneorum centuria prima’ - and Georgius Merula (who is known for his feuds with Poliziano). Many of the editions the Epistolae ad Familiares with these commentaries are scarce, and for this one ISTC gives three copies in the UK (BL - mutilated and imperfect - John Rylands, and Shrewsbury), and three in the USA (Yale, Brigham Young, Huntington), with 17 further copies spread around Europe. There have been no more than a handful of incunable editions of the Epistolae ad Familiares at UK or US auctions in the last thirty years, and none of this particular printing. (ISTC ic00532000; Goff C532; BMC V 520)

      [Bookseller: Blackwell's Rare Books ABA ILAB BA]
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        Orationes (Orationes horum rhetorum; Orationes infrascriptorum rhetorum; Isocratis orationes. . . .).Venice, Aldus Manutius and Andre Torresani d'Asola, April-May 1513. 3 volumes bound as 2. Folio (30×20 cm). With Aldus's woodcut dolphin and anchor device on the three title-pages and at the end of volume 3; title-page for each volume printed in Greek and Latin; the two dedications in Latin, the texts in Greek; spaces with printed guide letters left for initials (not filled in). With 48-49 lines/page plus running heads. Early 19th-century English red grained morocco, gold- and blind-tooled.

      Ahmanson-Murphy 112; Hoffman 3, p.167; Kallendorf & Wells, Aldine Press Books 99; Renouard, pp. 60-62. Very important first edition of most of the Attic orators, the works of Demosthenes having been published earlier. It is one of the most important and beautiful books printed by the famous Aldine printing office, two years before Aldus Manutius's death. It includes texts by Aeschines, Lysias, Alcidamas, Anthisthenes, Damades, Andocides, Isaeus, Dinarchus, Antiphon, Lycurgus, Gorgias, Lesbonax, Herodes, Isocrates and Aristides. There are two important dedicatory letters by Aldus Manutius: one to Francesco Fasolo and one to Giovanni Battista Egnazio. The main texts are set entirely in Aldus's ligatured Greek type, a style he introduced in 1495 that established the main stream of Greek printing types that reigned for two hundred years. Provenance: British Museum Library (duplicate sale 1814); Charles P. Burney; Charles Bloomfield (on his death in 1857 his heirs returned the book to Charles Burney, who had given it to him); William Foyle. The leaf with a 2-line instruction to the binder, in volume 1, has been removed as intended (as in nearly every copy). Very occasional slight browning or faint stains, the lower margin of quire ff extended. In very good condition. The bindings are somewhat worn on the spine, hinges and edges, but still in good condition. Beautiful first edition of the Attic orators, rarely found in such good condition.

      [Bookseller: ASHER Rare Books (Since 1830)]
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        [Indication of contents in Greek followed by Latin:] Haec insunt in hoc libro. Theocriti Eclogae triginta. Genus Theocriti & De inventione bucolicorum. Catonis Romani sententiae paraeneticae Distichi. Sententiae septem sapientum. De invidia. Theognidis megarensis siculi sententiae Elegiacae. Sententiae monostichi per capita ex variis poetis. Aurea carmina Pythagorae. Phocylidae Poema admonitorium. Carmina Sibyllae erythraeae De Christo Jesu domino n[ost]ro. Differentia vocis. Hesiodi Theogonia. Eiusdem Scutum Herculis. Eiusdem Georgicon libri duo.Venice, Aldus Manutius, February "1495" [=1496]. Folio. With 8 fine woodcut headpieces (2 by the famous Poliphilus master) plus 29 repeats, and 23 woodcut outline interlaced initials (3 series: 3-line, 5-line and 7-line) plus 16 repeats. Modern red morocco, gold- and blind-blocked.

      Essling 888; Hoffmann III, 473-474; IDL 4302; IGI 9497; Renouard, p. 1495, no. 3 ("éd. très rare"); Sander 7235; UCLA 7. Rare first issue of the first and only edition of a collection of Greek works, many of the individual works appearing here in their first editions: one of the first books produced by the famous printer-publisher Aldus Manutius, published less than a year after his first book. In fact Aldus printed only one complete book before the present edition though he also issued the first parts of two others (all in Greek), and published Bembo's Latin De Aetna in the same month.The first editions in the present collection include 12 of the Ecloques of Theocritus, Hesiod's Theogonia (or De generatione deorum) and selections from the Greek gnomic poets. It is the most interesting of all Aldine Greek editions, containing a wide variety of linguistic forms and packed with mythological or moralizing passages, and as such highly interesting for the history of education and of humanism in general and the beginning of the study of Greek language and literature in particular. There are two issues of the present edition, and the present first issue is the rarer. With armorial bookplate on the last leaf, below the colophon. In very good condition and with large margins, with the first 2 and last 2 leaves somewhat foxed, a few leaves with small marginal worm holes along the foot edge or very faint marginal water stains, none approaching the text. One of the most important books, and nearly the first, printed by Aldus Manutius, in the rare first issue.

      [Bookseller: ASHER Rare Books (Since 1830)]
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        Operetta del amore di Jesu / Composta da Fratre Hieronimo da Ferrara

      Bartolomeo de Libri, FIRENZE 1495 - SAVONAROLA Gerolamo(1452-1498) ~ Operetta del amore di Jesu / Composta da Fratre Hieronimo da Ferrara A Florence, Bartolomeo de Libri, 1495 In-4, incunable, caractères romains, 33 lignes 22 feuillets signés d-b par 8, c par 6. demi-maroquin post., Edition ornée de 3 superbes bois au trait, dont un grand sur le titre représentant la vierge, Marie Madeleine au pied de la croix, le Christ en croix, Dieu le Père tenant le corps du Christ sur ses genoux. Ex-libris Jules Janin Référence: [Hain]-Copinger 14348 BM 15th cent. VI 659 BN cat. des incun., S-77 Copinger 5277 Giovannozzi, L. Contributo, 144 Goff S-170 IGI 8785 Kristeller, P. Woodcuts, 374b Pellechet (ms.) 10236 Proctor 6269 Rhodes, D.E. Annali, 690 Sander 6852 Scapecchi, P. Cat. Savonarola, 144 Also issued on microfiche [Attributes: First Edition; Hard Cover]

      [Bookseller: Incunable]
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        Illuminated leaf from a Book of Hours

      Paris or Rouen: circa, 1495. Illuminated leaf, 215 x 152 mm., with a panel border on both sides of the leaf composed of blue and gold acanthus leaves and coloured flowers and leaves on diagonal grounds of liquid gold, illuminated initials in white tracery on pink grounds, and numerous 1-line initials in gold alternately on red and blue grounds, naturalistic branch line fillers; 27 lines of text in gothic script. A beautifully illuminated leaf from a luxurious fifteenth-century French Book of Hours. This leaf is from the shorter version of the central text of the Book of Hours, modelled on the Divine Office and performed at the eight canonical hours of the day and which was called the "Little Office of the Blessed Virgin" (or Hours of the Virgin). The panel border on each side of the leaf is composed of fields of blue and gold acanthus leaves interspersed with mauve, red, blue and white flowers on zig-zag grounds of liquid gold. Additionally, there are four 2-line initials in white on pink grounds; five 1-line initials in liquid gold on blue or red and four line-fillers in similar colours. The delicate initials are typical of the work executed in Paris or Rouen; in tandem with the generous application of liquid gold in the margins, it places this work as hailing from the late fifteenth century.

      [Bookseller: Hordern House Rare Books]
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        Colonia

      Nürnberg ca. 1495. Karte zeigt die Stadt Köln, Rückseite Stammbaum der Königlichen Familie und Portraits von Herzögen und Philosophen, Aus der berühmten Schedelschen Weltchronik, altkoloriert, Holzschnitt, 36 x 52,5. Zustand: Perfekt, dem Alter entsprechend

      [Bookseller: Antique Sommer & Sapunaru KG]
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        1495 Brescia Incunable Ludolph of Saxony Vita Christi Life of Christ Incunabula

      [Brescia] : Impressa Brixie per Magistrum Angelum et Jacobum de Britannicis, Anno Domini M.CCCCLXXXXV, die XXX octobris [30 Oct. 1495] - 1495 Brescia Incunable Ludolph of Saxony Vita Christi Life of Christ Incunabula Extremely Rare & Famous / COMPLETE Ludolph of Saxony (c. 1300 – 1378), also known as Ludolphus de Saxonia and Ludolph the Carthusian, was a German Roman Catholic theologian of the fourteenth century. His principal work, Vita Christi (Life of Christ), was written in 1374. It had significant influence on the development of techniques for Christian meditation by introducing the concept of immersing and projecting oneself into a Biblical scene about the life of Jesus which became popular among the Devotio Moderna community, and later influenced Ignatius of Loyola. Main author: Ludolf, von Sachsen; Giacomo Britannico; Angelus Britanicus Title: Landulfus Cartusiensis In meditationes vite Christi et super evangeliis totius anni opus divinum. [Vita Christi] [Prime partis. Incipit liber de vita Jesu Christi] [Secunde partis hujus libri. De confessione vere fidei] Published: [Brescia] : Impressa Brixie per Magistrum Angelum et Jacobum de Britannicis, Anno Domini M.CCCCLXXXXV, die XXX octobris [30 Oct. 1495] Language: Latin Reference: GW M19191. ISTC il00347000. HC 9876. Pell-Pol 7267. BNCI L 268. Pol 2536. IGI 5877. BMC VII, 977 (IA. 31150). Goff L 347. CIH 2113. -VERY RARE. According to ISTC, there is only 3 copies in USA, 2 copies in UK. Many copies in the rest of the world are incomplete or imperfect. FREE SHIPPING WORLDWIDE Wear: wear as seen in photos Binding: tight and secure binding Pages: complete with all 544 leafs (twice as many pages by modern pagination methods); plus indexes, prefaces, and such Publisher: [Brescia] : Impressa Brixie per Magistrum Angelum et Jacobum de Britannicis, Anno Domini M.CCCCLXXXXV, die XXX octobris [30 Oct. 1495] Size: ~7in X 5in (18cm x 13cm) Photos available upon request. [Attributes: Hard Cover]

      [Bookseller: Schilb Antiquarian]
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        Sermones de tempore et de sanctis, niederl.. Blatt mit Salvator Mundi vom "Haarlemer Holzschneider". (GW 3948, HCR 2854, CA 276)

      Zwolle, Peter van Os, 27. Mai 1495. Type 6 und 8A.. Zweispaltiges, 40-zeiliges Original-Inkunabelblatt mit einem altkolorierten ganzseitigen Holzschnitt (12,5 x 18,2 cm) mit dem Spruchband "Speciosus forma pre filys ho(min)um". Blatt beschnitten und mit der Signatur "a ii" und dem Wasserzeichen "Hand". Rückseite mit zweispaltigem Text. Blattgröße: 15 x 21 cm. Incunabula text woodcut leaf.. Dieser Holzschnitt wurde 1487 vom berühmten "Haarlemer Holzschneider", dessen Name unbekannt geblieben ist, gefertigt. Er arbeitete von 1483 bis 1486 im Auftrag von Jacob Bellaert in Haarlem. Im Jahre 1486 verschwand Jacob Bellaert's Druckerpresse in Haarlem und im darauffolgenden Jahr befand sich der "Haarlemer Holzschneider" in Antwerpen und arbeitete nun für den Buchdrucker Gerard Leeu. Schretlen schreibt über die Tätigkeit des Künstlers in Antwerpen: "We find here (in Antwerp) the same genial descriptive qualities which characterise his Haarlem works." (Schretlen 1925, S. 33) Nach Schretlen gehört dieser hier vorliegende, in Antwerpen geschnittene Holzschnitt zum Alterswerk des Haarlemer Künstlers. Schretlen schreibt: "In 1487 Gerard Leeu published a Ludolphus (C.A. 1181) which contains several folio-woodcuts by this artist (The Haarlem woodcutter). ... The representation of Christ as Salvator Mundi too is characteristic of the artist's style. He made an entirely new picture of this conventional print; the gorgeous flowered carpet as background and the well chosen shaded parts produce an incomparably pituresque effect." (Schretlen 1925, S. 33) Pieter van Os verwendete für seine Ausgabe der Predigten des Bernardus Claravallensis in Jahre 1495 diesen Holzschnitt erneut. Das hier angebotene Blatt mit dem Holzschnitt des Haarlemer Künstlers ist im Werk "Dutch and Flemish woodcuts of the fifteenth century" von Schretlen abgebildet. (Schretlen 1925, Tafel 62 A)

      [Bookseller: Versandantiquariat Christine Laist]
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        Plenarium, deutsch. Blatt CIX. (H6743, GWM34067)

      Augsburg, Erhard Ratdolt, 30. März 1495. Type 7, 12.. Zweispaltiges, 44-zeiliges Original-Inkunabelblatt (16,1 x 22,7 cm), im Randbereich etwas fingerfleckig und ein kl. Wurmloch, sechzeilige Holzschnittinitiale und kolorierter Holzschnitt (13,2 x 6,1 cm) über beide Zeilen. Incunabula text woodcut leaf.. Seltenes Blatt mit der Darstellung einer frei und offen anmutenden Predigtszene! Rara. Ratdolt, geboren um 1447 und gestorben vor 23.1.1528, arbeitete als Buchdrucker und Buchführer. Er war Mitglied der Zunft der Salzfertiger. In erster Ehe war er mit Anna Eisenhofer verheiratet. Aus der 2. Ehe mit Veronika Epishofer ging Georg Ratdolt (1486 - 1541/42) hervor, der nach seinem Studium in Ingolstadt ab etwa 1510 v.a. für den Vertrieb zuständig war und 1513 Walburga Arzt heiratete. Ratdolt richtete seine erste Druckerei 1476-1485 in Venedig ein; seine Drucke (v.a. astronomische und liturgische Werke) mit kunstvollen Titelblattbordüren und Initialen in Zweifarbendruck gehören zu den qualitativ besten Erzeugnissen der Zeit.

      [Bookseller: Versandantiquariat Christine Laist]
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        Canones poenitentiales.

      [Nürnberg, Peter Wagner, ca. 1495].. Got. Type, 33 Zeilen. 8 nicht numerierte Bll. Mod. marmorierter Halblederband mit goldgeprägtem Rückentitel. 4to.. Wohl die erste Einzelausgabe der 'Canones' aus der 'Summa de casibus conscientiae', dem Hauptwerk des Astesanus de Ast. Der GW kennt noch eine ebenfalls undatierte Leipziger Ausgabe sowie die im Folgejahr in Wien erschienene Edition. Eine Besonderheit des vorliegenden Drucks ist Peter Wagners gleichzeitige Verwendung von in Holz geschnittener Titelzeile und Typendruck am ersten Blatt, "an experiment not found elsewhere" (BMC). - Spuren eines kl. getilgten Stempels am Titel, sonst sehr schönes und frisches Exemplar in einem ansprechenden Einband. - GW 2747. Goff A 1158. HC 4340. BMC II, 465. ISTC ia01158000.

      [Bookseller: Antiquariat Inlibris, Gilhofer Nfg. GmbH]
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        Französische Handschrift des 18. Jahrhunderts in brauner Tinte auf Papier, einspaltig, zu 24 bis 29 Zeilen,

      (1) weißes Bl., 342 (nur anfangs numerierte) Seiten, (2) weiße Bl., Blattgröße 22 x 17 cm,. nicht datiert (das sechseitige Register später hinzugefügt), in einem Lederband der Zeit auf fünf unechten Bünden, mit goldgeprägtem Rückenschild und reicher Rückenvergoldung, Stehkantenvergoldung, dreiseitiger Rotschnitt und marmorierte Vorsätze (Kanten berieben, Gelenke mit Einrissen, die vordere Decke mit kl. Fehlstellen im Bezug).. Die erste Textseite beginnt mit der Überschrift 'Secunda miscellaneorum Chilias'. Die Sprache des Kommentars ist französisch, die überaus zahlreichen Zitate aber sind in lateinischer, italienischer, griechischer und seltener auch in spanischer Originalsprache wiedergegeben. Die einzelnen Miszellen, Sinnsprüche, Annotationen, Kommentare und Apercus sind von 1 bis 1000 durchnummeriert und ergeben als "Sammlung merk-würdiger Dinge" eine typische Arbeit des 18. Jahrhunderts : ein positiv gesinntes Spiel mit Wissen und Bildung, eine philosophische Lagebeurteilung, die sich bisweilen witzig, bisweilen ernst, immer aber voller esprit, der klassisch-antiken und zeitgenössischen Literatur bedient, um Aufklärung zu betreiben. Entsprechend reicht die Auswahl der Autoren von der griechischen und lateinischen Klassik, über die etablierten Geistesgrößen der Renaissance wie Peucer oder Macrobius, bis hin zu den 'modernen' Reiseschriftstellern wie Pyrard, Pietro de la Valle und Tavernier. Die ersten 30 Miszellen behandeln Holland, es folgen einige Anmerkungen zu Gräbern und Bestattungsriten, dann Ausführungen zur französischen Geschichte und Topographie, zu Inschriften und Neuigkeiten, wie einer ewigen Flamme in der Nähe von Grenoble. Zu den häufiger vorkommenden Themen gehören Kirchengeschichte und Religion (Papsttum, Jesuiten, Jansenismus, Atheismus) und es werden auch irrationale Phänomene wie Talismänner, Horoskope und Prophezeiungen behandelt - alles immer wieder unterbrochen von den unterschiedlichsten Aphorismen. So wird berichtet, daß ein Gesandter im fernen Sudan eine arme Frau, der er auf der Straße begegnete, fragte, warum sie in der einen Hand Feuer und in der anderen Wasser trage, zur Antwort erhielt, sie trage das Feuer um das Paradies zu verbrennen und Wasser, um die Flammen der Hölle zu löschen. Viele der Aphorismen durchzieht eine solche freigeistige Ironie: zitiert wird etwa eine Inschrift eines Hauses in Villeneve "Vivent les lys, vive bourbon, vive Henry quatre de ce nom, vive cekuy qui pour sa reverence a fait poser ici les armoiries de France (1495). Ein aufmerksamer Leser des vorliegenden Manuskriptes hatte bereits im 19. Jahrhundert auf einem kl. Notizzettel, der sich auf dem Vorsatz verso findet, bemerkt : "une vaste compilation d'extraits et d'etudes de nombreux ouvrages curieux et peu connus ... Outre la valeur de cette documentation, elle nous revele la tournure d'esprit d'un lettre du 18ieme siecle". Die erste Textseite und Seite 25 mit dem Stempel 'Bibliotheque de la Daviere'; stellenweise kl. Tintenflecke, eine Seite alt hinterlegt.

      [Bookseller: Antiquariat Elvira Tasbach]
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        Modus epistolandi.

      Lyon, Drucker des Baldovinus Sabaudiensis (GW 3208) ?, um 1495-1500.. 8°. 7 (von 74) nn. Bl. (d.i. nn Bl. 67-73). Blindgeprägter Lederband des 20. Jahrhundert (gering berieben). - Einspaltiger Druck in 43 Zeilen. - GW 10014; Pellechet 4825. - Letzte Lage (ohne das letzte weiße Blatt) dieser Sammlung von Abhandlungen von Stephanus Fliscus, Gasparinus Barzizius, Pseudo-Cicero und dem abschließenden "De conconficiendis epistolis" von Guillelmus Saphonensis, aus welchem der vorliegende Text stammt. - Sehr seltener Druck mit nur 3 Standorten im GW (davon 2 inkomplett). Goff weist diesen Lyoneser Drucker Janon Carcain zu mit einer weiteren möglichen Erscheinungsspanne von 1486-1500. - Gebräunt, wasserrandig und etwas fleckig. 3 kleine Randmarginalien von alter Hand, die letzte Seite mit weiteren Eintragungen alter Hand und Federproben. Aufwendig gebundenes Fragment einer sehr seltenen Inkunabel..

      [Bookseller: Antiquariat Christoph Sebald]
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        Thesaurus Magistri sententiaru(m) cum plenis sententiis in ordine(m) alphabeticum redactus. (Speyer, Peter Drach) 1495. 4°. 142 nn.Bll., das letzte weiß, Holzdeckelbd. d. Zt. mit breitem blindgepr. Lederrücken u. 2 Messingschließen.

      . . Hain-C. 10201 - GW M32602 - Goff P498 - BMC II 499.- Seltener Druck auf kräftigem Papier.- Titel etw. fleckig, tls. leicht wasserrandig oder leicht braunfleckig, rechter Rand tls. mit verlaufendem kl. Braunfleck, Initialen in schwarzer Tinte meist etw. durchscheinend, insges. gutes, breitrandiges Exemplar im ersten Einband.

      [Bookseller: Antiquariat Johannes Müller]
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        Urkunde m. eigh. U. ("Rex Ferd")

      Ischia, 4.April 1495. Lateinische Handschrift auf Pergament, quer-Imperial-Folio, kleinere Defekte, Siegel fehlt.. Ernennung des Galcerano de Requisens zum Gouverneur von Kalabrien mit eigh. Gegenzeichnung von CHARITEO (= Benedetto Gareth, genannt Chariteo, ca. 1450-1514, berühmter ital. Dichter, Musiker und Diplomat katalanischer Herrkunft). Nach der Invasion Karl VIII. von Frankreich in Neapel war Ferdinand, der aufgrund der Abdankung seines Vaters Alfons 1495 König geworden war, nach Ischia geflohen, kehrte aber, nachdem Karl nach seiner Krönung Neapel mit dem größten Teil seines Heeres wieder verlassen hatte, mit eigenen Truppen auf das Festland zurück, wo es ihm 1496 mit spanischer Hilfe gelang, die Franzosen unter Vizekönig Gilbert von Bourbon-Montpensier (1443-1496) bei Atella zur Kapitulation zu zwingen. Seltenes Zeugnis aus der kurzen Zeit Ferdinands in Ischia.

      [Bookseller: Versandantiquariat manuscryptum - Dr. In]
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        Sermones de sanctis cum vigintitribus Pauli Wann sermonibus. Passau, Johann Petri 1490-91. Fol. Got. Type in 2 Größen, 2 Sp., 42 Zl., mit Kolumnentiteln, 402 Bll. (19. u. l. w), tls. rubriziert, blindgepr. Ldrbd. d. Zt. über Holzdeckeln mit späterem Prgt.-Rücken mit hs. Rsch.

      . . GW M18683 - Goff L-270 - HC 10172 - BMC II 617 - BSB-Ink L-216.- Erste Ausgabe.- Der Inkunabel-Katalog deutscher Bibliotheken (INKA) gibt als möglichen Druckerort u. Drucker auch "Straßburg, Johann Grüninger um 1495" an.- M. Lochmaier, "eines der ausgezeichneteren Mitglieder der Wiener Universität aus der rheinischen Nation" (ADB XIX, 64) war Nachfolger des 1489 verstorbenen Paul Wann als Kanonikus, Dr. der Theologie und des kanonischen Rechts auf der Domkanzel in Passau.- Wanns 23 Predigten sind über das ganze Buch verteilt und zusätzlich numeriert.- Titel mit kl. überklebt. Ausschnitt, 7 Bll. zu Beginn mit kl. Beschädigungen im Rand durch Wurmfraß, tls. leicht braunfleckig od. wasserrandig, Ebd. mit kl. Bezugsfehlstellen u. Wurmgängen.

      [Bookseller: Antiquariat Johannes Müller]
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        (Incunabolo) OPERA. (Colophon.)... Diligenter emendata per Thadaeum Ugoletum parmensem.

      Iohannes de Tridino alias Tacuinus 1495 CLAUDIANUS, Claudius (370-405 d.C.). Impressis Venetiis Iohannes de Tridino alias Tacuinus. Anno 1495 die 6 Iunii. In-4° (mm. 213x155), m. pelle su assicelle di legno senza fermagli. (128) ff. segn. a-q9 (manca a1 col titolo). Testo completo. Carattere romano (tipo 82 Ra), 4 ll. Grandi iniziali ed insegna tipografica de Tacuino in fine incise in legno. Il Claudiano, poeta di ispirazione classica, dal nativo Egitto passò a Roma negli ultimi anni di vita e vicino a Stilcone, in lotta contro i barbari, ne magnificò le imprese in eleganti poemi. Trattò inoltre temi mitologici e scrisse in greco la Gigantomachia. H. 5312. C. 16572. Pellechet, 3803. Proctor, 5436. B.M.C., V, p. 529. G.W., 7061. I.G.I., 3005. Oates, 2111.

      [Bookseller: Brighenti libri esauriti e rari]
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        Biblia Latina [Biblia Integra].

      Basel: Johann Froben, October 27, 1495. - [Biblia integra: summata:distincta: accuratuius reemendata: utrusque testamenti concordantiis illustrate]. Size of the binding: 4 1/4 inches x 6 1/4 in x 2 1/2 in thick. 456 leaves of 508 (lacking the title leaf, the St. Jerome woodcut, introductory material, "interpretationes hebraicorum nominum, Translatores Biblie" material.) Signatures "a-y8," "A-Mm8" present (lacking: "AA8 BB4 + A-E8": 52 leaves). First signature "a" begins: "Epistola sancti Hieronymi. Incipit epistola beati Hieronymi ad Paulinum presbyte' de omnibus divine historie libris." The text of the Bible begins at "a4" with "In principio," and concludes at "Mm8," with the printer's colophon at the end: "Finit per Johannem froben de Hamelburgk civem Basiliesi. Anno domini M.cccc.xcv, sexto Kalendas Novemebres. Deo gratias." The leaves have been numbered in ink in the upper right (with some mis-numbering). Rubrications are present. Some initial letters filled in with red or purple inks. Manuscript title page, reading: "Biblia Sacra hoc est Vetus et Novum testamentum secundum translationem b. Hieroniimi ad Damasum Papam. Basilae excudebat Joes Froben: Anno verbi incarnati Mccccxcv." This title page appears to have been made in the early 17th century, and the book may also have been bound at that time. This title page shows some early ownership notations: M. J. Bahylni (?) 1613; P. F. S Mariae in Kaysershaim. Following is a second manuscript title page which shows some faded German & Latin inscriptions, including the Bahylni name and a faded Latin inscription under the printer's colophon with possible mention of Luther (.Luthorum [?]. anni 1522. ). A photostat of the missing St. Jerome woodcut is laid in this copy. Pigskin over wooden boards with four raised bands, old inked titling, blind-stamped designs and borders on the covers; lacking the clasps; all edges stained blue. Some cropping to side notes & references on a few pages. Back inner hinge shows a repair with a paper tab. A copy of the "Poor Man?s Bible," so-called because of its low cost when first published. It could literally fit into a pocket, and thus was portable and able to be kept at home. The Latin text is printed in double columns with marginal cross-references. [Attributes: Hard Cover]

      [Bookseller: Peter Keisogloff Rare Books, Inc.]
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        NOVUM EPISTOLARIUM

      Basileae: Per magistrum Ioannem De Amerbach, 1495. Hardcover. How to Write a Letter to your Son in 1495. 229 x 165 mm (9 x 6 1/2"). 159 unnumbered leaves, lacking the final blank. Single column, 35 lines, roman type. Pleasing contemporary pigskin over wooden boards, original clasp plate and catch (thong lacking), remnants of manuscript pastedowns. Initials hand-painted in red (but only a few called for). Contemporary ownership inscription on title, earlier inscription obscured by dark strip of ink. Goff P-623; BMC III, 756. Top of spine a bit worn, lower joint with crack from bottom of spine to lowest band (small loss at band), pigskin somewhat darkened and slightly chafed, but the contemporary binding entirely sound and still quite appealing, even with its imperfections. Fore margin of title page expertly renewed with old paper, the same leaf with small hole caused by inked-out title inscription on recto (partial loss of two letters on verso), minor marginal wormholes through a couple of quires, intermittent faint dampstains in margin, other trivial defects, but quite a fresh copy internally with ample fore and tail margins. All in all, an excellent contemporary copy. A practical work of considerable utility, this volume contains summaries of rhetorical precepts to be applied to the art of letter writing, a study of 24 different types of letters, instructions as to the proper forms of address, and a series of sample letters. These samples show how to write letters of congratulations or vituperation, how to arouse one to action or to encourage the acceptance of peace, and even how a mother ought best to communicate with her son. First printed in 1481, the manual went through at least eight incunabular printings (three by Amerbach), but as it was a work likely to experience heavy use, these early editions are all rare. Of the eight editions, ABPC records an aggregate total of just four sales of the work (no copy of our edition) since 1975, and only one of these coming since 1985. This is the chief work of Giovanni Mario Filelfo (1426-80), whose life was spent teaching, wandering, writing poetry, and enjoying the hospitality extended to him by various courts and influential people. He is not to be confused with the notable humanist Francesco Filelfo, his father, who also wrote a popular book on letter writing. Johann Amerbach was the first printer in Basel to use a roman type. According to Pollard, he very likely learned to print in Venice, as he is sometimes described as "Hans von Venedig" in contemporary records. He was especially known for his editions of humanist and patristic texts, and he employed the scholars Johann Reuchlin and Sebastian Brant as editors, in addition to printing books by them.

      [Bookseller: Phillip J. Pirages Fine Books and Mediev]
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        Illuminated leaf from a Book of Hours

      Paris or Rouen,: circa, 1495.. Illuminated leaf, 215 x 152 mm., with a panel border on both sides of the leaf composed of blue and gold acanthus leaves and coloured flowers and leaves on diagonal grounds of liquid gold, illuminated initials in white tracery on pink grounds, and numerous 1-line initials in gold alternately on red and blue grounds, naturalistic branch line fillers; 27 lines of text in gothic script. A beautifully illuminated leaf from a luxurious fifteenth-century French Book of Hours. This leaf is from the shorter version of the central text of the Book of Hours, modelled on the Divine Office and performed at the eight canonical hours of the day and which was called the "Little Office of the Blessed Virgin" (or Hours of the Virgin).The panel border on each side of the leaf is composed of fields of blue and gold acanthus leaves interspersed with mauve, red, blue and white flowers on zig-zag grounds of liquid gold. Additionally, there are four 2-line initials in white on pink grounds; five 1-line initials in liquid gold on blue or red and four line-fillers in similar colours.The delicate initials are typical of the work executed in Paris or Rouen; in tandem with the generous application of liquid gold in the margins, it places this work as hailing from the late fifteenth century.

      [Bookseller: Hordern House Rare Books]
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        SERMONES DE TEMPORE ET DE SANCTIS

      [Paris]: [Georg Wolf], [1495]. Early Edition. Hardcover. Some waterstaining to varying degrees, mostly marginal and generally light, but within text of a few folios; signature D with outer margins repaired to varying degrees, heavier to D9 and 10 with loss of a few letters to both folios. Still an attractive, Near Fine incunable. Quarto (6-1/4" x 8-3/4") bound in recent full antique-style speckled calf leather; 213 (of 218 folios, lacking a1 and r3-6), double column, 54 lines and head-line, Gothic letter with 244 rubricated initials. Occasional early ink marginalia and numbers, later extensive ink notes to verso of final leaf. BMC VIII, 148; Goff B-438; Hain 2843; ISTC No. ib00438000 locates only one copy in the United States. The sermons of St. Bernard, one of the most accomplished and influential preachers of the later Middle Ages, were popular with priests and young clerics. This edition was one of six printed in the fifteenth century.

      [Bookseller: Charles Agvent]
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        DE CONSOLATIONE PHILOSOPHIAE

      Nuremberg: Anton Koberger, 1495. Hardcover. 229 x 159 mm (9 x 6 1/4"). 174 unnumbered leaves (last blank). 46 lines of commentary surrounding Boethius' text on three sides, gothic type. With commentary ascribed in the text to Thomas Aquinas. Contemporary calf-backed wooden boards, raised bands, the leather decorated with various stamps of pineapple, roses, and foliage, remnant of very early paper spine label, original brass clasp and catch, rawhide thong (old but apparently not original), half-inch of leather replaced at head of spine. With hand-painted initials throughout in red or blue. Pastedowns and title page with ink annotations in a contemporary hand. Goff B-771; BMC II, 413. Covers with enough tiny round wormholes to notice (but not enough to be offensive), three small portions of leather missing, a chip out of the wood at lower corner of back cover, but the original binding still completely solid, with only minor restoration (as noted), and generally pleasing. Dust soiling to title page, minor (almost entirely marginal) worming throughout (text barely affected on just a few leaves), first three gatherings with dampstain in gutter, other trivial defects in the text, but still an attractive copy internally, the leaves almost entirely fresh and clean, and with very ample margins. This is an enduringly popular work from perhaps the most important--and certainly the most successful--15th century printer in Europe. Born at the time of the final collapse of the Roman Empire in the West, Boethius (ca. 480-524) became the chief secretary of Theodoric the Ostrogoth, and hampered by unnatural integrity and idealism, he was maligned, imprisoned, and executed. While in prison, he wrote his "Consolation," in which Lady Philosophy appears to him and urges him to embrace a sublime indifference toward suffering and death. Called by Gibbon "a golden volume . . . which claims incomparable merit from the barbarism of the times and the situation of the author," it has had a lasting popularity, never more so than during the Middle Ages. Its contemplation of the profound perplexities of existence (for example, the presence of evil in the face of a loving God, the notion of free will in the face of God's foreknowledge) make it a book with the deepest of teleological consequences for believers of any faith, and the fact that Boethius was apparently not himself a Christian has always been readily ignored (particularly by those who tried to have him canonized as a Christian martyr!). Some indication of the importance of the work over time can be seen in the facts that Alfred the Great translated the work into Anglo-Saxon in the 9th century and that Caxton's 1490 printing of Chaucer's translation was one of the first works to appear in English. Ours is the last of five editions of this work printed by Koberger; his 1473 Latin and German version was the second appearance in print of Boethius and the sixth work issued by his Nuremberg press. A former goldsmith from a prominent family of artisans, Anton Koberger (ca. 1440-1513) was undoubtedly the most prosperous member of the Renaissance printing trade. He established his press in Nuremberg in 1472 and quickly became one of the most prolific printers in the business, outstripping Schoeffer of Mainz by 1480. He produced about 200 works by 1500, including the most famous illustrated work of the era, the "Nuremberg Chronicle." In addition to a number of beautifully printed Bibles, he published philosophical and theological works on as many as 24 presses under his own supervision; although most Koberger books have Nuremberg imprints, he had books printed for him at several other locations, and he had sales outlets from Paris and Lyon to Budapest and Warsaw. As a wholesaler, this "king of booksellers" handled all the major scientific works of the period and dominated the book trade in Europe. The present item is more modest than grand, but it is obviously of interest for its content, and it is certainly a rare edition (no copy listed in ABPC since at least 1975); moreover, its original 15th century binding, its thick textured leaves with deep impressions of the type, and its commodious margins make it an appealing antique object to contemplate.

      [Bookseller: Phillip J. Pirages Fine Books and Mediev]
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        BIBLE IN LATIN, with the "Glossa Ordinaria" and with the "Postillae" of Nicolaus de Lyra. The volume containing JOB, PSALMS, PROVERBS, ECCLESIASTES, SONG OF SONGS, WISDOM, and ECCLESIASTICUS

      Venice: Paganinus de Paganinis, 18 April, 1495. Hardcover. In a Spectacular Papal Binding byThe Foremost Roman Binder of the Time. 368 x 241 mm (14 1/2 x 9 1/2"). 471-499, 400-666 leaves (complete, with the misfoliation seen in other copies). Text set in two columns, with smaller interlinear commentary, and the whole surrounded by 83 lines of commentary, all in gothic type. Volume III, only, of four. Edited by Bernardinus Gadolus, Eusebius Hispanus, and Secundus Contarenus. SUPERB 16TH CENTURY ROMAN RED MOROCCO, ELABORATELY GILT, over bevelled wooden boards, covers with a wide frame of densely gilt floral vines enclosing a central panel featuring an intricate strapwork design of interlocking lobed frames and a large central lozenge, the strapwork embellished with swirling gilt floral vines, THE ARMS OF POPE PAUL IV AT CENTER; the lower cover similarly decorated, but with gilt titling at head; raised bands, five spine compartments decorated with gilt floral vines, the other containing gilt titling, edges gilt and gauffered with a complex knotwork pattern. Front free endpaper with a rubbing of Paul IV';s seal and brief description of his arms in French tipped on. Goff B-608; BMC V, 458. A scattering of tiny wormholes to first quarter of book, to last couple of quires, and to inside of back cover, isolated minor marginal smudges or faint stains, a thin two-inch crack at head of rear joint, extremities a bit worn, front board with a few small abrasions and perhaps two dozen tiny round wormholes, silver markings on papal arms oxidized, but still A BEAUTIFUL EXAMPLE, THE VERY ORNATE BINDING ESPECIALLY LUSTROUS and with no significant wear, and the text especially fresh, clean, and bright. This is a very well-preserved biblical volume in a dazzling papal binding done for Paul IV (1476-1559) by a craftsman of the highest repute. The commentary here is divided into two parts: the "Glossa Ordinaria"--attributed until the 20th century to Walafrid Strabo, but now believed to be the work of Anselm of Laon (d. 1117)--surrounds the scripture and typically takes up about two-thirds of the page. Below it appear the "Postillae" of Nicolaus de Lyra (ca. 1270-1349), originally printed by Sweynheym and Pannartz in 1471 and constituting the first commentary on the Bible to appear in print. Based on matching tools or certain verifiability, our magnificent binding was produced by Niccolo Franzese, said by Hobson to be "the most successful Roman binder of the mid-sixteenth century." Born Nicolas Fery in Rheims, Franzese brought French binding styles to Rome, and Hobson credits him with popularizing the Parisian decorative fashions there. He began binding books for Pope Paul III's private library by 1542 and worked at the Vatican for succeeding pontiffs until his death in 1570-71. In addition to this association with the Vatican, Franzese is also well known for his connection with the celebrated "Apollo & Pegasus" bindings done for a Genoese nobleman named Giovanni Battista Grimaldi (ca. 1524 - ca. 1612). These volumes, about 200 in number, are so named because they were bound to a design, the key feature of which was an oval plaquette showing Apollo and Pegasus at the middle of each cover. Hobson has identified three shops employed to bind the books: those of Luigi de Gava, Marcantonio Guillery, and Franzese. These bindings had long been famous and their provenance much debated before Hobson identified their original owner in 1975, and they became even more widely known because of Hobson's revelations about the counterfeit "Apollo and Pegasus" bindings produced by two Milanese binders at the end of the 19th and beginning of the 20th centuries. Our papal binding appears once to have been part of a set now represented (by an identically decorated volume IV attributed to Franzese) in the British Library; it is listed in their Database of Bookbindings under shelfmark Davis866. The printer here was the first of the great Paganini printing family to set up shop in Venice, where he worked in partnership with Georgius Arrivabene from 1483 to 1488. He began printing volumes under his name alone in 1487. Between 1490 and 1495, books from the press bear the names of other family members, but Paganinus re-emerged as the head of the firm in 1494, and continued to run it into the 16th century.

      [Bookseller: Phillip J. Pirages Fine Books and Mediev]
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        [In Greek]: THEOKRITOU EIDOLLIA. [IDYLLIA]. ECLOGAE TRIGINTA. GENUS THEOCRITI [ET] DE INVENTIONE BUCOLICORUM. DIONYSIUS CATO. DISTICHI. SENTENTIÆ SEPTEM SAPIENTIUM. DE INVIDIA. THEOGNIS. SENTENTIÆ ELEGIACÆ. [VARIOUS POETS]. SENTENTIÆ MONOSTICHI. PYTHAGORAS. AUREA CARMINA. PHOCYLIDES POEMA ADMONITORIUM. CARMINA SIBYLLÆ ERYTHRÆÆ. DIFFERENTIA VOCIS. HESIOD. THEOGONIA. SCUTUM HERCULIS. OPERA ET DIES

      Venetiis: Ac studio Aldi Manucii Romani, 1495. Second Edition of Theocritus; EDITIO PRINCEPS of Hesiod';s "Theogonia" and "Scutum Herculis," "Sententiae Septem Sapientum," Theognis of Megara's "Elegies," and "Carmina Sibyllae Erythraeae&#82. Hardcover. An Irresistible Combination: an Aldine IncunableIn an Outstanding Douglas Cockerell Binding. 314 x 197 mm (12 3/8 x 7 3/4"). 140 unnumbered leaves. (Collates as BMC copy IB. 24408). Single column, 30 lines, Greek type. Edited by Aldus Pius Manutius. Second Edition of Theocritus; EDITIO PRINCEPS of Hesiod';s "Theogonia" and "Scutum Herculis," "Sententiae Septem Sapientum," Theognis of Megara's "Elegies," and "Carmina Sibyllae Erythraeae&#82. SPLENDID DARK GREEN MOROCCO, INLAID AND GILT, BY DOUGLAS COCKERELL FOR W. H. SMITH (stamp-signed "WHS" on rear turn-in), covers framed by interlocking gilt-rule rectangles, with complex cornerpieces comprised of three inlaid white morocco Tudor roses and clusters of brown morocco spade-shaped leaves, large central medallion of interlacing gilt lines with white Tudor rose at center surrounded by a very intricate assemblage of inlaid brown leaves and yellow acorns, the whole accented with multiple gilt and inlaid dots, and an inlaid rose inside interlocking gilt hearts above and below the central medallion; raised bands, spine compartments densely and beautifully inlaid with clusters of leaves and four ivory acorns (the binding with a total of 418 inlays), turn-ins with multiple gilt rules. In a very fine later(?) suede-lined folding box of dark green morocco with spine decorated to resemble that of the book. With woodcut headpieces and initials. Front pastedown with oval bookplate of James Patrick Ronaldson Lyell; rear pastedown with bookplate of Lord Wardington; occasional faded marginal in an early hand. Handwritten letter (dated 1907) from Douglas Cockerell to Lionel Muirhead, who apparently commissioned the binding, regarding recommendations for its design. Kallendorf & Wells 3; Renouard 1495/3; Goff T-144; BMC V, 554, IB. 24408; not in Ahmanson-Murphy. Expert renewal to substantial portions of the margins of the final (colophon) leaf (well away from the letterpress), very probably washed, at least in places (as suggested by faded marginalia on one leaf), but the paper still strong and fresh and the type clear, a bit of soiling to first and last pages as well as folios 97-100, other mild marginal foxing or smudges, but still A MOST DESIRABLE COPY, the magnificent binding unusually lustrous and entirely unworn, and the text crisp enough to crackle when the leaves are turned. This is an irresistible item that combines an early Aldine incunable, a book of considerable textual importance, and a binding executed by the outstanding English binder of the early 20th century. Perhaps the person most singly responsible for bringing down to us the literary treasures of antiquity, Aldo Manuzio (born Teobaldo Manucci, commonly called by his Latin name Aldus Manutius, 1449-1515) established his press in Venice in 1494, produced a long list of classical works, especially of Greek authors and often in first edition, and began in 1501 a series of portable editions of Latin, Greek, and Italian classics that brought widespread popularity in Italy to works that even those of modest means could afford. When Aldus died, virtually all of the important works from classical Greek had been published, and he himself had been responsible for 27 first editions as printer and often as editor as well. The present item is just the third work listed by Renouard and Kallendorf & Wells, and is sought after as a rarity of special typographical beauty. The first third of the volume contains the second printing of the works of Theocritus, a third century B.C. Greek from Sicilian Syracuse. He was known as the greatest of Greek pastoral poets, and his "Idylls" served as the model for Virgil's "Eclogues." Although the compositions vary in content (among the most famous, for example, is the spell chanted by Simaitha to force her lover's return), they typically present the world of shepherds sheltering in the shade and singing to the music of panpipes. But the works are far from rustic, being instead highly wrought compositions that often meditate on the poetic craft itself. Our volume also contains the editio princeps of Hesiod's "Shield of Hercules" and "Theogony," as well as "Works and Days" (which was first printed in 1493), making this the first edition of the complete extant works of one of the earliest of Greek poets (ca. 700 B. C.). In contrast to the heroic epics of Homer, Hesiod, a shepherd and farmer, reflects the life of the lowly in "Works and Days," which contains ethical, political, and economical rules in connection with agriculture, commerce, navigation, choosing a wife, and educating one's children, with a significant section devoted to viticulture and wine making. "Theogony" or "Birth of the Gods" concerns the mythical origins of the gods and heroes. The volume also contains the editio princeps of the surviving works of the sixth century B.C. elegiac poet Theognis of Megara and the "Sentences" of the Seven Sages, philosophers noted for such wordly wisdom as "everything in moderation." In addition, this publication marks the first appearance in print of the Erythraean Sibyl's prophecy regarding the Redemption of Christ. Shorter works here include a selection of Greek poems embracing the Golden Verses of Pythagoras and the Distichs of Cato. The gloriously animated binding is by Douglas Cockerell (1870-1945), one of the greatest binders to emerge from the Arts and Crafts movement. He was generally considered to be the leading and most respected binder of his day, and through his work, teaching, and publications, he probably exerted "more influence on bookbinding practice and design than any one man has had before." (DNB) As we know from the laid-in autograph letter, he designed the binding in 1907 for artist Lionel Muirhead (1845-1925). Our volume was also owned by James P. R. Lyell (1871-1948), described by DNB as "a self-taught bibliophile and scholar of extraordinary enthusiasm and discrimination, and one who deserves to be remembered . . . by the whole bibliographical world." It also graced the Oxfordshire library of the second Lord Wardington (1924-2005), a leading English bibliophile and member of the Roxburghe Club. The present book is not frequently seen (no other copy appears to be for sale currently), and the price here is meant to be advantageous: this copy was sold at Sotheby's for slightly more than the equivalent of $44,000 (including buyer's premium) in 2006.

      [Bookseller: Phillip J. Pirages Fine Books and Mediev]
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        Vita et processus sancti Thome Cantuariensis martyris super libertate ecclesiastica. - (Colophon:)

      Paris, J. Philippe, 27 March 1495.4to. Later vellum. (98) ff., Gothic letter, double columns, 45 lines. Small repair in a2 slightly affecting a couple of words, and in the inner margin of title; without the pamphlet (18 ff.) written in 1329 by P. Bertrand in defence of the rights of the Church against the temporal monarchs, which is frequently bound with the present work. First edition of the first printed life of St. Thomas à Becket, written about 1199 by Henry, Abbot of Croyland (Lincolnshire), who used the writings of four contemporaries intimately associated with Becket and his cause against King Henry II. See the detailed description in Brunet V, 1319. Hain 15510. Goff T-159. BL STC 421. Edizione originale della prima biografia del santo. A volte si trova con un?altra opera di 18 fogli sul potere temporale della chiesa. Alone nel margine int. del primo foglio e piccolo restauro nel secondo. P. pergamena antica.

      [Bookseller: Libreria Antiquaria Rappaport]
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        [Opera Medicinalia.]

      Folio (318 x 217 mm.), 332 unnumbered leaves. Gothic type, printed in double columns, 66 lines, floriated woodcut white-on-black initials, numerous initials supplied in red or blue, headings underlined in red, large publisher's woodcut device at end. Contemporary blind-tooled half pigskin over beech boards, lettered in manuscript on upper cover. Upper joint just cracking, one upper corner chipped, old and almost imperceptible repair to fore-edge of upper board, clasps missing, wormtrack in lower inner blank corner of first dozen leaves then diminishing, otherwise a fine copy in a very well preserved contemporary binding. Old armorial bookplate on upper cover, two later bookplates on front pastedown.

      [Bookseller: Nigel Phillips]
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        DIOMEDIS DOCTISSIMI AC DILIGENTISSIMI LINGUAE LATINAE PERSCRUTATORIS DE ARTE GRAMMATICA OPUS UTILISSIMUM.

      In-4 p., mz. pelle settecentesca, dorso a cordoni con fregi e tit. oro su tassello, 84 cc.nn. Al verso del front.: "In hoc volumine continentur: DIOMEDES (...) - PHOCAS "De nomine et verbo. Epitoma Prisciani" - CAPER: "De latinitate" - AGRAETIUS: "De orthographia et proprietate et differentia sermonis" - DONATUS: "De barbarismo et octo partibus orationis" - SERVIUS: "In secundam Donati editionem interpretatio" - SERGIUS: "In secundam Donati editionem commentarius". Al recto della c. 84: "Impressum Venetiis per Theodor De Ragazonibus de Asula. Anno Domini nostri Iesu Christi. MCCCCLXXXXV. Die vero.XII.mensis Iuni" e il registro. Cfr.Hain,II,6219 - Goff "Incunabula in American Libraries",214 - Incunabuli della Biblioteca di Bergamo,453 - The British Library,216 - L'Adams,I,494 cita l'ediz. di Parigi del 1507 - Essling,II,563 e 564 cita solo le ediz. del 1491 e 1494 con frontespizio illustrato. Solo piccolissimi fori di tarlo e lievi aloni marginali su alc. carte; antiche annotazioni marginali, altrimenti bell'esemplare. "Diomede, grammatico latino della seconda meta' del IV secolo D.C., autore di un'Ars Grammatica in tre libri (I: le parti del discorso - II: gli elementi della grammatica - III: il piu' importante, poetica e metrica), utilissimi anche per la storia dei generi letterari". Cosi' Dizionario Treccani,IV, p. 71. .

      [Bookseller: Libreria Antiquaria Malavasi]
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        Enarratio de anima ex aristotelis institutione. interprete Hieronymo donato Patritio Veneto. [Alexander of Aphrodisia's commentary on Aristotle's De Anima, translated by Girolamo Donato].

      (Brixiae (Brescia), Bernardinus de Misintis, 1495, [on colophon]). 4to. Contemporary full vellum w. some wear, handwritten title on spine. First leaf a bit darkened, first 6 leaves w. neat repair to upper right coerner, far from affecting teaxt, last few leaves w. some brown spots, otherwise only occasional and not heavy brownspotting. Some near cont. marginal annotations, some shaved. Last end-papers renewed. Pasted down front end-paper w. long inscription in Italian, quoting from Giovio about Pomponazzi and his use of Aphrodisias' text (ab. 1800). A neat and solid copy. Large woodcut opening initial, capital spaces throughout. 91 leaves (of 92, -lacking first blank).. The exceedingly scarce very first edition of Alexander of Aphrodisias' hugely influential commentary on Aristotle's De Anima; the enormously important first printing of Girolamo Donato's (1457-1511) translation from the Greek, which came to influence almost all original philosophy of the Renaissance with its hugely controversial exposition of the impossibility of the immortality of the individual soul, interpreted from Aristotle's De Anima -On the Soul- one of the most influential and commented on philosophical works of all times. If one question is to be pointed out as the main philosophical one of the Renaissance, it is that of the soul's relation to reason or intelligence. This was the question of his (Pomponazzi's) time. Anima and Intellectus were then the watchwords of the schools: their relation, or the nature of anima intellective, was the point round which discussion moved and on which was invoked the authority of Averroes, Alexander or St Thomas. When the audiences in the Italian class-rooms called out Quid de anima? this was the subject which they desired to hear treated. (Douglas, p. 74). And if the new interpretation of Aristotle that affected all of Renaissance philosophy had one representative authority, it was Alexander of Aphrodisias. Pour couvrir cette tendance nouvelle, un nouveau nom était nécessaire: On trouva celui d'Alexandre d'Aphrodisias. Désormais Averroès ne régnera plus seul... (Renan, Averroes, p. 282). L'immortalité, en effet, était, vers 1500, le problem autour duquel s'agitait l'esprit philosophique en Italie... (Renan, p. 283).The publication of this present work, the first edition of Alexander's commentary, was of the utmost importance to Renaissance philosophy, religion, scholarship and learning, and it greatly influenced the path of Aristotelian scholarship as well as almost all original philosophy within this period. Alexander came to influence all reading of Aristotle in the Renaissance, -a period, in which the De Anima - like it had done earlier in the Middle Ages - occupied the central role within the field of philosophy; -few other works have been so commented on and been of such importance to theology, philosophy, psychology and natural sciences in general. The work re-evoked a great interest in the sort of philosophy that was not primarily connected to logic, and it was the cause of the greatest and most heated controversies due to the obvious consequences its doctrines could have for the Church. With reference to those works of Aristotle which were and remained the center of instruction in logic and natural philosophy, the most important changes derived from the fact that the works of the ancient Greek commentators became completely available in Latin between the late fifteenth and the end of the sixteenth centuries and were more and more used to balance the interpretations of the medieval Arabic and Latin commentators. The Middle Ages had known their works only in a very limited selection or through quotations in Averroes. Ermolao Barbaro's complete translation of Themistius and Girolamo Donato's version of Alexander's De Anima were among the most important ones in a long line of others. When modern historians speak of Alexandrism as a current within Renaissance Aristotelianism that was opposed to Averroism, they are justified in part by the fact that the Greek commentators, that is Alexander and also Themistius, Simplicius, and many others, were increasingly drawn upon for the exposition of Aristotle. In a more particular sense, Alexander's specific notion that the human soul was mortal received more attention from the Aristotelian philosophers. (Kristeller, Renaissance Thought and its sources, 1979, p. 45).The group of innovating Alexandrists who appear at the end of the century derive their name from Alexander of Aphrodisias, the best of the Greek commentators on Aristotle, whom they studied and cited; ... but the Averroists had likewise cited Alexander; his views they found discussed by the commentator himself. ... And we find strong Humanistic interests. Whereas before the Physica had been the center of attention, now it is the De Anima and the interpretation of human nature that awaken controversy. Like the Platonists, the Aristotelians began discussing God, freedom, and immortality in relation to the individual soul, but, unlike them, they arrived through Aristotle at naturalistic conclusions. (Randall in: Cassirer, Kristeller and Randall, The Renaissance Philosophy of Man, 1956, p. 260).Of his (Alexander's) interpretations of Aristotle (either in formal commentaries or in other writings), two are particularly famous... Alexander interprets a most difficult aspect of Aristotle's psychology in his On the Soul, Book III, chapters 4 and 5... The most conspicuous result of this theory is the denial of any kind of personal immortality... The assertion or the denial of the correctness of Alexander's interpretation of Aristotle and, even more, the correctness of the doctrine (denial of personal immortality) became one of the great controversies of the Middle Ages and early modern times. (D.S.B. I: pp. 117-18). The Christian commentators of Aristotle's On the Soul naturally expounded an interpretation of the question of the immortality of the soul that coincided with the religious Christian doctrines of the periods. Meanwhile, in the second century CE, Alexander of Aphrodisias wrote commentaries on De anima that were to conflict with Christian teaching on the soul, and, in the twelfth century, Averroes proposed another line of interpretation that was equally offensive. Beginning in the thirteenth century, scholastic philosophers and theologians in Paris and elsewhere debated this question hotly and often... After the early fourteenth century the controversy simmered, but then it boiled over again at Padua in the late fifteenth century, when Pomponazzi was a student. (Copenhaver & Schmitt, Renaissance Philosophy, 1992, pp. 106-7).Alexander provided a mean between the purely material and the abstract intellect, and he made a place for reason and intellect. With the aid of Alexander -reading the exact edition that we have here, namely the very first printed version of the groundbreaking work-, Pomponazzi, The last Scholastic and the first man of the Enlightenment, was the one to solve the main problem of the Renaissance. He agreed that Aquinas had sufficiently refuted Averroës' doctrine of the unity of all intellect, but he did not agree that there was a plurality of intellects, rather that the human soul was mortal, -also the rational faculty, -a doctrine that of course greatly disturbed the Church. For this interpretation he appealed to Alexander of Aphrodisias, who identifies the active mortal intellect with the divine mind and declares the individual reason of each man to be mortal. (Note 1: Pomponazzi, who was ignorant of Greek (as were many of the most important scholars of the Renaissance), doubtless used the translation of Alexander peri psyches, by Girolamo Donato of Venice (Breschia, 1495) ). To escape from the imputation of heterodoxy, he distinguished between two orders of truth, the philosophical and the theological... (Sandy II:p. 110).It is a curious but generally accepted conception that with the rise of the Renaissance came the fall of Aristotle. Weather this is actually true can be disputed, but it is a fact that with the recovery of many lost works of ancient literature, the widening of the range of classical studies and the renewed interest in Plato, Aristotle was no longer the sole authority on a huge number of fields. That this should mean a total ignorance of the teachings of Aristotle must be considered somewhat of a myth (though a very frequently repeated one), and in fact with the grand humanists of the late 15th and early 16th century, the study of Aristotle fits perfectly with the broader comprehension of scholarship. The great humanists like Ficino, Pico and Pomponazzi had not forgotten about Aristotle, and the revival of learning did not mean the neglect of the prince of philosophers. On the contrary, with the appreciation of the knowledge of Greek and the invention of the printing, works were being translated and printed like never before, which meant that the greatest of the humanists, many of whom did not themselves know Greek, could be acquainted with the Greek texts of Aristotle and the Greek commentaries of The Commentator, Alexander, in Latin translation. And thus this first printing of the interpretation of the greatest of all commentators of one of the most influential works in the history of philosophy comes to live and comes to influence an entire generation of philosophers, humanists and thinkers. The De Anima became one of the most studied texts of all times, and it hugely influenced late 15th and early 16th century philosophy, theology and thought in general. Although the ancient commentators on Aristotle left a much larger literature than that surviving from Aristotle himself, only a few of their commentaries were known to the medieval West. In the four decades after 1490, the interpretations of Alexander, Themistius, Ammonius, Philoponus, Simplicius, and other Greek commentators were added to the familiar views of Averroes, Albert and Thomas, thus stimulating new solutions to Aristotelian problems. Equally important for the continued growth of the Peripatetic synthesis was the recovery and diffusion of the Greek commentaries on Aristotle. These treatises, about ten times longer than the works they discuss, were written by pagans and Christians, Platonists and Peripatetics in late antiquity, between the second and seventh centuries in the Greek world of the Eastern Mediterranean, and then again in twelfth-century Byzantium. The most important of the two dozen commentators were Alexander of Aphrodisias, Ammonius, Simplicius, Themistius and John Philoponus. Of these five, only Alexander and Themistius were Aristotelians... (Copenhaver & Schmitt, p. 68).Alexandre d'Aphrodisias peut être considéré comme le premier auteur de l'immense importance que la théorie du troisième livre de l'Ame acquit dans les dernieres siècles de la philosophie grecque, et Durant tout le moyen âge. (Renan, p. 99).Graesse I: 69: ''Cette traduction, qui diffère de la précédente, a été réimprimée plusieurs fois, p. ex.: s. l. 1500. in-fol. Venet. 1502. 1514. 1538. in 8vo. Basil. 1535. in 8vo

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