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Archive relating to Marlborough - CHURCHILL Winston - 1933. [1277207]
1933 - CHURCHILL, Winston. Archive of material relating to Marlborough: His Life and Times. London and other locations, 1933-38. Twenty-nine typed signed letters on 34 sheets, 2 of which measure 5 by 8 inches and the remaining of which measure 8 by 10 inches. WITH: Galley proof, measuring 10 by 14 inches. WITH: Map leaves, notes, typed carbon contents leaf, secretarially signed letters, and page-proof corrections, most measuring 8 by 10 inches. WITH: 10 telegrams from Churchill of varying dimensions. Housed together in a black binder and a custom clamshell box. $98,500.An exceptional rarity: large archive of material relating to the editing and publishing of Churchill's Marlborough: His Life and Times, comprising 29 typed letters signed from Churchill, nearly all to his notorious proofreader, C.C. Wood, together with a galley proof page with corrections in Churchill's hand and other materials. John Churchill, the first Duke of Marlborough, started his court service as a page during the reign of Charles II and ended it as Master-General of the Ordnance of the English army under George I. He served under five sovereigns, distinguished himself on the battlefield and as a diplomat, and was once even imprisoned in the Tower of London for treason. Handsome and charming"" Lord Chesterfield described him as "irresistible to either man or woman"" Marlborough's military strategy led the Duke of Wellington to say that he could "conceive nothing greater than Marlborough at the head of an English army." Future prime minister Winston Churchill, who was named after Marlborough's father and was the nephew of the Eighth Duke of Marlborough, wrote this history of his famous ancestor to refute earlier criticisms of Marlborough by the historian Thomas Babington Macaulay. "Though it was a commissioned work, Churchill would not have invested nearly a million words and ten years had it not had special significance for him. For he wrote about a man who was not only his ancestor, an invincible general, the first of what became the Spencer-Churchill dukes of Marlborough, and a maker of modern Britain, but also a supreme example of heroism in the two vocations which mainly interested Churchill and in which ultimate triumph seemed to have eluded him"" politics and war making" (Wiedhorn, 110). "It may be his greatest book. To understand the Churchill of the Second World War, the majestic blending of his commanding English with historical precedent, one has to read Marlborough. Only in its pages can one glean an understanding of the root of the speeches which inspired Britain to stand when she had little to stand with" (Langworth, 164). "The scholarship seems formidable, as in no other of his works. Picking his way through conflicting testimony and evaluations, Churchill, while leaning on William Coxe's 1818 biography of the duke, carefully weighs each writer's reliability. Yet the tone is not as detached as might be expected from an academic historian". Marlborough, with his broad European view and his apparent sense of Britain's imperial destiny, is the fulcrum, and all the other characters, parties, and issues take their places accordingly". the literati hostile to Marlborough"" Pope, Swift, Thackeray, Macaulay"" are harshly expelled from the witness stand" (Wiedhorn, 113-114). This archive of correspondence highlights both Churchill's meticulousness as a writer and editor and his relationship with his editor Charles Wood. Although Charles Wood first worked with Churchill on his book Marlborough in the 1930's, he was hired full-time in 1948 to proofread Churchill's massive multi-volume work-in-progress, The Second World War, joining Churchill's literary staff of secretaries (who typed on silent typewriters as Churchill dictated), research assistants, and advisors. Wood became "an essential member of the team and no error escaped his eye" (Gilbert VIII: 344). "The main addition to Churchill's literary entourage in 1948 was Charles Wood"" a retired proofreader w [Attributes: Signed Copy; Soft Cover]
      [Bookseller: Bauman Rare Books]
Last Found On: 2016-11-29           Check availability:      AbeBooks    

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